Posts Tagged Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

[WEB SITE] FDA approves marijuana based medication for epilepsy treatment

 

An advisory panel from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recommended the approval of a novel epilepsy drug that is made up of ingredients from marijuana. The agency normally follows the recommendations of the advisory panels regarding approvals and rejections of applications of new drugs. The recommendation statement came yesterday (19th April 2018).

If this drug gets a green light, it is expected to become the first cannabis-derived prescription medicine to be available in the US. The drug is named Epidiolex and is made by GW Pharmaceuticals from Britain. It contains cannabidiol or CBD that is derived from cannabis. However the drug is not seen to cause any intoxication among the users.

Marijuana plant flowering outdoors. Image Credit: Yarygin / Shutterstock

Marijuana plant flowering outdoors. Image Credit: Yarygin / Shutterstock

The use of only one of the components of cannabis also makes it different from medical marijuana that is approved for pain management and other conditions around the world and in the United States. Synthetic forms of chemicals in the cannabis plant are also used to treat nausea among cancer patients and in AIDS patients to prevent weight loss.

Dr. Igor Grant, director of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California San Diego welcomed this new recommendation from the panel saying, “This is a very good development, and it basically underscores that there are medicinal properties to some of the cannabinoids… I think there could well be other cannabinoids that are of therapeutic use, but there is just not enough research on them to say.”

As of now the panel has recommended the use of this new drug for two types of epilepsy only – Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome. These are notoriously difficult to treat and most people continue to have seizures despite treatment. Multiple seizures may occur in a day and this makes the children with these conditions vulnerable for developmental and intellectual disabilities. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome can appear in toddlers at around ages 3 to 5 and Dravet syndrome is usually diagnosed earlier. Nearly 30,000 children and adults suffer from Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and similar numbers of people are diagnosed with Dravet syndrome. Due to the small population of diagnosed patients Epidiolex was filed and classified under orphan drug status.

An orphan drug is one that is developed for a relatively rare disease condition. The FDA provides special subsidies and support for development of orphan drugs and often speed tracks their approval process.

The recommendation from the advisory panel is based on the results of three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials that included patients of both these disease conditions. The agency statement says, “The statistically significant and clinically meaningful results from these three studies provide substantial evidence of the effectiveness of CBD for the treatment of seizures associated with LGS and DS.” They drug causes liver damage but the report says that this could be managed effectively.

The FDA will conduct a final vote for approval of this drug in June. Oral solution of the drug for a small group of patients with these conditions would be allowed.

Reference: https://www.fda.gov/downloads/AdvisoryCommittees/CommitteesMeetingMaterials/Drugs/PeripheralandCentralNervousSystemDrugsAdvisoryCommittee/UCM604736.pdf

 

via FDA approves marijuana based medication for epilepsy treatment

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[WEB SITE] Epilepsy Drug With Marijuana-Based Ingredient Could Be Available In The US This Year

 By Allan Adamson Tech Times

A new class of epilepsy drugs based on a marijuana ingredient could be become available in the United States as early as the second half of 2018 pending approval from the Food and Drug Administration.

Epidiolex

GW Pharmaceuticals, the maker of the drug called Epidiolex, announced on Wednesday the promising results of a clinical study of the drug.

A group of 171 individuals were randomly assigned to either receive Epidiolex treatment or placebo. The participants were between 2 and 55 years old with a condition called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. They were also suffering from seizures existing drugs cannot efficiently control.

The participants on average had tried and discontinued use of six anti-seizure treatments and were experiencing 74 “drop” seizures per month. This particular seizure involves the entire body, head and trunk, and often leads to fall and other injuries.

LGS Patients Taking Epidiolex Sees Significant Reduction Seizures

Results of the study, which was reported in the journal Lancet,  showed that over a period of 14 weeks, 44 percent of the patients taking the drug saw significant reduction in seizures. The rate is significantly higher compared with the 22 percent in the placebo group. More of those who were given the experimental drug also experienced a 50 percent or greater reduction in drop seizures.

“LGS is one of the most difficult types of epilepsy to treat and the majority of patients do not have an adequate response to existing therapies,” said Elizabeth Thiele, from Harvard Medical School. “These results show that Epidiolex may provide clinically meaningful benefits for patients with LGS.”

Epidiolex is based on pure marijuana-derived cannabidiol or CBD. The cannabis compound has been known for its medical benefits sans making people feeling “stoned.”

Adverse Events Linked To Use Of Epidiolex

Adverse events associated with use of the drug include diarrhea, decreased appetite, sleepiness, vomiting, and fever. Once given the go-signal to be marketed in the United States, the drug is intended to be used as a prescription drug to be dispensed by doctors.

“Add-on cannabidiol is efficacious for the treatment of patients with drop seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and is generally well tolerated. The long-term efficacy and safety of cannabidiol is currently being assessed in the open-label extension of this trial,” investigators wrote in their report.

GW Pharmaceuticals has not yet disclosed the pricing of the drug, but Justin Gover, GW’s chief executive officer, said that the company is already in talks with health insurers about coverage.

via Epilepsy Drug With Marijuana-Based Ingredient Could Be Available In The US This Year : Health : Tech Times

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[WEB SITE] Cannabidiol shows promise to reduce seizures for people with difficult-to-treat epilepsy

Taking cannabidiol may cut seizures in half for some children and adults with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a severe form of epilepsy, according to new information released today from a large scale controlled clinical study that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. Cannabidiol is a molecule from the cannabis plant that does not have the psychoactive properties that create a “high.”

Nearly 40 percent of people with LGS, which starts in childhood, had at least a 50 percent reduction in drop seizures when taking a liquid form of cannabidiol compared to 15 percent taking a placebo.

When someone has a drop seizure, their muscle tone changes, causing them to collapse. Children and adults with LGS have multiple kinds of seizures, including drop seizures and tonic-clonic seizures, which involve loss of consciousness and full-body convulsions. The seizures are hard to control and usually do not respond well to medications. Intellectual development is usually impaired in people with LGS.

Although the drop seizures of LGS are often very brief, they frequently lead to injury and trips to the hospital emergency room, so any reduction in drop seizure frequency is a benefit.

“Our study found that cannabidiol shows great promise in that it may reduce seizures that are otherwise difficult to control,” said study author Anup Patel, MD, of Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

For the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, researchers followed 225 people with an average age of 16 for 14 weeks. The participants had an average of 85 drop seizures per month, had already tried an average of six epilepsy drugs that did not work for them and were taking an average of three epilepsy drugs during the study.

Participants were given either a higher dose of 20 mg/kg daily cannabidiol, a lower dose of 10 mg/kg daily cannabidiol or placebo as an add-on to their current medications for 14 weeks.

Those taking the higher dose had a 42 percent reduction in drop seizures overall, and for 40 percent, their seizures were reduced by half or more.

Those taking the lower dose had a 37 percent reduction in drop seizures overall, and for 36 percent, seizures were reduced by half or more.

Those taking the placebo had a 17 percent reduction in drop seizures, and for 15 percent, seizures were reduced by half or more.

There were side effects for 94 percent of those taking the higher dose, 84 percent of those taking the lower dose and 72 percent of those taking placebo, but most side effects were reported as mild to moderate. The two most common were decreased appetite and sleepiness.

Those receiving cannabidiol were up to 2.6 times more likely to say their overall condition had improved than those receiving the placebo, with up to 66 percent reporting improvement compared to 44 percent of those receiving the placebo.

“Our results suggest that cannabidiol may be effective for those with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in treating drop seizures,” said Patel. “This is important because this kind of epilepsy is incredibly difficult to treat. While there were more side effects for those taking cannabidiol, they were mostly well-tolerated. I believe that it may become an important new treatment option for these patients.”

There is currently a plan to submit a New Drug Application to the FDA later this year.

Source: Cannabidiol shows promise to reduce seizures for people with difficult-to-treat epilepsy

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