Posts Tagged Knee

[WEB PAGE] Achieve New Level of Comfortable Control with DAFO Softback Orthoses

Cascade Dafo, creators of the original DAFO® (Dynamic Ankle Foot Orthosis), has added the DAFO Softback™ to their custom line of orthoses. The DAFO Softback provides comfortable control of mild to moderate toe walking and knee hyperextension. The AFO’s soft yet durable posterior pad and strap combination work together to comfortably resist excess plantarflexion while encouraging free dorsiflexion.

The DAFO Softback is custom fabricated from cast or scan, with a full wraparound shell that provides flexible control of foot position and alignment. For patients needing additional padded protection for sensitive foot anatomy, the DAFO Softback Softy® version has a foam inner liner.

As with all of Cascade Dafo’s products, the DAFO Softback is covered by a full 90-day warranty. For more information, visit https://cascadedafo.com.

via Achieve New Level of Comfortable Control with DAFO Softback Orthoses | Lower Extremity Review Magazine

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Bioness Receives FDA Clearance for myBioness™ iOS app for mobile control of the L300 Go™ System

VALENCIA, Calif.March 26, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Bioness, Inc., the leading provider of cutting-edge, clinically supported rehabilitation therapies, today announced that it received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the myBionessTM mobile app for use with the L300 Go System.

The new myBioness™ mobile iOS application allows home users to control their L300 Go system including ability to change stimulation modes between gait and training along with adjusting personal pre-set intensities to meet their daily activity demands. The app has been designed to keep users engaged in the rehabilitation process and motivated to meet their recovery goals with ability to track activity, set personal goals and review their progress over time using dynamic reporting capabilities.

Gait movement disorders, such as foot drop and knee instability, are often associated with an upper motor neuron disease such as stroke and multiple sclerosis as well as injuries to the brain and spinal cord. Individuals with an impaired gait have less control over their lower extremity muscles and are at an increased risk for falls. The L300 Go is the first functional electrical stimulation (FES) system to offer 3D motion detection of gait events and muscle activation using data from a 3-axis gyroscope and accelerometer.  Patient movement is monitored in all three kinematic planes and stimulation is deployed precisely when needed during the gait cycle.  An adaptive, learning algorithm accommodates changes in gait dynamics, and a high speed processor that deploys stimulation within 10 milliseconds of detecting a valid gait event.  This rapid, reliable response is critical and supports user confidence.

“Technological innovations including 3D motion detection and multi-channel stimulation work together to improve treatment efficiency and promote patient mobility,” said Todd Cushman, President and CEO of Bioness. “At Bioness, we are focused on improving the lives of patients through technology and are proud to add the myBioness mobile application to the L300 Go portfolio of products.”

The L300 Go System was cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on January 27, 2017 with formal approval of the upgraded mobile application clearance dated March 9, 2018.  The system is indicated to provide ankle dorsiflexion in adult and pediatric individuals with foot drop and/or assist knee flexion or extension in adult individuals with muscle weakness related to upper motor neuron disease/injury (e.g., stroke, damage to pathways to the spinal cord). The L300 Go System electrically stimulates muscles in the affected leg to provide ankle dorsiflexion of the foot and/or knee flexion or extension; thus, it also may improve the individual’s gait.

Bioness will begin commercial release of the myBionessTM mobile app in the spring of 2018.   The L300 Go Systems are commercially available since the summer of 2017.

About Bioness, Inc.
Bioness is the leading provider of innovative technologies helping people regain mobility and independence. Bioness solutions include implantable and external neuromodulation systems, robotic systems and software based therapy programs providing functional and therapeutic benefits for individuals affected by pain, central nervous system disorders and orthopedic injuries. Currently, Bioness offers six medical devices within its commercial portfolio which are distributed and sold on five continents and in over 25 countries worldwide. Our technologies have been implemented in the most prestigious and well-respected institutions around the globe with approximately 90% of the top rehabilitation hospitals in the United States currently using one or more Bioness solution.  Bioness has a singular focus on aiding large, underserved customer groups with innovative, evidence-based solutions and we will continue to develop and make commercially available new products that address the growing and changing needs of our customers. Individual results vary. Consult with a qualified physician to determine if this product is right for you. Contraindications, adverse reactions and precautions are available online at www.bioness.com.

Media Relations Contact Information
Next Step Communications
bioness@nextstepcomms.com
781.326.1741

All trademarks and copyrights here within are © Bioness. | http://www.bioness.comRx Only for applicable products.

SOURCE Bioness, Inc.

Related Links

https://www.bioness.com

 

via Bioness Receives FDA Clearance for myBioness™ iOS app for mobile control of the L300 Go™ System

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] MIT-Skywalker: On the use of a markerless system

Abstract:

This paper describes our efforts to employ the Microsoft Kinect as a low cost vision control system for the MIT-Skywalker, a robotic gait rehabilitation device. The Kinect enables an alternative markerless solution to control the MIT-Skywalker and allows a more user-friendly set-up. A study involving eight healthy subjects and two stroke survivors using the MIT-Skywalker device demonstrates the advantages and challenges of this new proposed approach.

