Posts Tagged mental health

[REHABDATA] 20 apps for student success – National Rehabilitation Information Center

NARIC Accession Number: O21594.  What’s this? Download article in Full Text .
Author(s): O’Sullivan, Paige.
Project Number: 90RT5021 (formerly H133B130014).
Publication Year: 2017.
Number of Pages: 5.
Abstract: This list identifies software applications (apps) that may be helpful in key areas in which students with and without mental health conditions may need additional support. Some of these apps are only for use on desktops, while most are available on iPhones or Android products.
Descriptor Terms: ACCOMMODATION, ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY, COMPUTER APPLICATIONS, COMPUTER-ASSISTED INSTRUCTION, HEALTH PROMOTION, MENTAL HEALTH, PSYCHIATRIC DISABILITIES, STUDENTS, TELECOMMUNICATIONS.

Can this document be ordered through NARIC’s document delivery service*?: Y.
Get this Document: http://tucollaborative.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/20-Apps-for-Student-Success.pdf.

Citation: O’Sullivan, Paige. (2017). 20 apps for student success. Retrieved 4/19/2019, from REHABDATA database.via Articles, Books, Reports, & Multimedia: Search REHABDATA | National Rehabilitation Information Center

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[WEB SITE] OCD: Brain mechanism explains symptoms

A large review of existing neuroscientific studies unravels the brain circuits and mechanisms that underpin obsessive-compulsive disorder. The researchers hope that the new findings will make existing therapies more effective, “or guide new treatments.”
doctors looking at brain scans

New research analyzes the brain scans of almost 500 people to unravel the brain mechanisms in OCD.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental health condition that affects more than 2 million adults in the United States.

People with OCD often experience recurring, anxiety-inducing thoughts or urges — known as obsessions — or compulsive behaviors that they cannot control.

Whether it is repeatedly checking if the door is locked or switching lights on and off, OCD symptoms are uncontrollable and can severely interfere with a person’s quality of life.

Treatments for OCD include medication, psychotherapy, and deep brain stimulation. However, not everyone responds to treatment.

In fact, reference studies have found that only 50 percent of people with OCD get better with treatment, and just 10 percent recover fully.

This treatment ineffectiveness is partly down to the fact that medical professionals still do not fully understand the neurological roots of the condition. A new study, however, aims to fill this gap in research.

Scientists led by Luke Norman, Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Michigan (U-M) in Ann Arbor, corroborated and analyzed large amounts of data from existing studies on the neurological underpinnings of OCD.

The scientists published their meta-analysis in the journal Biological Psychiatry.

Studying the brain circuitry in OCD

Norman and colleagues analyzed studies that scanned the brains of hundreds of people with OCD, as well as examining the brain images of people without the condition.

“By combining data from 10 studies, and nearly 500 patients and healthy volunteers, we could see how brain circuits long hypothesized to be crucial to OCD are indeed involved in the disorder,” explains the study’s lead author.

Specifically, the researchers zeroed in on a brain circuit called the “cingulo-opercular network.” This network involves several brain regions that are interconnected by neuronal pathways in the center of the brain.

Studies have previously associated the cingulo-opercular network with “tonic alertness” or “vigilance.” In other words, areas in this brain circuit are “on the lookout” for potential errors and can call off an action to avoid an undesirable outcome.

Most of the functional MRI studies included by Norman and colleagues in their review had volunteers respond to errors while inside the brain scanner.

An analysis of data from the various studies revealed a salient pattern: Compared with people who did not have OCD, those with the condition displayed significantly more activity in brain areas associated with recognizing an error, but less activity in the brain regions that could stop an action.

Study co-author Dr. Kate Fitzgerald of U-M’s Department of Psychiatry explains the findings, saying “We know that [people with OCD] often have insight into their behaviors, and can detect that they’re doing something that doesn’t need to be done.”

She adds, “But these results show that the error signal probably isn’t reaching the brain network that needs to be engaged in order for them to stop doing it.”

The researcher continues using an analogy.

It’s like their foot is on the brake telling them to stop, but the brake isn’t attached to the part of the wheel that can actually stop them.”

Dr. Kate Fitzgerald

“This analysis sets the stage for therapy targets in OCD because it shows that error processing and inhibitory control are both important processes that are altered in people with the condition,” says Fitzgerald.

Findings may boost existing treatments

The researcher also explains how the findings may enhance current treatments for OCD, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

“In [CBT] sessions for OCD, we work to help patients identify, confront, and resist their compulsions, to increase communication between the ‘brake’ and the wheels, until the wheels actually stop. But it only works in about half of patients.”

“Through findings like these, we hope we can make CBT more effective, or guide new treatments,” Dr. Fitzgerald adds. The team is currently recruiting participants for a clinical trial of CBT for OCD.

In addition to CBT, Dr. Fitzgerald also hopes that the results will enhance a therapy known as “repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation” (rTMS).

“If we know how brain regions interact together to start and stop OCD symptoms, then we know where to target rTMS,” she says. “This is not some deep dark problem of behavior,” Dr. Fitzgerald continues.

OCD is a medical problem, and not anyone’s fault. With brain imaging, we can study it just like heart specialists study EKGs of their patients — and we can use that information to improve care and the lives of people with OCD.”

Dr. Kate Fitzgerald

via OCD: Brain mechanism explains symptoms

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[WEB SITE] Mental Health is Important. What You Can Do as a Physiotherapist

 

I understand that mental health is an important topic, but what can I do as a physiotherapist?

As health care professionals we are dedicated to improving a person’s well-being. As physiotherapists, we are comfortable within the realm of physical signs and symptoms, while sometimes neglecting the intimate connection between the physical and mental bodily spheres. It is undeniable that the two are mutually influenced, but how proficient are we as clinicians in recognizing and addressing this importance within a clinical setting?

Do you know what outcome measures are available to you for quantifying suspected mental health disturbances? Are you confident with who you should be referring your patients to, for the appropriate type of care? How equipped do you feel as a physiotherapist, with addressing a suspected underlying mental health imbalance with your patient? If you felt uncertain with any of your answers to these questions, you are certainly not alone.

October 10th is World Mental Health Day, which is the perfect opportunity for you to become more familiar with your role as a physiotherapist within a multi-disciplinary team, addressing this complex and often stigmatized subject.

Physiopedia and its content crew have been working diligently within the past month to promote mental health awareness and offer practical resources to physiotherapists.

Physiopedia has helpful pages on specific mental health disorders such as alcoholismattention deficit disordersbipolar disorderchronic pain and post-traumatic stress disorder (to name a few).  There are also several pages outlining the challenges and considerations when addressing a specific population such as the elite athlete, an individual affected by  a generalized anxiety disorderamputees, or a homeless population, for example.

Physiopedia is dedicated to helping physiotherapists feeling more confident and competent with their roles as health care providers when confronted with mental health factors. As such, Physiopedia offers supportive resources for identifying red flags, how to self-identify clinical burnout symptoms, and offer guidelines for clinically friendly mental health outcome measures. There are also online courses offered to members addressing Clinical Reflective Frameworks and mindfulness.

Lastly, there are numerous clinically applicable pages highlighting the benefits of exercise and physical activity with respect to promoting a strong mental and physical life balance. Notwithstanding that we all recognize the importance of movement for health, I encourage you all to take a look at the following pages as a reminder of the specific benefits for sound mental health:

I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate the Physiopedia team for their efforts in bringing mental health to the forefront of our practice this month. This is an impressive collection of resources that will only continue to grow over time. If you would like to contribute to this specialized topic, consider becoming a Physiopedia volunteer. If there are important topics or issues you would like to see on Physiopedia, feel free to let me know and contact me.

~Calm mind, calm body~

 

via Mental Health is Important. What You Can Do as a Physiotherapist – Physiospot – Physiotherapy and Physical Therapy in the Spotlight

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[Abstract] Employment stability in the first 5 years after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury

Abstract

Objective

To characterize employment stability and identify predictive factors of employment stability in working-age individuals after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) that may be clinically addressed.

Design

Longitudinal observational study of an inception cohort from the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database (TBIMS-NDB) using data at years 1, 2, and 5 post-TBI.

Setting

Inpatient rehabilitation centers with telephone follow-up.

Participants

Individuals enrolled in the TBIMS-NDB since 2001, aged 18 to 59, with employment data at two or more follow-up interviews at years 1, 2, and 5 (N=5,683).

Interventions

Not applicable.

Main Outcome Measure

Employment stability, categorized using post-TBI employment data as no paid employment (53.25%), stably (27.20%), delayed (10.24%), or unstably (9.31%) employed.

Results

Multinomial regression analyses identified predictive factors of employment stability, including younger age, white race, less severe injuries, pre-injury employment, higher annual earnings, male sex, higher education, transportation independence post-injury, and no anxiety or depression at 1-year post-TBI.

Conclusions

Employment stability serves as an important measure of productivity post-TBI. Psychosocial, clinical, environmental, and demographic factors predict employment stability post-TBI. Notable predictors include transportation independence as well as presence of anxiety and depression at year 1 post-TBI as potentially modifiable intervention targets.

via Employment stability in the first 5 years after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury – Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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[Abstract] Depression in the First Year after Traumatic Brain Injury

Abstract

The aims of this study were to document the frequency of major and minor depressive episodes in the first year after traumatic brain injury (TBI), taking into account TBI severity and pre-morbid history of major depression, and to describe trajectories of depressive episodes. Participants were 227 adults who were hospitalized post-TBI (76% male; mean age = 41 years; 50% mild, 33% moderate, and 17% severe TBI). Major and minor depressive episodes were assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview at three time points (4, 8, and 12 months after TBI). Overall, 29% of participants had a major depressive episode in at least one of the three assessments, with fairly stable rates across assessments. Participants with mild TBI were more likely than those with moderate/severe TBI to be diagnosed with major depression, as were individuals with a positive pre-morbid history of depression compared to those without such history. In addition, 13% of participants had a minor depressive episode in at least one of the three assessments. Rates of minor depression significantly decreased from 4 to 8–12 months post-injury. Results also revealed a wide variety of trajectories of depressive episodes across assessments. Of note, 52% of major depression cases still fulfilled diagnostic criteria 4 months later, whereas 38% of minor depression cases deteriorated to major depression at the following assessment. These findings suggest that depression is highly prevalent after TBI, and monitoring of patients with subthreshold depressive symptoms is warranted in order to prevent the development of full-blown major depressive episodes.

 

via Depression in the First Year after Traumatic Brain Injury | Journal of Neurotrauma

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[TED Talks] 5 Must watch TED Talks About Depression

Hello, my name is Faith and I’ve been managing depression and anxiety for as long as I can remember. I started this blog to share my tips and tricks and help other bad ass babes kick ass on their mental health journey. I have an online support group you can join for free here. If you need help finding a mental health care provider call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or visit BetterHelp to talk to a certified therapist online at an affordable price.

This post contains affiliate links, you can read my full disclosure policy here.

I went down the rabbit hole of TED talks again and I thought I would share these awesome TED talks about depression. These aren’t all uplifting but sometimes you need to hear some realness. Positivety kind of feels like a big pile of garbage when you’re depressed anyways (if you’ve ever tried to watch a motivational talk when you’re depressed you probably know what I’m talking about). If you’re depressed and looking for resources checkout my articles on depression and download my free mental health planner.

David Burns talks about using cognitive therapy to treat his depressed patients. He helps his clients to change how they think in order to change how they feel.

Kevin Breel talks about breaking the stigma of depression. If you are feeling depressed and feel like you are along trust me you’re not. There are lots of us out here struggling with depression. I have a mental health support group on Facebookthat you can join if you are looking to connect with other people who are struggling with mental health.

Zindel Segal has been treating his depressed clients by teaching them to appreciate the present moment. Try out the techniques in his talk and see if you think they can help you.

I love her story about communicating with her 2 year old in a positive way. She started trying to practice unconditional positive regard with her kids and then started trying to practice giving unconditional positive regard on herself.

Here’s a kids TED talk from a girl that was hospitalized from depression and anxiety.

Thanks for checking out my post. If you’re looking for more motivation checkout my post of bad ass commencement speeches. I have a ton of mental health resources on my site that I hope you’ll checkout like my free mental health planner or my posts related to anxiety and depression.

 

via TED Talks About Depression – Radical Transformation Project

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[VIDEO] A/Prof Danny Eckert: Sleep Your Way to Good Mental Health – NeuRA Talks

What does sleep have to do with mental health? Everything!

To see more seminars like this, visit: neuratalks.org

The focus of Neuroscience Research Australia, or NeuRA, has always been on neuroscience. We conduct clinical and laboratory research into neurological, psychiatric and psychological disorders.

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL http://www.youtube.com/neuraustralia

More info at…

http://www.neura.edu.au

http://www.facebook.com/NeuroscienceR…

https://twitter.com/neuraustralia/

 

 

via NeuRA Talks – A/Prof Danny Eckert: Sleep Your Way to Good Mental Health – YouTube

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[WEB SITE] How VR Helps Seniors and People With Disabilities Improve Their Health and Happiness

 
Credit to: NPR

With seniors over the age of 65 making up 617 million people worldwide and 15% of all people (over a billion) being disabled, health and happiness is an important concept that affects everyone.

News flash — we’re all human, everyone ages, many people are already disabled or will become disabled at some point in their life, and most people want to feel happy and healthy in their lives.

Not Enough Exercise

Credit to: Dreamstime.com

Exercising for at least 30 minutes a day is linked to better physical and emotional health. With a third of adults aged 50 and up and 47% of people with disabilities ages 18 to 64 not getting enough exercise, there has to be something to get them moving and enjoying life to the fullest.

Seniors and people with disabilities are sometimes limited to what exercises they can do. Adaptive equipment like a wheelchair, walker, or cane are supposed to improve mobility but can become a hindrance to exercise for many. People with physical limitations may not even be able to stand, walk, or leave their bed due to medical reasons.

Credit to: CBS

So what’s the solution? How do we get seniors and people who are disabled more access to activity and increase their wellbeing? The answer is virtual reality. VR allows anyone to put on a headset, pick a game that’s standing or sitting, and enjoy the combined benefits of physical and mental activity.

VR Cardio

Getting cardio doesn’t have to mean going for a run or jog anymore, you can still get a workout and reap all the heart-healthy benefits from playing a VR game.

Credit to: Rec Room via Against Gravity

Rec Room is best played with a group of people because you’ll be playing games like paintball. The game won’t be too intense, you’re free to sit or stand while playing, and it will feel like the exercise equivalent to walking.

Credit to: Music Inside: A VR Rhythm Game via Reality Reflection

There’s also a faster paced drumming VR game called Music Inside: A VR Rhythm Game that can be played standing or sitting as you use your upper body to hit the drum to the beat and your core and lower body to stabilize.

There are many more VR games on the VR Fitness Insider game page that will get your heart pumping. Take a look!

VR Strength Training

Having strong muscles can help improve balance, strength, can reduce bone fractures, and can even improve independence during activities over time.

Fruit Ninja is a great standing game that has you using the VR controllers as a machete to slice and dice fruit. You’ll be using your upper body to reach and slice fruit, your mid-body to reach towards different directions, and your lower body to position your body and to move frequently. This VR game is rated by the VR Health Institute as being an equal workout compared to using an elliptical.

Please note: If you have a strong upper body or lower body and want a challenge you can always add hand weights or ankle weights to boost the difficulty level. Please consult a trainer or doctor before adding weights to your exercise plan.

VR Flexibility for Mind and Body

Exercising your body while also using your mind can help promote happiness, lower stress, improve memory, and flexible thinking skills.

Everyone experiences stress, so playing games like Wise Mind is a great way for everyone to unwind from a long day or start the day off with a clear and calm mind. Wise Mind has you practicing Tai Chi, balancing stones, and gives you mindfulness and meditation exercises to choose from. Tai Chi is great for a low impact and low-stress exercise that can be done seated or standing. Balancing stones is great for hand-eye coordination practice as well as promoting patience and understanding with yourself and others. While the meditation and mindfulness activities will keep your mind clear and resilient.

Stretching muscles helps to prevent muscle atrophy, improve range of motion and flexibility, reduces injuries, and increases pain relief.

VR apps like Yoga Joint VR Experience are great for getting a slow to advanced paced stretch while also building muscle strength and tone. Yoga involves you using your own strength to hold poses using your own body weight. Many yoga poses can be modified to suit needs based on injuries and physical limitations. Some yoga stretches can even be modified while sitting in a chair or wheelchair.

VR Helps Everyone Get Healthy

Credit to: Abilitynet.org.uk

Getting exercise, stretching, and being mindful using VR will improve your physical health but it will also make you feel happier overall. Getting VR headsets and games in the hands of the people who will benefit from using it the most is essential. Helping the disabled and the elderly gain access to VR helps them break through old limitations that used to hold them back.

Credit to: Pixabay.com

Using VR to exercise and experience new ideas, environments, and people drastically improves the quality of people’s lives. So let’s do something about it — tell your neighbors, friends, coworkers, and family members about the physical and mental health benefits of VR.

Source: How VR Helps Seniors and People With Disabilities Improve Their Health and Happiness – VR Fitness Insider

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[WEB SITE] Samsung Develops VR Systems For Mental Health Care

A project involving South Korean hospital, FNI and Samsung will create mental health diagnostic tools in VR.

Virtual reality (VR) has seen a rise in use by the healthcare industry. From teaching medical students about trauma procedures, to helping tackle the loneliness and isolation of long-term medical care, VR has seen a variety of uses in medicine. Now Samsung are aiming to develop VR system that can help in the field of mental health.

Mental health care is a complex field, with many of the mechanisms surrounding mental health conditions still poorly understood. Working with VR content creator FNI and the Gangnam Severence Hospital in South Korea, Samsung hopes to gain some insight into this area, and make advances in the field of mental health care.

Gear VR Controller

The project will be aimed at developing systems in the areas of cognitive behaviour therapy, suicide prevention and psychological assessment. A combination of the Samsung Gear VR headset, Gear S3 smartwatch, S Health app and AI virtual assistant Bixby will be used to develop diagnosis kits and other physical products and applications. Medical data from the hospital will be used to ‘teach’ the AI about the medical conditions it will encounter.

The three companies are hoping to be able to turn the products into a commercial product that can be rolled out to hospitals, dementia centres and schools at some point in 2018. There are also plans to make the products available to patients for home use at some point.

VRFocus will bring you further information on Samsung’s VR health applications as it becomes available.

Source: Samsung Develops VR Systems For Mental Health Care – VRFocus

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[WEB site] First trial of Cognition Kit wearables demonstrates effectiveness in measuring mental health

The neuroscience company Cambridge Cognition Holdings PLC, which develops near patient technologies for the assessment of brain health, has announced results from a new technology feasibility study. The results demonstrate for the first time that consumer grade wearables such as the Apple Watch® and Microsoft Band can be used to accurately measure clinically relevant cognitive performance in everyday life using the Company’s new Cognition Kit software.

Mental health conditions are among the leading causes of disability worldwide. With more than 450 million people living with mental illnesses, the cost of treatment and care to global economies will double by 2030 to over $6 trillion (Source: World Health Organization).

Current methods of brain health assessment rely on infrequent snapshots to characterise impairment and recovery. Such sparse sampling will often miss clinically significant changes, which can impact on a patient’s quality of life and limit the ability to accurately measure the effect of intervention and treatment.

Cognition Kit is a wearable software platform developed under a joint venture between Cambridge Cognition and London research agency Ctrl Group to address this growing need. The technology will enable doctors, scientists and patients to better understand and manage day-to-day brain health by measuring the key biological and psychological factors affecting mental performance accurately in real time.

The new study shows for the first time that wearable consumer devices can be used clinically to measure cognitive performance accurately when programmed with the Cognition Kit software.

During the study participants wore a wearable device to monitor their levels of stress and physiological activity using built-in sensors of heart rate, galvanic skin response and skin temperature.

Throughout each day, subjects completed game-like micro tests of cognition on the device to measure attention, memory, mood and reaction speed.

After each cognitive game, subjects reported how they felt by selecting one of six faces to convey their current mood. On June 24th, the day of the EU referendum results in the UK, the researchers observed a significant drop in the general mood of the British participants in the study.

The 30 million data points recorded demonstrate distinct patterns of performance within and across days, allowing a rich picture of a subject’s cognitive health to emerge. Cognition Kit thus has the potential to revolutionise brain health treatment at all stages – from patient assessments during the development of disease-modifying interventions to monitoring of patient health.

With drug development companies increasingly being required to demonstrate clinical outcomes-based value of treatments in patients, this Cognition Kit study provides evidence that new technologies could transform healthcare and medical research in a wearable health industry estimated to be worth $2 billion (Source: Soreon Research Wearable Healthcare Report 2014).

Cambridge Cognition is in discussion with a number of pharmaceutical partners following significant early interest boosted by the results of the study and expects to sign the first Cognition Kit contracts in the near future.

Francesca Cormack, PhD, Director of Research and Innovation, Cambridge Cognition commented

”This proof of concept study demonstrates for the first time that these consumer devices are enabling the rapid and accurate collection of largescale scientific datasets. This not only allows dramatically more detailed knowledge of moment-by-moment brain function but also opens up new possibilities to develop machine learning algorithms that will enable earlier detection and intervention in brain disorders.”

Ben Fehnert, Co-founder of Ctrl Group and Director of Cognition Kit commented

”Simple, regular interaction with peoples own phones and wearable devices is key to helping understand daily and longer term fluctuations in cognitive function. This study is the first demonstration of how Cognition Kit software can build a rich picture of brain health using peoples own devices during their daily lives.”

About Cognition Kit

Cognition Kit is a joint venture between Cambridge Cognition and Ctrl Group formed in 2016 to develop digital health tools on mobile and wearable devices. Cognition Kit software takes research out of the lab and into daily life, enabling doctors, scientists and the public to better understand and manage day-to-day brain health.

Source: First trial of Cognition Kit wearables demonstrates effectiveness in measuring mental health

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