Posts Tagged motion capture

[Abstract + References] Towards a framework for rehabilitation and assessment of upper limb motor function based on Serious Games – IEEE Conference Publication

Abstract

 Serious Games and Virtual Reality (VR) are being considered at present as an alternative to traditional rehabilitation therapies. In this paper, the ongoing development of a framework focused on rehabilitation and assessment of the upper limb motor function based on serious games as a source of entertainment for physiotherapy patients is described. A set of OpenSource Serious Games for rehabilitation has been developed, using the last version of Microsoft1® Kinect™ as low cost monitoring sensor and the software Unity. These Serious Games captures 3D human body data and it stored them in the patient database to facilitate a later clinical analysis to the therapist. Also, a VR-based system for the automated assessment of motor function based on Fugl-Meyer Assessment Test (FMA) is addressed. The proposed system attempts to be an useful therapeutic tool for tele-rehabilitation in order to reduce the number of patients, time spent and cost to
hospitals.

I. Introduction

Biomechanical analysis is an important feature during the evaluation and clinical diagnosis of motor deficits caused by traumas or neurological diseases. For that reason Motion capture (MoCap) systems are widely used in biomechanical studies, in order to collect position data from anatomical landmarks with high accuracy. Their results are used to estimate joint movements, positions, and muscle forces. These quantitative results improve the tracking of changes in motor functions over time, being more accurately than clinical ratings [1]. For clinical applications, these results are usually transformed into clinically meaningful and interpretable parameters, such as gait speed, motion range of joints and body balance.

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via Towards a framework for rehabilitation and assessment of upper limb motor function based on Serious Games – IEEE Conference Publication

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[Abstract] Kinect V2 as a tool for stroke recovery: Pilot study of motion scale monitoring

Abstract:

This paper investigates Kinect device application during rehabilitation of people with an ischemic stroke. There are many similar application using Kinect as a tool during rehabilitation. This paper is focused on measurement of Kinect’s spatial accuracy and proposition of body states and exercises according to the Motor assessment scale for stroke (MAS). The system observes the whole rehabilitation process and objectively compares ranges of movement during each exercise. Angles between limbs are computed in the skeletal body joints projection to three anatomical planes, which enables a better insight to subject performance. The system is easily implemented with a consumer-grade computer and a low-cost Kinect device. Selected exercises are presented together with the angles evolution, body states recognition and the MAS Scale after the stroke classification.

Source: Kinect V2 as a tool for stroke recovery: Pilot study of motion scale monitoring – IEEE Xplore Document

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[ARTICLE] HeartHealth: A Cardiovascular Disease Home-based Rehabilitation System – Full Text PDF

 

 

Abstract

The increasing pressure on medical institutions around the world requires health care professionals to be prescribing home- based exercise rehabilitation treatments to empower patients to self-monitor their rehabilitation journey. Home-based exercise rehabilitation has shown to be highly effective in treating conditions such as Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). However, adherence to home-based exercise rehabilitation remains low. Possible causes for this are that patients are not monitored, they cannot be con- fident that they are performing the exercise correctly or accurately and they receive no feedback.

This paper proposes HeartHealth, a novel patient-centric gamified exercise rehabilitation platform that can help address the issue of adherence to these programmes. The key functionality is the ability to record the patient movements and compare them against the exercises that have been prescribed in order to return feedback to the patient and to the health care professional, as well.

In order to synthesize a compact fully operational system able to work in real life scenarios, tools and services from FI-PPP projects, FIWARE 1 and FI-STAR 2, were exploited and a new FI-STAR component, Motion Evaluation Specific Enabler (SE), was designed and developed. The HeartHealth system brings together real-time cloud-based motion evaluation coupled with accurate low-cost motion capture, a personalised exercise rehabilitation programme and an intuitive and fun serious game interface, designed specifically with a Cardiac Rehabilitation population in mind.

Full Text PDF

Source: HeartHealth: A Cardiovascular Disease Home-based Rehabilitation System

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[ARTICLE] Development and preliminary evaluation of a novel low cost VR-based upper limb stroke rehabilitation platform using Wii technology.

Abstract

Purpose: This paper proposes a novel system (using the Nintendo Wii remote) that offers customised, non-immersive, virtual reality-based, upper-limb stroke rehabilitation and reports on promising preliminary findings with stroke survivors.

Method: The system novelty lies in the high accuracy of the full kinematic tracking of the upper limb movement in real-time, offering strong personal connection between the stroke survivor and a virtual character when executing therapist prescribed adjustable exercises/games. It allows the therapist to monitor patient performance and to individually calibrate the system in terms of range of movement, speed and duration.

Results: The system was tested for acceptability with three stroke survivors with differing levels of disability. Participants reported an overwhelming connection with the system and avatar. A two-week, single case study with a long-term stroke survivor showed positive changes in all four outcome measures employed, with the participant reporting better wrist control and greater functional use. Activities, which were deemed too challenging or too easy were associated with lower scores of enjoyment/motivation, highlighting the need for activities to be individually calibrated.

Conclusions: Given the preliminary findings, it would be beneficial to extend the case study in terms of duration and participants and to conduct an acceptability and feasibility study with community dwelling survivors.

Implications for Rehabilitation

  • Low-cost, off-the-shelf game sensors, such as the Nintendo Wii remote, are acceptable by stroke survivors as an add-on to upper limb stroke rehabilitation but have to be bespoked to provide high-fidelity and real-time kinematic tracking of the arm movement.
  • Providing therapists with real-time and remote monitoring of the quality of the movement and not just the amount of practice, is imperative and most critical for getting a better understanding of each patient and administering the right amount and type of exercise.
  • The ability to translate therapeutic arm movement into individually calibrated exercises and games, allows accommodation of the wide range of movement difficulties seen after stroke and the ability to adjust these activities (in terms of speed, range of movement and duration) will aid motivation and adherence – key issues in rehabilitation.
  • With increasing pressures on resources and the move to more community-based rehabilitation, the proposed system has the potential for promoting the intensity of practice necessary for recovery in both community and acute settings.

via Development and preliminary evaluation of a novel low cost VR-based upper limb stroke rehabilitation platform using Wii technology, Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, Informa Healthcare.

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[ARTICLE] Development and preliminary evaluation of a novel low cost VR-based upper limb stroke rehabilitation platform using Wii technology

Purpose: This paper proposes a novel system (using the Nintendo Wii remote) that offers customised, non-immersive, virtual reality-based, upper-limb stroke rehabilitation and reports on promising preliminary findings with stroke survivors.

Method: The system novelty lies in the high accuracy of the full kinematic tracking of the upper limb movement in real-time, offering strong personal connection between the stroke survivor and a virtual character when executing therapist prescribed adjustable exercises/games. It allows the therapist to monitor patient performance and to individually calibrate the system in terms of range of movement, speed and duration.

Results: The system was tested for acceptability with three stroke survivors with differing levels of disability. Participants reported an overwhelming connection with the system and avatar. A two-week, single case study with a long-term stroke survivor showed positive changes in all four outcome measures employed, with the participant reporting better wrist control and greater functional use. Activities, which were deemed too challenging or too easy were associated with lower scores of enjoyment/motivation, highlighting the need for activities to be individually calibrated.

Conclusions: Given the preliminary findings, it would be beneficial to extend the case study in terms of duration and participants and to conduct an acceptability and feasibility study with community dwelling survivors.

Implications for Rehabilitation

  1. Low-cost, off-the-shelf game sensors, such as the Nintendo Wii remote, are acceptable by stroke survivors as an add-on to upper limb stroke rehabilitation but have to be bespoked to provide high-fidelity and real-time kinematic tracking of the arm movement.
  2. Providing therapists with real-time and remote monitoring of the quality of the movement and not just the amount of practice, is imperative and most critical for getting a better understanding of each patient and administering the right amount and type of exercise.
  3. The ability to translate therapeutic arm movement into individually calibrated exercises and games, allows accommodation of the wide range of movement difficulties seen after stroke and the ability to adjust these activities (in terms of speed, range of movement and duration) will aid motivation and adherence – key issues in rehabilitation.
  4. With increasing pressures on resources and the move to more community-based rehabilitation, the proposed system has the potential for promoting the intensity of practice necessary for recovery in both community and acute settings.

via Development and preliminary evaluation of a novel low cost VR-based upper limb stroke rehabilitation platform using Wii technology, Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, Informa Healthcare.

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[ARTICLE] VR-Assisted Physical Rehabilitation: Adapting to the Needs of Therapists and Patients – Full Text

…Virtual Reality technologies are slated to transform the practice of physical rehabilitation and the potential benefits have only started to be explored. We present in this paper a direct motion demonstration approach for allowing therapists to intuitively create and edit customized exercises and therapy programs that are responsive to the needs of their patients. We propose adaptive exercise models, motion processing algorithms, and delivery techniques designed to achieve exercises that effectively respond to physical limitations and recovery rates of individual patients.

Remote networked solutions are also presented for allowing therapists and patients to intuitively share their motions during real-time collaborative therapy sessions. Our solutions have been implemented as a low-cost portable system based on a Kinect sensor, and as a highend virtual reality system providing full-scale immersion. We analyze and discuss our methods and systems in light of feedback received from therapists…

Download Article – PDF

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