Source: MIT-Skywalker: On the use of a markerless system – IEEE Xplore Document

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[VIDEO] The LegTutor by MediTouch – YouTube

Δημοσιεύτηκε στις 11 Ιουν 2017

The LegTutor consists of an ergonomic wearable leg brace. Its innovative technology allows lower extremity practice of the hip and knee employing both isolated joints and functional tasks.

The LegTutor is used by the therapist to practice both weight bearing and non weight bearing exercises. The system permits a range of biomechanical evaluations including joint active and passive range of motion. This allows the therapist to measure a baseline of movement ability and document and report progress.

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Switching control of functional electrical stimulation and motor assist for muscle fatigue compensation.

The torque generation capability of muscles often reduces during a functional electrical stimulation (FES) session due to the rapid onset of muscle fatigue. Hybrid rehabilitation systems that use FES and electric motor assist may overcome this issue.

The primary control challenge in such a system is how to allocate control inputs between electric motor and FES during muscle fatigue and muscle recovery. One strategy is to switch between FES and the electric motor by using an estimate of the muscle fatigue. This would allow the system to switch from using FES to using the electric motor when the muscle torque output has significantly decreased, then switch back to FES once the muscles have sufficiently recovered.

This paper uses a second order sliding mode controller cascaded with a feedback linearization controller for a switched, FES and electric motor, system. The second order sliding mode is achieved through the use of a variable-gain super-twisting algorithm. A Lyapunov stability analysis was used to prove asymptotic stability of the switched control system. Simulations of the developed controller on a hybrid knee extension model illustrate that prolonged knee movements can be elicited through the switched system.

Source: IEEE Xplore Abstract (Abstract) – Switching control of functional electrical stimulation and motor assist for muscle fatigue compensat…

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

[ARTICLE] Reliability of muscle strength assessment in chronic post-stroke hemiparesis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Abstract

Background:Muscle weakness is the main cause of motor impairment among stroke survivors and is associated with reduced peak muscle torque.

Objective:To systematically investigate and organize the evidence of the reliability of muscle strength evaluation measures in post-stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis.

Data Sources:Two assessors independently searched four electronic databases in January 2014 (Medline, Scielo, CINAHL, Embase).

Study Selection:Inclusion criteria comprised studies on reliability on muscle strength assessment in adult post-stroke patients with chronic hemiparesis.

Data Extraction:We extracted outcomes from included studies about reliability data, measured by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and/or similar. The meta-analyses were conducted only with isokinetic data.

Results:Of 450 articles, eight articles were included for this review. After quality analysis, two studies were considered of high quality. Five different joints were analyzed within the included studies (knee, hip, ankle, shoulder, and elbow). Their reliability results varying from low to very high reliability (ICCs from 0.48 to 0.99). Results of meta-analysis for knee extension varying from high to very high reliability (pooled ICCs from 0.89 to 0.97), for knee flexion varying from high to very high reliability (pooled ICCs from 0.84 to 0.91) and for ankle plantar flexion showed high reliability (pooled ICC = 0.85).

Conclusion:Objective muscle strength assessment can be reliably used in lower and upper extremities in post-stroke patients with chronic hemiparesis.

Source: Maney Online – Maney Publishing

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[ARTICLE] Reliability of muscle strength assessment in chronic post-stroke hemiparesis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Abstract

Background: Muscle weakness is the main cause of motor impairment among stroke survivors and is associated with reduced peak muscle torque.

Objective: To systematically investigate and organize the evidence of the reliability of muscle strength evaluation measures in post-stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis.

Data Sources: Two assessors independently searched four electronic databases in January 2014 (Medline, Scielo, CINAHL, Embase).

Study Selection: Inclusion criteria comprised studies on reliability on muscle strength assessment in adult post-stroke patients with chronic hemiparesis.

Data Extraction: We extracted outcomes from included studies about reliability data, measured by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and/or similar. The meta-analyses were conducted only with isokinetic data.

Results: Of 450 articles, eight articles were included for this review. After quality analysis, two studies were considered of high quality. Five different joints were analyzed within the included studies (knee, hip, ankle, shoulder, and elbow). Their reliability results varying from low to very high reliability (ICCs from 0.48 to 0.99). Results of meta-analysis for knee extension varying from high to very high reliability (pooled ICCs from 0.89 to 0.97), for knee flexion varying from high to very high reliability (pooled ICCs from 0.84 to 0.91) and for ankle plantar flexion showed high reliability (pooled ICC = 0.85).

Conclusion: Objective muscle strength assessment can be reliably used in lower and upper extremities in post-stroke patients with chronic hemiparesis.

via Maney Online – Maney Publishing.

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: