Posts Tagged locomotor function

[Abstract] Compensation or Recovery? Altered Kinetics and Neuromuscular Synergies Following High-Intensity Stepping Training Poststroke

Background. High-intensity, variable stepping training can improve walking speed in individuals poststroke, although neuromuscular strategies used to achieve faster speeds are unclear. We evaluated changes in joint kinetics and neuromuscular coordination following such training; movement strategies consistent with intact individuals were considered evidence of recovery and abnormal strategies indicative of compensation.

Methods. A total of 15 individuals with stroke (duration: 23 ± 30 months) received ≤40 sessions of high-intensity stepping in variable contexts (tasks and environments). Lower-extremity kinetics and electromyographic (EMG) activity were collected prior to (BSL) and following (POST) training at peak treadmill speeds and speeds matched to peak BSL (MATCH). Primary measures included positive (concentric) joint and total limb powers, measures of interlimb (paretic/nonparetic powers) and intralimb compensation (hip/ankle or knee/ankle powers), and muscle synergies calculated using nonnegative matrix factorization.

Results. Gains in most positive paretic and nonparetic joint powers were observed at higher speeds at POST, with decreased interlimb compensation and limited changes in intralimb compensation. There were very few differences in kinetic measures between BSL to MATCH conditions. However, the number of neuromuscular synergies increased significantly following training at both POST and MATCH conditions, indicating gains from training rather than altered speeds. Despite these results, speed improvements were associated primarily with changes in nonparetic versus paretic powers.

Conclusion. Gains in locomotor function were accomplished by movement strategies consistent with both recovery and compensation. These and other data indicate that both strategies may be necessary to maximize walking function in patients poststroke.

via Compensation or Recovery? Altered Kinetics and Neuromuscular Synergies Following High-Intensity Stepping Training Poststroke – Marzieh M. Ardestani, Catherine R. Kinnaird, Christopher E. Henderson, T. George Hornby, 2019

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Clinical Study] Exploiting Interlimb Arm and Leg Connections for Walking Rehabilitation: A Training Intervention in Stroke. – Full Text

Abstract

Rhythmic arm and leg (A&L) movements share common elements of neural control. The extent to which A&L cycling training can lead to training adaptations which transfer to improved walking function remains untested. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of A&L cycling training as a modality to improve locomotor function after stroke. Nineteen chronic stroke (>six months) participants were recruited and performed 30 minutes of A&L cycling training three times a week for five weeks. Changes in walking function were assessed with (1) clinical tests; (2) strength during isometric contractions; and (3) treadmill walking performance and cutaneous reflex modulation. A multiple baseline (3 pretests) within-subject control design was used. Data show that A&L cycling training improved clinical walking status increased strength by ~25%, improved modulation of muscle activity by ~25%, increased range of motion by ~20%, decreased stride duration, increased frequency, and improved modulation of cutaneous reflexes during treadmill walking. On most variables, the majority of participants showed a significant improvement in walking ability. These results suggest that exploiting arm and leg connections with A&L cycling training, an accessible and cost-effective training modality, could be used to improve walking ability after stroke.

1. Introduction

Body weight supported treadmill training therapy can be used for the recovery of walking after neurological damage. In this rehabilitation paradigm, participants walk on a motorized treadmill with a harness system allowing the weakened leg muscles to be freed from the necessity of body weight support and stepping is performed with the help of robotic interfaces or therapists. This protocol was initially utilized after spinal cord injury and may be equally beneficial for recovery of walking after stroke [15].

Results from this therapy are positive, but there are significant limitations that limit access for the broader stroke population. Body weight supported treadmill training therapy has significant labour requirements, requires specialized equipment, and is typically only available in restricted environments such as in rehabilitation centers [6, 7]. In addition, body weight supported treadmill training offers no additional benefit over conventional physical therapy, as demonstrated in a large randomized clinical trial [2]. A more cost-effective and generally accessible protocol based upon a device (e.g., arm and leg ergometer or a recumbent stepper) that could be more readily used in therapy would be of great benefit where less training is required for physical therapists to supervise training and participants may be more likely to comply with a community-based training regimen [2, 8].

In addition to finding a rehabilitation program that is widely accessible, exploiting the neural and mechanical linkages between the arms and legs that are inherent parts of human locomotion could enhance the recovery of walking [6, 9, 10]. Therefore, incorporating rhythmic arm movement paradigms for locomotor rehabilitation, such as with arm and leg (A&L) cycling, could be very beneficial to stroke locomotor recovery. Although there are differences in kinematics, balance requirements, and loading of the arms between walking and A&L cycling, this type of training activates similar neural networks that are engaged during walking [11]. We have recently shown that, even following a stroke, neural commonalities between A&L cycling and walking persist, despite altered descending supraspinal input from the stroke lesion [12]. Given that A&L cycling and walking share common neural elements and that this persists following stroke, there is a reasonable basis for expectation of training transfer to improve walking.

The extent to which A&L cycling training can lead to training adaptations which transfer to improved walking function remains untested. Thus, the objective of this project was to test the efficacy of A&L cycling training to enhance walking after stroke. Given that A&L cycling and walking share a common core of subcortical regulation, we hypothesize that A&L cycling training will transfer to an improvement in walking. Improvements in walking function were gauged by changes in clinical walking status, strength, and walking performance. If indirect training with A&L cycling does improve walking function, this adjunct therapy could be used as an additional modality to improve walking ability after stroke.

Continue —> Exploiting Interlimb Arm and Leg Connections for Walking Rehabilitation: A Training Intervention in Stroke

, , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: