Posts Tagged lower limb

[Abstract] Stepping training with external feedback relating to lower limb support ability effectively improved complex motor activity in ambulatory patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial

 

BACKGROUND: Lower limb support ability is important for steady and efficient mobility, but previous data commonly involved training during double stance positions, with or without external feedback, using a complex and costly machine.
AIM: To compare the effects of stepping training with or without external feedback in relation to the lower limb support ability of the affected limb on the functional ability necessary for independence in individuals with stroke.
DESIGN: A single-blinded, randomised controlled trial.
SETTING: Tertiary rehabilitation centres.
POPULATION: Ambulatory participants with stroke who walked independently over at least 10 meters with or without walking devices.
METHODS: Thirty-six participants were randomly arranged to be involved in a program of stepping training with or without external feedback related to the lower limb support ability of the affected limb (18 participants/group) for 30 minutes, followed by overground walking training for 10 minutes, 5 days/week over 4 weeks. The outcomes, including the lower limb support ability of the affected legs during stepping, functional ability and spatial walking data, were assessed prior to training, immediately after the first training session, and after 2- and 4- week training.
RESULTS: Participants demonstrated significant improvement in the amount of lower limb support ability, immediately after the first training with external feedback. Then, these participants showed further improvement in both the amount and duration of lower limb support ability, as well as the timed up and go data after 2 and 4 weeks of training (p < 0.05). This improvement was not found following control training.
CONCLUSIONS: The external feedback relating to lower limb support ability during stepping training effectively improved the movement stability and complex motor activity of ambulatory individuals with stroke who had long post-stroke time (approximately 3 years).
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Stepping training protocols and feedback can be easily applied in various settings using the amount of body-weight from an upright digital bathroom scale. Thus, the findings offer an alternative rehabilitation strategy for clinical, community and home-based settings for stroke individuals.

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via Stepping training with external feedback relating to lower limb support ability effectively improved complex motor activity in ambulatory patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial – European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2019 Oct 15 – Minerva Medica – Journals

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[Abstract] Ergometer training in stroke rehabilitation: systematic review and meta-analysis

Abstract

Objective

Ergometer training is routinely used in stroke rehabilitation. How robust is the evidence of its effects?

Data source

The PubMed database and PEDro database were reviewed prior to 22/01/2019.

Study selection

Randomized controlled trials investigating the effects of ergometer training on stroke recovery were selected.

Data extraction

Two reviewers independently selected the studies, performed independent data extraction, and assessed the risk of bias.

Data synthesis

A total of 28 studies (including 1115 stroke subjects) were included. The data indicates that

(1) ergometer training leads to a significant improvement of walking ability, cardiorespiratory fitness, motor function and muscular force of lower limbs, balance and postural control, spasticity, cognitive abilities, as well as the brain’s resistance to damage and degeneration,

(2) neuromuscular functional electrical stimulation assisted ergometer training is more efficient than ergometer training alone,

(3) high-intensity ergometer training is more efficient that low-intensity ergometer training, and

(4) ergometer training is more efficient than other therapies in supporting cardiorespiratory fitness, independence in activities of daily living, and balance and postural control, but less efficient in improving walking ability.

Conclusion

Ergometer training can support motor recovery after stroke. However, current data is insufficient for evidence-based rehabilitation. More data is required about the effects of ergometer training on cognitive abilities, emotional status, and quality of life in stroke subjects.

via Ergometer training in stroke rehabilitation: systematic review and meta-analysis – Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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[Abstract] A Method for Self-Service Rehabilitation Training of Human Lower Limbs – IEEE Conference Publication

Abstract

Recently, rehabilitation robot technologies have been paid more attention by the researchers in the fields of rehabilitation medicine engineering and robotics. To assist active rehabilitation of patients with unilateral lower extremity injury, we propose a new self-service rehabilitation training method in which the injured lower limbs are controlled by using the contralateral healthy upper ones. First, the movement data of upper and lower limbs of a healthy person in normal walk are acquired by gait measurement experiments. Second, the eigenvectors of upper and lower limb movements in a cycle are extracted in turn. Third, the linear relationship between the movement of upper and lower limbs is identified using the least squares method. Finally, the results of simulation experiments show that the established linear mapping can achieve good accuracy and adaptability, and the self-service rehabilitation training method is effective.

via A Method for Self-Service Rehabilitation Training of Human Lower Limbs – IEEE Conference Publication

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[Abstract] Effect of functional electrical stimulation plus body weight-supported treadmill training for gait rehabilitation in patients with poststroke – a retrospective case-matched study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Functional electrical stimulation (FES) plus body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) provide effective gait training for poststroke patients with abnormal gait. These features promote a successful active motor relearning of ambulation in stroke survivors.

AIM:

This is a retrospective study to assess the effect of FES plus BWSTT for gait rehabilitation in patients poststroke.

DESIGN:

A retrospective case-matched study.

SETTING:

Participants were recruited from a rehabilitation department in an acute university-affiliated hospital.

POPULATION:

Ninety patients poststroke from Yue Bei People’s Hospital underwent BWSTT (A: control group) were compared to an equal number of cross-matched patients who received FES plus BWSTT (B: FES plus BWSTT group).

METHODS:

While B group received FES for 45 minutes plus BSWTT for 30 minutes in the program, group A received time-matched BWSTT alone. The walking speed, step length, step cadence, Fugl-Meyer lower-limb scale (LL-FMA), composite spasticity scale (CSS), 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT), Tinetti Balance Test (TBT) and nerve physiology testing were collected before and after intervention.

RESULTS:

One hundred and eighty patients with poststroke abnormal gait were chosen. There were significant differences in walking speed, step length, step cadence, LL-FMA, CSS, TBT, and 10MWT between baseline and post-intervention (P<0.05). There were significant differences in walking speed, step length, step cadence, LL-FMA, CSS, TBT, and 10MWT between two groups at the end of the eighth week (P<0.05), but not at baseline (P>0.05). In comparison with group A, the peak of somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude increased, the latency was shortened, and the conduction velocity of sensory nerve (SCV) and motor nerve (MCV) was significantly increased in the group B (P < 0.05). No adverse events occurred during the study.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests that FES plus BWSTT could be more effective than BWSTT alone in the improvement of gait, balance, spasticity, and function of the lower limb in patients poststroke.

CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT:

Introduce effective rehabilitation strategies for poststroke patients with abnormal gait.

 

via Effect of functional electrical stimulation plus body weight-supported treadmill training for gait rehabilitation in patients with poststroke-a ret… – PubMed – NCBI

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[WEB PAGE] Dysport is Now Approved for Upper Limb Spasticity as Well

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The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the use of Dysport (abobotulinumtoxinA) for injection to include the treatment of upper limb spasticity in children two years of age and older, excluding spasticity caused by cerebral palsy (CP), Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals, an affiliate of Ipsen, announces in a news release.

This approval makes Dysport the first botulinum toxin approved by the FDA for both pediatric spasticity indications, following the previous approval to treat children with lower limb spasticity aged two and older received in July 2016.

“For physicians, it is reassuring to have a botulinum toxin treatment in Dysport which demonstrated sustained symptom relief for spasticity, which can be physically challenging for children,” says Ann Tilton, MD, study investigator and Professor of Clinical Neurology at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans, in the release.

“This FDA decision for Dysport means we now have an approved therapy to offer children and adolescents seeking improvements in mobility in both upper and lower limbs.”

The approval is based on a Phase 3 study with children aged two to 17 years old being treated for upper limb spasticity. Due to Orphan Drug Exclusivity, this approval excludes use in children with upper limb spasticity caused by CP. Dysport demonstrated statistically significant improvements from baseline at Week 6 with doses of 8 Units/kg and 16 Units/kg vs. 2 Units/kg, as measured by the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in the elbow or wrist flexors.

Dysport demonstrated a reduction in spasticity symptoms through 12 weeks for most children for both upper and lower limbs. In the upper limb study, a majority of patients were retreated between 16-28 weeks; however, some patients had a longer duration of response (ie, 34 weeks or more). The most frequent adverse reactions observed were upper respiratory tract infection and pharyngitis, the release explains.

“This approval is a testament to Ipsen’s legacy in neurotoxin research and continued commitment to advancing patient care,” states Kimberly Baldwin, Vice President, Franchise Head, Neuroscience Business Unit, Ipsen. “We believe the data for both pediatric upper and lower limb spasticity underscore the role of Dysport as an important treatment option for patients seeking long-lasting spasticity symptom relief.”

For more information, visit Ipsen.

[Source(s): Ipsen, Business Wire]

 

via Dysport is Now Approved for Upper Limb Spasticity as Well – Rehab Managment

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[Abstract + References] A Wireless BCI-FES Based on Motor Intent for Lower Limb Rehabilitation

Abstract

Recent investigations have proposed brain computer interfaces combined with functional electrical stimulation as a novel approach for upper limb motor recovery. These systems could detect motor intention movement as a power decrease of the sensorimotor rhythms in the electroencephalography signal, even in people with damaged brain cortex. However, these systems use a large number of electrodes and wired communication to be employed for gait rehabilitation. In this paper, the design and development of a wireless brain computer interface combined with functional electrical stimulation aimed at lower limb motor recovery is presented. The design requirements also account the dynamic of a rehabilitation therapy by allowing the therapist to adapt the system during the session. A preliminary evaluation of the system in a subject with right lower limb motor impairment due to multiple sclerosis was conducted and as a performance metric, the true positive rate was computed. The developed system evidenced a robust wireless communication and was able to detect lower limb motor intention. The mean of the performance metric was 75%. The results encouraged the possibility of testing the developed system in a gait rehabilitation clinical study.

References

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    Pfurtscheller, G., Mcfarland, D.: BCIs that use sensorimotor rhythms. In: Wolpaw, J.R., Wolpaw, E. (eds.) Brain-Computer Interfaces: Principles and Practice, pp. 227–240. Oxford University Press (2012)Google Scholar
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    Carrere, L.C., Tabernig, C.B.: Detection of foot motor imagery using the coefficient of determination for neurorehabilitation based on BCI technology. IFMBE Proc. 49, 944–947 (2015).  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-13117-7_239CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Sannelli, C., Vidaurre, C., Müller, K.R., Blankertz, B.: A large scale screening study with a SMR-based BCI: categorization of BCI users and differences in their SMR activity (2019)Google Scholar
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    Do, A.H., Wang, P.T., King, C.E., Schombs, A., Cramer, S.C., Nenadic, Z.: Brain-computer interface controlled functional electrical stimulation device for foot drop due to stroke, pp. 6414–6417 (2012)Google Scholar
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    Ramos-Murguialday, A., Broetz, D., Rea, M., Yilmaz, Ö., Brasil, F.L., Liberati, G., Marco, R., Garcia-cossio, E., Vyziotis, A., Cho, W., Cohen, L.G., Birbaumer, N.: Brain-Machine-interface in chronic stroke rehabilitation: a controlled study. Ann. Neurol. 74, 100–108 (2014).  https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.23879.Brain-Machine-InterfaceCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Biasiucci, A., Leeb, R., Iturrate, I., Perdikis, S., Al-Khodairy, A., Corbet, T., Schnider, A., Schmidlin, T., Zhang, H., Bassolino, M., Viceic, D., Vuadens, P., Guggisberg, A.G., Millán, J.D.R.: Brain-actuated functional electrical stimulation elicits lasting arm motor recovery after stroke. Nat. Commun. 9, 1–13 (2018).  https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-04673-zCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Tabernig, C.B., Lopez, C.A., Carrere, L.C., Spaich, E.G., Ballario, C.H.: Neurorehabilitation therapy of patients with severe stroke based on functional electrical stimulation commanded by a brain computer interface. J. Rehabil. Assist. Technol. Eng. 5, 205566831878928 (2018).  https://doi.org/10.1177/2055668318789280CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    McCrimmon, C.M., King, C.E., Wang, P.T., Cramer, S.C., Nenadic, Z., Do, A.H.: Brain-controlled functional electrical stimulation therapy for gait rehabilitation after stroke: a safety study. J. Neuroeng. Rehabil. 12 (2015).  https://doi.org/10.1186/s12984-015-0050-4
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    g.Nautilus wireless biosignal acquisition Homepage. http://www.gtec.at/Products/Hardware-and-Accessories/g.Nautilus-Specs-Features
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    Emotiv EpocFlex flexible wireless EEG system Homepage. https://www.emotiv.com/epoc-flex/
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    Vuckovic, A., Wallace, L., Allan, D.: Hybrid brain-computer interface and functional electrical stimulation for sensorimotor training in participants with tetraplegia: a proof-of-concept study. J. Neurol. Phys. Ther. 39, 3–14 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Schalk, G., McFarland, D.J., Hinterberger, T., Birbaumer, N., Wolpaw, J.R.: BCI2000: a general-purpose brain-computer interface (BCI) system. IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 51, 1034–1043 (2004).  https://doi.org/10.1109/TBME.2004.827072CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    McCrimmon, C.M., Fu, J.L., Wang, M., Lopes, L.S., Wang, P.T., Karimi-Bidhendi, A., Liu, C.Y., Heydari, P., Nenadic, Z., Do, A.H.: Performance assessment of a custom, portable, and low-cost brain-computer interface platform. IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 64, 2313–2320 (2017).  https://doi.org/10.1109/TBME.2017.2667579CrossRefGoogle Scholar

via A Wireless BCI-FES Based on Motor Intent for Lower Limb Rehabilitation | SpringerLink

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[Abstract] Design and Implementation of a Wearable Device for Motivating Patients With Upper and/or Lower Limb Disability Via Gaming and Home Rehabilitation

Abstract

Stroke survivors often suffer from a permanent or partial disability that restricts the movement of the hands, arms and/or legs. To help patients recover, rehabilitation should be at an earlier stage of the injury. Without motivation, it would be challenging for patients to successfully engage in the recovery process which can sometimes be painful of inconvenient. The application of wearable devices, games and Internet-of-Things (IoT) can create a motivating atmosphere to facilitate the rehabilitation process of patients while enabling remote monitoring of their health and progress. This paper presents the design and implementation of a rehabilitation system for aimed at helping stroke patients suffering from upper limb disability that exploits IoT by integrating gaming and wearable technology.

via Design and Implementation of a Wearable Device for Motivating Patients With Upper and/or Lower Limb Disability Via Gaming and Home Rehabilitation – IEEE Conference Publication

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[WEB SITE] ReStore™ Exo-Suit – ReWalk – More Than Walking

ReStore Soft Exo-Suit – A Revolution in Post-Stroke Gait Training
What is the ReStore?

The ReStore is a powered, lightweight soft exo-suit intended for use in the rehabilitation of persons with lower limb disability due to stroke. It will be a first of its kind gait training solution.

Functional

The ReStore soft design combines natural movements with plantarflexion and dorsiflexion assistance that adaptively synchronize with the patient’s own gait to facilitate functional gait training.

Versatile

Individualized levels of assistance and compatibility with supplemental support aids ensure that ReStore has broad applications for patients across the gait rehabilitation spectrum.

 

Data-Driven

Real time feedback and adjustable levels of assistance enable the therapist to optimize sessions and track each patient’s progress.

How Does ReStore Compare to Other Stroke Rehabilitation Methods?

Click here to contact us for more information and to discuss bringing ReStore to your clinic. Click here to download the ReStore brochure.

via ReStore™ Exo-Suit – ReWalk – More Than Walking

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[ARTICLE] Sensory retraining of the leg after stroke: systematic review and meta-analysis – Full Text

This systematic review aimed to investigate the effects of interventions intended for retraining leg somatosensory function on somatosensory impairment, and secondary outcomes of balance and gait, after stroke.

