Posts Tagged mood swings

[BLOG POST] Vagus Nerve Stimulation…Is it for YOU?

Epilepsy Talk

Having a Vagus Nerve Stimulator implanted can be a tough decision.  Is it right for you? Will it work? What are the side effects and consequences?

I did some research and got the low-down on what it is, how it works and some interesting statistics.  (If you are already acquainted with the VNS and are on the fence, you might want to just skip down to risks and benefits sections.)

How it works

Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) has been used to treat more than 30,000 epilepsy patients worldwide. It’s designed to prevent or interrupt seizures or electrical disturbances in the brain for people with hard to control seizures. Used in conjunction with anti-seizure medications, the VNS uses electrical pulses that are delivered to the vagus nerve in the neck and travel up into the brain.

The good news is that the vagus nerve has very few pain fibers, so it’s…

View original post 912 more words

Advertisements

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Could High-Powered Infrared Light Help Reverse TBI Damage?

Published on August 27, 2015

NILTaaA possible treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI) could be the use of a specific high-powered, near-infrared light (NIR), a new study suggests.

The study was published recently in the journal Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, according to a media release from the Neuro-Laser Foundation.

Study co-authors Theodore Henderson, MD, PhD from the Neuro-Laser Foundation and Dr Larry Morries and Paolo Cassano of Massachusetts General suggest that a specific high-powered, near infrared light (NIR) can possibly re-energize damaged brain cells after penetrating the skin and skull, per the release.

In their study, which occurred from 2011 to 2013, the research team administered 10 transcranial applications of high-power NIR over the course of 2 months to 10 study participants who were diagnosed with chronic mild-to-moderate TBI. Using a Class IV laser and pulsed light, each treatment took less than 60 minutes, the release explains.

Continue —> Could High-Powered Infrared Light Help Reverse TBI Damage? – Physical Therapy Products

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Emotional Problems After Traumatic Brain Injury

Brain injury and emotions

A brain injury can change the way people feel or express emotions. An individual with TBI can have several types of emotional problems.

Difficulty controlling emotions or “mood swings”

Some people may experience emotions very quickly and intensely but with very little lasting effect. For example, they may get angry easily but get over it quickly. Or they may seem to be “on an emotional roller coaster” in which they are happy one moment, sad the next and then angry. This is called emotional lability.

What causes this problem?

  • Mood swings and emotional lability are often caused by damage to the part of the brain that controls emotions and behavior.
  • Often there is no specific event that triggers a sudden emotional response. This may be confusing for family members who may think they accidently did something that upset the injured person.
  • In some cases the brain injury can cause sudden episodes of crying or laughing. These emotional expressions or outbursts may not have any relationship to the way the persons feels (in other words, they may cry without feeling sad or laugh without feeling happy). In some cases the emotional expression may not match the situation (such as laughing at a sad story). Usually the person cannot control these expressions of emotion.

What can be done about it?

  • Fortunately, this situation often improves in the first few months after injury, and people often return to a more normal emotional balance and expression.
  • If you are having problems controlling your emotions, it is important to talk to a physician or psychologist to find out the cause and get help with treatment.
  • Counseling for the family can be reassuring and allow them to cope better on a daily basis.
  • Several medications may help improve or stabilize mood. You should consult a physician familiar with the emotional problems caused by brain injury.

What family members and others can do:

  • Remain calm if an emotional outburst occurs, and avoid reacting emotionally yourself.
  • Take the person to a quiet area to help him or her calm down and regain control.
  • Acknowledge feelings and give the person a chance to talk about feelings.
  • Provide feedback gently and supportively after the person gains control.
  • Gently redirect attention to a different topic or activity.

more –> Emotional Problems After Traumatic Brain Injury.

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Emotional Problems After Traumatic Brain Injury

Difficulty controlling emotions or “mood swings”

Some people may experience emotions very quickly and intensely but with very little lasting effect. For example, they may get angry easily but get over it quickly. Or they may seem to be “on an emotional roller coaster” in which they are happy one moment, sad the next and then angry. This is called emotional lability.

What causes this problem?

Mood swings and emotional lability are often caused by damage to the part of the brain that controls emotions and behavior.

Often there is no specific event that triggers a sudden emotional response. This may be confusing for family members who may think they accidently did something that upset the injured person.

In some cases the brain injury can cause sudden episodes of crying or laughing. These emotional expressions or outbursts may not have any relationship to the way the persons feels (in other words, they may cry without feeling sad or laugh without feeling happy). In some cases the emotional expression may not match the situation (such as laughing at a sad story). Usually the person cannot control these expressions of emotion.

more –> Emotional Problems After Traumatic Brain Injury.

, , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: