Posts Tagged KESSLER FOUNDATION

[WEB SITE] If You Have an Acquired Disability, Resist the Urge to Isolate Yourself, Kessler Expert Advises

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Helen M. Genova, PhD, assistant director of the Kessler Foundation’s Center for Neuropsychology and Neuroscience Research and director of the Social Cognition and Neuroscience Laboratory, shares her thoughts on how dealing with an acquired disability can affect someone mentally and physically.

What are the emotional effects an acquired disability can have on an individual?

People who have an acquired disability may have a number of emotional issues — physical and mental changes that may raise the risk for depression and anxiety. For example, people who have typically led an active lifestyle may find new physical limitations challenging in designing a new exercise program. Some individuals (like those with multiple sclerosis or a traumatic brain injury) may experience cognitive symptoms, such as memory problems, learning problems or severe fatigue, which make it difficult to spend time with friends or attend family holiday festivities. All of these symptoms may lead to depression, or make preexisting depression worse.

Are people with acquired disabilities more prone to loneliness than non-disabled individuals?

Unfortunately, people with acquired disabilities may be more prone to loneliness for a number of reasons. For one, they may experience new physical and mental limitations that may not allow them to lead the life they want to lead. For example, someone who had a career and an active social life before their diagnosis may find it difficult to “keep up” with their old way of living, because they are too fatigued to participate in life the way they used to, or they physically cannot perform the same activities they use to perform. This may lead to social isolation and loneliness. Further, some people with disabilities isolate themselves from others because they do not want to be a “burden” to their families and friends. They may feel that their disability is an inconvenience to others, or tire of having to explain why they are not feeling well, need to cancel plans, or leave early, etc. These feelings may lead them to avoid social interaction altogether, which only leads to more loneliness, and a cycle that can be difficult to break.

What advice would you give to people who are living with an acquired disability and experiencing feelings of loneliness (especially during the holidays)?

I recommend that they resist the urge to isolate themselves. In other words, find good friends who understand their disability and can provide unconditional support. Another option is to find support groups or classes geared towards people with similar disabilities. Spending time with people who truly understand what they are going through can be very comforting. Realizing that others are experiencing similar life struggles may reduce feelings of loneliness, and help you to feel more connected to others.

 [Source(s): Kessler Foundation, PRWeb]

 

via If You Have an Acquired Disability, Resist the Urge to Isolate Yourself, Kessler Expert Advises – Rehab Managment

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[NEWS] Kessler Foundation receives NIH sub-award to test new treatment for hand paralysis

NEWS RELEASE 

Stroke rehabilitation researchers test new electrical stimulation therapy for improving for hand function after stroke, as part of multi-site study headed by the MetroHealth System and Case Western Reserve University

KESSLER FOUNDATION

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IMAGE: DR. BOUKRINA IS A RESEARCH SCIENTIST IN THE CENTER FOR STROKE REHABILITATION RESEARCH AT KESSLER FOUNDATION. HER RESEARCH, WHICH ADDRESSES THE RECOVERY OF COGNITIVE AND MOTOR FUNCTION AFTER STROKE,… view more 
CREDIT: KESSLER FOUNDATION/JODY BANKS

East Hanover, NJ. November 26, 2019. Kessler Foundation is participating in a phase II multi-site study of an innovative treatment to improve hand function in stroke survivors. Olga Boukrina, PhD, research scientist in the Center for Stroke Rehabilitation Research, is the site’s principal investigator. The study is funded through a five-year $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health awarded to the principal investigator, Jayme S. Knutson, PhD, director of Research and associate professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the MetroHealth System and Case Western Reserve University.

This is the first multi-site clinical trial of contralaterally controlled functional electrical stimulation (CCFES), a new rehabilitation intervention for hand recovery following stroke developed by Knutson and colleagues. With CCFES, electrical stimulation is applied to the muscles of the weak hand through surface electrodes, causing the weak hand to open, a function that is often lost in stroke survivors. The patient controls the stimulation to their weak hand through a glove with sensors worn on their opposite, unaffected hand. Opening their unaffected hand delivers a proportional intensity of electrical stimulation that opens their weak hand, and enables them to practice using their hand in therapy. Researchers will enroll 129 patients who are 6 to 24 months post stroke who have upper extremity hemiparesis and limited hand movement.

The effectiveness of CCFES will be compared with two other treatments — cyclic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (CNMES), which has pre-set duration and intensity of stimulation and operates independent of patient control, and traditional task-based training without stimulation. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of the three treatment options for 12 weeks. The research teams will administer the treatments and conduct blinded outcome assessments. The durability of functional improvements will be evaluated at 6-month follow-up. Study sites include the MetroHealth System (Jayme Knutson, PhD), the Cleveland Clinic (Ela Plow, PT, PhD), Emory University (A.M. Barrett, MD), and Johns Hopkins University (Preeti Raghavan, MD).

“Because hand function is integral to so many activities of daily living, advances that improve function can have significant effect on the lives of stroke survivors,” said Dr. Boukrina. “This study will help determine the optimal method for restoring hand function. We anticipate that putting the patients in control of stimulating their weak hand with CCFES may activate neuroplastic changes that lead to greater and longer lasting functional gains.”

via Kessler Foundation receives NIH sub-award to test new treatment for hand paralysis | EurekAlert! Science News

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