Databases searched from inception to 16 January 2019 included Cochrane Library, PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PEDro, PsycINFO, and Scopus. Reference lists of relevant publications were also manually searched.

All types of quantitative studies incorporating interventions that intended to improve somatosensory function in the leg post stroke were retrieved. The Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies was used for quality appraisal. Standardised mean differences were calculated and meta-analyses were performed using preconstructed Microsoft Excel spreadsheets.

The search yielded 16 studies, comprising 430 participants, using a diverse range of interventions. In total, 10 of the included studies were rated weak in quality, 6 were rated moderate, and none was rated strong. Study quality was predominantly affected by high risk of selection bias, lack of blinding, and the use of somatosensory measures that have not been psychometrically evaluated. A significant heterogeneous positive summary effect size (SES) was found for somatosensory outcomes (SES: 0.52; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.04 to 1.01; I2 = 74.48%), which included joint position sense, light touch, and two-point discrimination. There was also a significant heterogeneous positive SES for Berg Balance Scale scores (SES: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.10 to 1.14; I2 = 59.05%). Gait SES, mainly of gait velocity, was not significant.

This review suggests that interventions used for retraining leg somatosensory impairment after stroke significantly improved somatosensory function and balance but not gait.

 

Somatosensory impairment is common after stroke, occurring in up to 89% of stroke survivors.1Proprioception and tactile somatosensation are more impaired in the leg than in the arm post stroke,2 with the frequency increasing with increasing level of weakness and stroke severity.2,3 Leg somatosensory impairment also has a significant impact on independence in daily activities3 and activity participation in stroke survivors,4 as well as predicts longer hospital stays and lower frequency of home discharges.5

Leg somatosensory impairment negatively influences balance and gait. Post-stroke plantar tactile deficits correlate with lower balance scores and greater postural sway in standing.6 Tactile and proprioceptive feedback provide critical information about weight borne through the limb.7 Accordingly, tactile and proprioceptive somatosensory deficits may hinder paretic limb load detection ability, potentially leading to reduced weight-bearing and contributing to balance impairment and falls post stroke.8 Indeed, stroke survivors with somatosensory impairment have a higher falls incidence compared to those without somatosensory impairment.3 In addition to reduced balance, impaired load detection may also contribute to gait asymmetry, particularly in the push-off phase.8 In addition, leg proprioception influences variance in stride length, gait velocity,9 and walking endurance in stroke survivors.10 In fact, leg somatosensory impairment has been shown to be the third most important independent factor for reduced gait velocity in stroke survivors.11

Two systematic reviews have previously investigated the effects of interventions for retraining somatosensory function after stroke.12,13 In the first review, published more than a decade ago, only four of the 14 included studies targeted the leg,12 while the second only included studies of the arm.13 Nevertheless, both reviews reported that there were insufficient data to determine the effectiveness of these interventions. A third systematic review evaluating the effectiveness of proprioceptive training14 only included 16 studies with stroke-specific populations, of which only two specifically addressed the leg. From these three reviews, the effects of interventions for post-stroke leg somatosensory impairment remain unclear. In addition, the first review12 was critiqued for including studies with participants without somatosensory impairment, and that did not report somatosensory outcomes.15 Therefore, a targeted systematic review, addressing the limitations of previous reviews, is required to elucidate the effects of interventions for post-stroke leg somatosensory impairment.

It is of interest to clinicians and researchers to evaluate the effects of leg somatosensory retraining on factors that may ultimately influence activity and participation, as this could change practice. Therefore, this systematic review aimed to examine the effects of post-stroke leg somatosensory retraining on somatosensory impairment, balance, gait, motor impairment, and leg function.[…]

 

Continue —> Sensory retraining of the leg after stroke: systematic review and meta-analysis – Fenny SF Chia, Suzanne Kuys, Nancy Low Choy, 2019

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