Posts Tagged lower limb

[Abstract] OnabotulinumtoxinA for the Treatment of Post-Stroke Distal Lower-Limb Spasticity: A Randomized Trial

Abstract

Background

Post-stroke distal lower limb spasticity impairs mobility, limiting activities of daily living, requiring additional caregiver time.

Objective

To evaluate the efficacy, safety, and sustained benefit of onabotulinumtoxinA in adults with post-stroke lower limb spasticity (PSLLS).

Design

A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, phase 3, placebo-controlled trial.

Setting

60 study centers across North America, Europe, Russia the United Kingdom, and South Korea.

Patients

Adult patients (18 to 65 years of age) with PSLLS (Modified Ashworth Scale [MAS] ≥3) of the ankle plantar flexors and the most recent stroke ≥3 months prior to study enrollment. .

Interventions

During the open-label phase, patients received ≤3 onabotulinumtoxinA treatments (≤400 U) or placebo at approximately 12-week intervals. Treatments were into the ankle plantar flexors (onabotulinumtoxinA 300 U into ankle plantar flexors; ≤100 U, optional lower limb muscles).

Main Outcome Measurements

The double-blind primary endpoint was MAS change from baseline (average score at weeks 4 and 6). Secondary measures included physician-assessed Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGI), MAS change from baseline in optional muscles, Goal Attainment Scale (GAS), and pain scale.

Results

Of 468 patients enrolled, 450 (96%) completed the double-blind phase and 413 (88%) completed the study. Small improvements in MAS observed with onabotulinumtoxinA during the double-blind phase (onabotulinumtoxinA, –0.8; placebo, –0.6, P=0.01) were further enhanced with additional treatments through week 6 of the third open-label treatment cycle (onabotulinumtoxinA/onabotulinumtoxinA, –1.2; placebo/onabotulinumtoxinA, –1.4). Small improvements in CGI observed during the double-blind phase (onabotulinumtoxinA, 0.9; placebo, 0.7, P=0.01) were also further enhanced through week 6 of the third open-label treatment cycle (onabotulinumtoxinA/onabotulinumtoxinA, 1.6; placebo/onabotulinumtoxinA, 1.6). Physician- and patient-assessed GAS scores improved with each subsequent treatment. No new safety signals emerged.

Conclusions

OnabotulinumtoxinA significantly improved ankle MAS, CGI, and GAS scores compared with placebo; improvements were consistent and increased with repeated treatments of onabotulinumtoxinA over 1 year in patients with PSLLS.

 

via OnabotulinumtoxinA for the Treatment of Post-Stroke Distal Lower-Limb Spasticity: A Randomized Trial – PM&R

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[ARTICLE] A systematic review: efficacy of botulinum toxin in walking and quality of life in post-stroke lower limb spasticity – Full Text

Abstract

Background

Improved walking is one of the highest priorities in people living with stroke. Post-stroke lower limb spasticity (PSLLS) impedes walking and quality of life (QOL). The understanding of the evidence of improved walking and QOL following botulinum toxin (BoNTA) injection is not clear. We performed a systematic review of the randomized control trials (RCT) to evaluate the effectiveness of BoNTA injection on walking and QOL in PSLLS.

Methods

We searched PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, CINAHL, ProQuest Thesis and Dissertation checks, Google Scholar, WHO International Clinical Trial Registry Platform, ClinicalTrials.gov, Cochrane, and ANZ and EU Clinical Trials Register for RCTs looking at improvement in walking and QOL following injection of BoNTA in PSLLS. The original search was carried out prior to 16 September 2015. We conducted an additional verifying search on CINHAL, EMBASE, and MEDLINE (via PubMed) from 16 September 2015 to 6 June 2017 using the same clauses as the previous search. Methodological quality of the individual studies was critically appraised using Joanna Briggs Institute’s instrument. Only placebo-controlled RCTs looking at improvement in walking and QOL were included in the review.

Results

Of 2026 records, we found 107 full-text records. Amongst them, we found five RCTs qualifying our criteria. No new trials were found from the verifying search. Two independent reviewers assessed methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using Joanna Briggs Institute’s appraisal instrument. Two studies reported significant improvement in gait velocity (p = 0.020) and < 0.05, respectively. One study showed significant improvement in 2-min-walking distance (p < 0.05). QOL was recorded in one study without any significant improvement. Meta-analysis of reviewed studies could not be performed because of different methods of assessing walking ability, small sample size with large confidence interval and issues such as lack of power calculations in some studies. Findings from our systematic and detailed study identify the need for a well-designed RCT to adequately investigate the issues highlighted.

Conclusions

This review could not conclude there was sufficient evidence to support or refute improvement on walking or QOL following BoNTA injection. Reasons for this are discussed, and methods for future RCTs are developed.

Background

Stroke is a common cause of adult disability worldwide [1]. More than two thirds of the stroke survivors develop post-stroke sequelae including impaired motor functions and spasticity [2]. The prevalence of post-stroke spasticity ranges from 19.0 to 42.6% [3]. There have been many recent developments in diagnosis, management, and prevention of stroke, while advances in rehabilitation have been modest [4]. There has, however, been progress with the use of botulinum toxin (BoNTA) as a treatment to improve spasticity in the upper limb [567]. Three systematic reviews [8910] have addressed research progress on both the upper and lower limbs, with the conclusion from two of these that the effect on the upper and lower limbs spasticity favored BoNTA [89]; however, these reviews did not fulfill the criteria for inclusion in this study.

As far as the lower limb is concerned, improvement in spasticity while important is only a first stage in post-stroke improvement, and the aim of RCTs should be to address the more important questions of functional activity including walking. How well this outcome has been addressed is the aim of this study. This is also an important question for many countries to resolve, because to date, botulinum toxin A is not approved for use in the post-stroke lower limb spasticity (PSLLS) by the pharmaceutical authorities except in the USA [11].

Lower limb spasticity most commonly involves the foot and the ankle leading to equinovarus (plantarflexion and inversion) deformity. Post-stroke patients with equinovarus deformity fail to achieve optimal contact with the ground leading to a poor stance, loss of heel to toe rhythm while walking and post-stroke patients walk predominantly with plantarflexion/inversion of the foot. Transfers and walking are essentially bipedal activity involving phases like balancing on one leg and swinging the other leg forward. The awkward position of the foot in addition to spasticity impairs balance, transfer, stride, gait, and mobility, besides causing spasm and pain. In many cases, complications like falls, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, and pressure ulcers may also result [12]. Inability to walk is associated with loss of independence and premature residential aged care placement [1314] and in the older population contributes substantially to adverse health outcomes including activities of daily living and mortality [15]. Improving and maintaining walking ability and activities of daily living are therefore vital for post-stroke survivors [16] and a major contributor to functional improvements. The overall human and economic cost of spasticity is, therefore, considerable, and interventions potentially can deliver significant benefits [17].

Given the evidence for efficacy of BoNTA in reducing spasticity, the objective of this review was to assess the available evidence of BoNTA injection: (1) to improve mobility (using gait velocity and walking distance as measuring parameters) and quality of life (QOL) and (2) to make appropriate recommendations for further research regarding these questions. […]

 

Continue —> A systematic review: efficacy of botulinum toxin in walking and quality of life in post-stroke lower limb spasticity | Systematic Reviews | Full Text

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[Abstract] Effect of activity-based mirror therapy on lower limb motor-recovery and gait in stroke: A randomised controlled trial

Objective: To determine the effect of activity-based mirror therapy (MT) on motor recovery and gait in chronic poststroke hemiparetic subjects.

Design: A randomised, controlled, assessor-blinded trial.

Setting: Rehabilitation institute.

Participants: Thirty-six chronic poststroke (15.89 ± 9.01 months) hemiparetic subjects (age: 46.44 ± 7.89 years, 30 men and functional ambulation classification of median level 3).

Interventions: Activity-based MT comprised movements such as ball-rolling, rocker-board, and pedalling. The activities were provided on the less-affected side in front of the mirror while hiding the affected limb. The movement of the less-affected lower limb was projected as over the affected limb. Conventional motor therapy based on neurophysiological approaches was also provided to the experimental group. The control group received only conventional management.

Main outcome measures: Brunnstrom recovery stages (BRS), Fugl-Meyer assessment lower extremity (FMA-LE), Rivermead visual gait assessment (RVGA), and 10-metre walk test (10-MWT).

Results: Postintervention, the experimental group exhibited significant and favourable changes for FMA-LE (mean difference = 3.29, 95% CI = 1.23–5.35, p = .003) and RVGA (mean difference = 5.41, 95% CI = 1.12–9.71, p = .015) in comparison to the control group. No considerable changes were observed on 10-MWT.

Conclusions: Activity-based MT facilitates motor recovery of the lower limb as well as reduces gait deviations among chronic poststroke hemiparetic subjects.

 

via Effect of activity-based mirror therapy on lower limb motor-recovery and gait in stroke: A randomised controlled trial: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation: Vol 0, No 0

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[ARTICLE] Assessment of the correlations between gait speed in post-stroke patients and the time from stroke onset, the level of motor control in the paretic lower limb, proprioception, visual field impairment and functional independence – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Introduction: Gait recovery is one of the main objectives in the rehabilitation of post-stroke patients. The study aim was to assess the correlations between gait speed in post-stroke hemiparetic patients and the level of motor control in the paretic lower limb, the time from stroke onset, the subjects’ age as well as the impairment of proprioception and visual field.

Materials and methods: This retrospective study was performed at the Clinical Rehabilitation Ward of the Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow. The study group consisted of 600 patients after a first stroke who walked independently. The measurements focused on gait speed assessed in a 10-meter walking test, motor control in the lower limb according to Brunnström recovery stages, proprioception in lower limbs, visual field as well as functional independence according to The Barthel Index.

Results: The study revealed a slight negative correlation between gait speed and the subjects’ age (r = − 0.25). No correlation was found between mean gait speed and the time from stroke onset. On the other hand, gait speed strongly correlated both with the level of motor control in the lower limb (p = 0.0008) and the incidence of impaired proprioception. Additionally, a strong statistically significant correlation between the patients’ gait speed and the level of functional independence was found with the use of The Barthel Index.

Conclusions: The level of motor control in the paretic lower limb and proprioception are vital factors affecting gait speed and functional independence. Patients with a higher level of functional independence demonstrated higher gait speed.

References

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  • 7. Dobkin BH. Short-distance walking speed and timed walking distance: redundant measures for clinical trials? Neurology 2006;66(4):584-6.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
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  • 12. Schmid A, Duncan PW, Studenski S, et al. Improvements in speed-based gait classifications are meaningful. Stroke 2007;38(7):2096-100.Web of ScienceCrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • 13. Hsu A-L, Tang P-F, Jan M-H. Analysis of impairments influencing gait velocity and asymmetry of hemiplegic patients after mild to moderate stroke. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2003;84(8):1185-93.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • 14. Nadeau S, Arsenault AB, Gravel D, Bourbonnais D. Analysis of the clinical factors determining natural and maximal gait speeds in adults with a stroke. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 1999;78(2):123-30.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
  • 15. Collen FM, Wade DT, Bradshaw CM. Mobility after stroke: reliability of measures of impairment and disability. IntDisabil Stud 1990;12(1):6-9.Google Scholar
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  • 17. Mahoney FI, The Barthel DW. Functional evaluation: the The Barthel Index. Md State Med J 1965;14:61-5.Google Scholar
  • 18. Kwakkel G, Kollen B J, R C Wagenaar R C. Long term effects of intensity of upper and lower limb training after stroke: a randomised trial. J NeurolNeurosurg Psychiatry 2002;72(4):473-9.Google Scholar
  • 19. Taylor-Piliae RE, Latt LD, Hepworth JT, Coull BM. Predictors of gait velocity among community-dwelling stroke survivors. Gait Posture 2012;35(3):395-9.CrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar
  • 20. Kollen B, Kwakkel G, Lindeman E. Longitudinal robustness of variables predicting independent gait following severe middle cerebral artery stroke: a prospective cohort study. ClinRehabil 2006;20(3):262-8.Google Scholar
  • 21. Bohannon RW, Walsh S. Nature, reliability, and predictive value of muscle performance measures in patients with hemiparesis following stroke. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73(8):721-5.Google Scholar
  • 22. Dettmann MA, Linder MT, Sepic SB. Relationship among gait performance, postural stability, and function assessments of the hemiplegic patient. Am J Phys Med 1987;66(2):77-90.Google Scholar
  • 23. Michael KM, Allen JK, Macko RF. Reduced ambulatory activity after stroke: the role of balance, gait, and cardiovascular fitness. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2005;86(8):1552-6.CrossrefGoogle Scholar
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via Assessment of the correlations between gait speed in post-stroke patients and the time from stroke onset, the level of motor control in the paretic lower limb, proprioception, visual field impairment and functional independence : Advances in Rehabilitation

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[Abstract] Recent Advances on Lower Limb Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot

Abstract

Background: Lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robot is a bionic robot, which is the product of the combination of medical technology and robot technology, simulating human walking movement. It can be mainly used for rehabilitation training of patients with lower limb dysfunction.

Objective: To provide an overview of recent lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robot and introduce their respective characteristics and development.

Method: A recent lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robot is divided into passive drive, pneumatic drive, hydraulic drive and motor drive. This paper reviews various representative patents related to lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robot. The structural characteristics and applications of the typical lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robots are introduced.

Results: The differences between different types of lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robots are compared and analyzed, and the structural characteristics are concluded. The main problems in its development are analyzed, the development trend is foreseen, and the current and future research of the patents on lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robot is discussed.

Conclusion: There are a lot of patents and articles about the exoskeleton rehabilitation robots, however, if these problems can be solved, such as small size, light weight and high power output are solved at the same time, the consistency with human body will be advanced, with the combination of traditional rehabilitation medicine. It will be possible to maximize the rehabilitation of the lower limbs.

Source: Recent Advances on Lower Limb Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot: Ingenta Connect

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[Abstract] EEG-guided robotic mirror therapy system for lower limb rehabilitation – IEEE Conference Publication

Abstract:

Lower extremity function recovery is one of the most important goals in stroke rehabilitation. Many paradigms and technologies have been introduced for the lower limb rehabilitation over the past decades, but their outcomes indicate a need to develop a complementary approach. One attempt to accomplish a better functional recovery is to combine bottom-up and top-down approaches by means of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In this study, a BCI-controlled robotic mirror therapy system is proposed for lower limb recovery following stroke. An experimental paradigm including four states is introduced to combine robotic training (bottom-up) and mirror therapy (top-down) approaches. A BCI system is presented to classify the electroencephalography (EEG) evidence. In addition, a probabilistic model is presented to assist patients in transition across the experiment states based on their intent. To demonstrate the feasibility of the system, both offline and online analyses are performed for five healthy subjects. The experiment results show a promising performance for the system, with average accuracy of 94% in offline and 75% in online sessions.

Source: EEG-guided robotic mirror therapy system for lower limb rehabilitation – IEEE Conference Publication

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[Abstract+References] A Review of Upper and Lower Limb Rehabilitation Training Robot – Conference paper

Abstract

With the aging of society, the number of patients with limb disorders caused by stroke has increased year by year, it is necessary to introduce more advanced technology into the field of rehabilitation treatment. Rehabilitation training based on the brain plasticity has been proved by clinical medical practice as an effective treatment method, and because of the serious lack of professional rehabilitation therapists, a large number of rehabilitation training robot have been designed so far. This article analyzed and described the research status on upper and lower limbs rehabilitation training robot, and at last the paper forecasts the future development trend of rehabilitation robot.

Source: A Review of Upper and Lower Limb Rehabilitation Training Robot | SpringerLink

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[Abstract] Use of Lower-Limb Robotics to Enhance Practice and Participation in Individuals With Neurological Conditions

Purpose: To review lower-limb technology currently available for people with neurological disorders, such as spinal cord injury, stroke, or other conditions. We focus on 3 emerging technologies: treadmill-based training devices, exoskeletons, and other wearable robots.

Summary of Key Points: Efficacy for these devices remains unclear, although preliminary data indicate that specific patient populations may benefit from robotic training used with more traditional physical therapy. Potential benefits include improved lower-limb function and a more typical gait trajectory.

Statement of Conclusions: Use of these devices is limited by insufficient data, cost, and in some cases size of the machine. However, robotic technology is likely to become more prevalent as these machines are enhanced and able to produce targeted physical rehabilitation.

Recommendations for Clinical Practice: Therapists should be aware of these technologies as they continue to advance but understand the limitations and challenges posed with therapeutic/mobility robots.

Source: Use of Lower-Limb Robotics to Enhance Practice and Participa… : Pediatric Physical Therapy

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[BLOG POST] Get Back On Your Feet with Exercises for Foot Drop – Saebo

Foot drop (sometimes called drop foot or dropped foot) is the inability to raise the front of the foot due to weakness or paralysis of the muscles and nerves that lift the foot. Foot drop itself is not a disease, it is a symptom of a greater problem or medical condition.

You can recognize foot drop by how it affects your gait. Someone with foot drop may drag their toes along the ground when walking because they cannot lift the front of their foot with each step. In order to avoid dragging their toes or tripping they might lift their knee higher or swing their leg in a wide arc instead. This is called steppage gait, and is a coping mechanism for foot drop issues.

Causes of Foot Drop

There are three main causes of the weakened nerves or muscles that lead to foot drop:

1: Nerve Injury. The peroneal nerve is the nerve that communicates to the muscles that lift the foot. Damage to the peroneal nerve is the most common cause of foot drop. The nerve wraps from the back of the knee to the front of the shin and sits closely to the surface, making it easy to damage. Damage to the peroneal nerve can be caused by sports injuries, hip or knee replacement surgery, a leg cast, childbirth or even crossing your legs.

2: Muscle Disorders. A condition that causes the muscles to slowly weaken or deteriorate can also cause foot drop. These disorders may include muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease) and polio.

3: Brain or Spinal Disorders. Neurological conditions can also cause foot drop. Conditions may include stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS), cerebral palsy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

How Foot Drop is Treated

Treatment for foot drop requires treating the underlying medical condition that caused it. In some cases foot drop can be permanent, but many people are able to recover. There are a number of treatments that can help with foot drop:

1: Surgery

If your foot drop is caused by a pinched nerve or herniated disc then you will likely have surgery to treat it. Surgery may also be necessary to repair muscles or tendons if they were directly damaged and are causing foot drop. In severe or long term cases, you might have surgery to fuse your ankle and foot bones and improve your gait.

2: Functional Electrical Stimulation

If your foot drop is being caused by damage to the peroneal nerve than Functional Electrical Stimulation may be an alternative to surgery. A small device can be worn or surgically implanted just below the knee that will stimulate the normal function of the nerve, causing the muscle to contract and the foot to lift while walking.

3: Braces or Ankle Foot Orthosis (AFO)

Wearing a brace or AFO that supports the foot in a normal position is a common treatment for foot drop. The device will stabilize your foot and ankle and hold the front part of the foot up when walking. While traditionally doctors have prescribed bulky stiff splints that go inside the shoe, the SaeboStep is a lightweight and cost effective option that provides support outside the shoe.

4: Physical Therapy

Therapy to strengthen the foot, ankle, and lower leg muscles is the primary treatment for foot drop and will generally be prescribed in addition to the treatment options mentioned above. Stretching and range of motion exercises will also help prevent stiffness from developing in the heel.

 

Rehabilitation Exercises for Foot Drop

Specific exercises that strengthen the muscles in the foot, ankle and lower leg can help improve the symptoms of foot drop in some cases. Exercises are important for improving range of motion, preventing injury, improving balance and gait, and preventing muscle stiffness.

When treating foot drop, you may work with a physical therapist who will help you get started strengthening your foot, leg and ankle muscles. Rehabilitation for foot drop can be a slow process, so your physical therapist will likely recommend that you continue to do strengthening exercises at home on your own.

By being consistent about your exercises at home, you can maximize your chances of making a successful recovery from foot drop. Strengthening the weakened muscles will allow you to restore normal function and hopefully start walking normally again.

Like any exercise program, please consult your healthcare professional before you begin. Please stop immediately if any of the following exercises cause pain or harm to your body. It’s best to work with a trained professional for guidance and safety.

Towel Stretch

1-towel-stretch

Sit on the floor with both legs straight out in front of you. Loop a towel or exercise band around the affected foot and hold onto the ends with your hands. Pull the towel or band towards your body. Hold for 30 seconds. Then relax for 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

Toe to Heel Rocks

2-toe-heel-rocks

Stand in front of a table, chair, wall, or another sturdy object you can hold onto for support. Rock your weight forward and rise up onto your toes. Hold this position for 5 seconds. Next, rock your weight backwards onto your heels and lift your toes off the ground. Hold for 5 seconds. Repeat the sequence 6 times.

Marble Pickup

3-marble-pickup

Sit in a chair with both feet flat on the floor. Place 20 marbles and a bowl on the floor in front of you. Using the toes of your affected foot, pick up each marble and place it in the bowl. Repeat until you have picked up all the marbles.

Ankle Dorsiflexion

4-ankle-dorsiflexion

Sit on the floor with both legs straight out in front of you. Take a resistance band and anchor it to a stable chair or table leg. Wrap the loop of the band around the top of your affected foot. Slowly pull your toes towards you then return to your starting position. Repeat 10 times.

Plantar Flexion

5-plantar-flexion

Sit on the floor with both legs straight out in front of you. Take a resistance band and wrap it around the bottom of your foot. Hold both ends in your hands. Slowly point your toes then return to your starting position. Repeat 10 times.

Ball Lift

6-ball-lift

Sit in a chair with both feet flat on the floor. Place a small round object on the floor in front of you (about the size of a tennis ball). Hold the object between your feet and slowly lift it by extending your legs. Hold for 5 seconds then slowly lower. Repeat 10 times.

Get Back On Your Feet

Don’t let foot drop affect your mobility, independence, and quality of life. With proper rehabilitation and assistive devices many people are able to overcome the underlying cause of their symptoms and get back to walking normally. If you are showing symptoms of foot drop, talk to a medical professional about your treatment options.

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All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

Source: Get Back On Your Feet with Exercises for Foot Drop | Saebo

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[Abstract] Effects of mirror therapy combined with neuromuscular electrical stimulation on motor recovery of lower limbs and walking ability of patients with stroke: a randomized controlled study 

To investigate the effectiveness of mirror therapy combined with neuromuscular electrical stimulation in promoting motor recovery of the lower limbs and walking ability in patients suffering from foot drop after stroke.

Randomized controlled study.

Inpatient rehabilitation center of a teaching hospital.

Sixty-nine patients with foot drop.

Patients were randomly divided into three groups: control, mirror therapy, and mirror therapy + neuromuscular electrical stimulation. All groups received interventions for 0.5 hours/day and five days/week for four weeks.

10-Meter walk test, Brunnstrom stage of motor recovery of the lower limbs, Modified Ashworth Scale score of plantar flexor spasticity, and passive ankle joint dorsiflexion range of motion were assessed before and after the four-week period.

After four weeks of intervention, Brunnstrom stage (P = 0.04), 10-meter walk test (P < 0.05), and passive range of motion (P < 0.05) showed obvious improvements between patients in the mirror therapy and control groups. Patients in the mirror therapy + neuromuscular electrical stimulation group showed better results than those in the mirror therapy group in the 10-meter walk test (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in spasticity between patients in the two intervention groups. However, compared with patients in the control group, patients in the mirror therapy + neuromuscular electrical stimulation group showed a significant decrease in spasticity (P < 0.001).

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Source: Effects of mirror therapy combined with neuromuscular electrical stimulation on motor recovery of lower limbs and walking ability of patients with stroke: a randomized controlled studyClinical Rehabilitation – Qun Xu, Feng Guo, Hassan M Abo Salem, Hong Chen, Xiaolin Huang, 2017

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