Posts Tagged Motivation

[Abstract] Potential benefits of music playing in stroke upper limb motor rehabilitation

Highlights

• Music-based interventions integrate most of the principles of motor training and multimodal stimulation.

• The use of music in rehabilitation can improve motor and cognitive functions of subacute and chronic stroke patients.

• Music-based interventions lead to better mood and quality of life in stroke patients than conventional approaches.

• Future studies should better address methodological aspects to improve the level of evidence of these interventions.

Abstract

Music-based interventions have emerged as a promising tool in stroke motor rehabilitation as they integrate most of the principles of motor training and multimodal stimulation.

This paper aims to review the use of music in the rehabilitation of upper extremity motor function after stroke. First, we review the evidence supporting current music-based interventions including Music-supported Therapy, Music glove, group music therapy, Rhythm- and music-based intervention, and Musical sonification. Next, we describe the mechanisms that may be responsible for the effectiveness of these interventions, focusing on motor learning aspects, how multimodal stimulation may boost motor performance, and emotional and motivational aspects related to music.

Then, we discuss methodological concerns in music therapy research related to modifications of therapy protocols, evaluation of patients and study designs. Finally, we highlight clinical considerations for the implementation of music-based interventions in clinical settings

Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0149763419310024

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[ARTICLE] Acceptability of a Mobile Phone–Based Augmented Reality Game for Rehabilitation of Patients With Upper Limb Deficits from Stroke: Case Study – Full Text

ABSTRACT

Background: Upper limb functional deficits are common after stroke and result from motor weakness, ataxia, spasticity, spatial neglect, and poor stamina. Past studies employing a range of commercial gaming systems to deliver rehabilitation to stroke patients provided short-term efficacy but have not yet demonstrated whether or not those games are acceptable, that is, motivational, comfortable, and engaging, which are all necessary for potential adoption and use by patients.

Objective: The goal of the study was to assess the acceptability of a smartphone-based augmented reality game as a means of delivering stroke rehabilitation for patients with upper limb motor function loss.

Methods: Patients aged 50 to 70 years, all of whom experienced motor deficits after acute ischemic stroke, participated in 3 optional therapy sessions using augmented reality therapeutic gaming over the course of 1 week, targeting deficits in upper extremity strength and range of motion. After completion of the game, we administered a 16-item questionnaire to the patients to assess the game’s acceptability; 8 questions were answered by rating on a scale from 1 (very negative experience) to 5 (very positive experience); 8 questions were qualitative.

Results: Patients (n=5) completed a total of 23 out of 45 scheduled augmented reality game sessions, with patient fatigue as the primary factor for uncompleted sessions. Each patient consented to 9 potential game sessions and completed a mean of 4.6 (SE 1.3) games. Of the 5 patients, 4 (80%) completed the questionnaire at the end of their final gaming session. Of note, patients were motivated to continue to the end of a given gaming session (mean 4.25, 95% CI 3.31-5.19), to try other game-based therapies (mean 3.75, 95% CI 2.81-4.69), to do another session (mean 3.50, 95% CI 2.93-4.07), and to perform other daily rehabilitation exercises (mean 3.25, 95% CI 2.76-3.74). In addition, participants gave mean scores of 4.00 (95% CI 2.87-5.13) for overall experience; 4.25 (95% CI 3.31-5.19) for comfort; 3.25 (95% CI 2.31-4.19) for finding the study fun, enjoyable, and engaging; and 3.50 (95% CI 2.52-4.48) for believing the technology could help them reach their rehabilitation goals. For each of the 4 patients, their reported scores were statistically significantly higher than those generated by a random sampling of values (patient 1: P=.04; patient 2: P=.04; patient 4: P=.004; patient 5: P=.04).

Conclusions: Based on the questionnaire scores, the patients with upper limb motor deficits following stroke who participated in our case study found our augmented reality game motivating, comfortable, engaging, and tolerable. Improvements in augmented reality technology motivated by this case study may one day allow patients to work with improved versions of this therapy independently in their own home. We therefore anticipate that smartphone-based augmented reality gaming systems may eventually provide useful postdischarge self-treatment as a supplement to professional therapy for patients with upper limb deficiencies from stroke.

Introduction

Background

Stroke induces a variety of functional impairments, as well as pain and other ailments, depending on its type and location [1]. Common deficits associated with ischemic stroke include motor function, spatial neglect, and psychological changes [1]. Motor function deficits after stroke often include partial or total loss of function of the upper or lower limbs on a given side, with associated muscle weakness, poor stamina, lack of muscle control, and even paralysis [2]. These deficits impact the patient’s independent lifestyle and decrease their performance of activities of daily living [1]. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the most important part of rehabilitation programs is “carefully directed, well-focused, repetitive practice [3].”

Prior Work

Patients who engage in rigorous, time-intensive, and challenging therapeutic exercises after ischemic stroke tend to experience greater functional recovery, while if ignored or insufficiently treated, impairments may remain [4,5]. The dosage of motor skill practice correlates to the extent of motor recovery following a stroke [4]. In addition, the type of therapy delivered relative to patient’s impairment determines outcomes after therapy. For example, for those who have upper limb motor impairment, best therapeutic practice modifies the prescribed exercises as the patient’s symptoms evolve [5,6]. Regrettably, patients report their experiences of conventional repetitive stroke rehabilitation therapies as tedious and difficult to hold their interest, which conflicts with the fact that patient motivation is often required to obtain good clinical outcomes [710].

Rehabilitation doctors and medical staff, therefore, face a significant problem: how can they provide high intensity therapy in large quantities for upper limb impairments with this seemingly intrinsic motivational deficit? Especially problematic are patient’s therapeutic needs after their discharge from the hospital—their therapeutic needs still exist, but medical staff have substantially reduced access to the patient to provide targeted care. Given the difficulty of this problem, an insufficient percentage of patients regain the full functional potential of their upper limb after ischemic stroke [11]. This regrettable outcome motivates an ongoing search for new therapeutic approaches that provide acceptable (motivational, comfortable, and engaging) experiences, hence, effective therapy, especially at the patient’s home. 

Use of commercial augmented reality devices has found recent application in stroke rehabilitation using existing expensive commercial headsets [4,617]. However, there are few studies that assay the acceptability of augmented reality gaming system–based patient rehabilitation after stroke [10,12,1719], and then, only in a cursory fashion. For example, 30 patients recovering from stroke were surveyed for their opinions on game-based rehabilitation, and the researchers concluded that though games for patients recovering from stroke existed, they were primarily designed for efficacy, not entertainment [10]; they suggest investing in a single, affordable gaming platform for patient rehabilitation after stroke that also focuses on entertainment and provides diverse gaming content [10]. Augmented reality technology and an upper-limb assistive device were tested on 3 individuals recovering from stroke for 6 weeks, and the study reported that both the user and therapist believed that their augmented reality environment was user friendly due to the lightness of the assistive devices and the simplicity of set-up [18]. Finally, a study of 4 patients recovering from stroke who were exposed to several gaming platforms reported that manually adjusting the difficulty of games to provide a challenge and creating games with deeper story lines helped the patients stay motivated to perform their gaming exercises [17]. To the best of our knowledge, our case study is the first of its kind that analyzes the opinions of patients recovering from stroke regarding the problems of current augmented reality–specific game-based rehabilitation systems to provides insight into future designs of augmented reality game-based stroke rehabilitation systems. Augmented reality, provided by one of a variety of device designs, represents one such approach. Augmented reality projects a live camera view of a user’s environment and computer-generated objects with a variety of properties—movement and sound, typically. As an example, Pokémon Go, a smartphone-based augmented reality game, has had documented success sustaining the interest of users for extended periods of time while consistently increasing their physical activity [13], making augmented reality a prime candidate for facilitating otherwise tedious therapy.

Hypothesis

Since patient motivation often drives a larger dosage of rehabilitation therapy, hence, improved clinical outcomes [20,21], we hypothesized that augmented reality deployed on a relatively inexpensive and readily available platform—a smartphone—could provide a motivational, comfortable, and engaging rehabilitation experience. To test this hypothesis, we first developed a candidate rehabilitation game on a smartphone that could encourage a patient’s hand motions through use of simple visual cues with a custom-made app. We then asked patients with acute upper-motor stroke to use this system and report their experiences via a questionnaire that assayed the acceptability of the game in terms of motivation to continue to play, comfort, and engagement.

Methods

Overview

This acceptability study was conducted at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington from November 2018 to March 2019. Inpatients who were recovering from an acute ischemic stroke participated and provided consent. These patients had impaired strength as determined by physical and occupational therapists. To be included in the study, they had to have at least antigravity strength in deltoid or biceps muscles as well as the ability to perform internal and external shoulder rotations. All patients in this study had a Medical Research Council manual muscle score of 3 or 4 in the affected limb.

Intervention

We designed and built an augmented reality game using Unity (Unity Technologies) that is deployable on any modern smartphone with a camera (Table 1 and Figure 1). The game presents users with a view of an augmented reality dolphin swimming under the ocean with the task of capturing fish and feeding turtles, worn on the hand associated with the upper-limb deficit (Multimedia Appendix 1). To experience the game, patients wore an augmented reality headset, which did not obscure the camera mounted on the phone, and a custom device on their hand. We used two headsets—the Google Daydream headset, which required us to remove the front panel that held the phone in place, and the Merge augmented reality/virtual reality headset, which did not require any modification (Figure 1). The game also required users to place the hand associated with their motor deficits within a padded box that replaced their hand as seen in augmented reality with a dolphin (Figure 1). Finally, we required the user to look at a complex landscape through their headset while wearing the padded box and while playing the game. Instead of holding the phone, the headset supported the phone for the user. We built customized controllers with different interior sizes that changed the effective grip strength of the controller; this was important because our patients’ ability to hold the controllers varied. Viewing the complex landscape through the augmented reality system caused our software to create a seascape that contained a turtle, fish, and other underwater flora and fauna (Multimedia Appendix 1). Successful placement of the dolphin over a fish allowed the dolphin to capture the fish. Placement of the dolphin plus fish over the turtle allowed the user to feed the turtle, thereby winning points.

Notably, we used the TeamViewer (TeamViewer AG) app to project the screen view of the patient from the phone to a laptop, so we could see the patient’s view with, however, the complex landscape was also projected in the background, so we could check the viewer’s alignment with the landscape while they played (Figure 1).

Set-up of the game, to ensure that system function was verified, occurred prior to patients using the system. Patients followed verbal directions and instructions from study staff on how to use the system, facilitated by demonstration of the game using the TeamViewer app. Examples of directions included how to start the game, the actions required to pick up the fish, and how to colocate the dolphin plus fish with the turtle for point accumulation. Some patients required physical assistance to adjust the view of the environment. Examples of physical assistance included moving the patient’s chair or wheelchair closer or farther away from the images recognized by the camera (Figure 1).

Table 1. Vuforia compatible mobile devices.
Figure 1. (A) phone: Asus Zenfone 2, phone operating system: Android 7 Nougat, Unity version: 2018.2.10, developer operating system: Windows 10; (B) headsets: Google Daydream (left) Merge augmented reality/virtual reality goggles (right); (C) controllers with various grip sizes consisting of soft foam inserts; (D) virtual dolphin avatar; (E) image target; (F) study staff during game play with (1) smartphone (2) headset (3) controller (4) image target; (G) user experience.

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Source: https://rehab.jmir.org/2020/2/e17822/

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[WEB SITE] How Music Helps Your Mental Health

How Music Helps Your Mental Health

Music is medicine for your mind.

There are very few things that stimulate the brain in the way it does. It’s one of the most demanding cognitive and neural challenging activities. Music requires complex and accurate timing of multiple actions in your brain because of the structural, mathematical, and architectural relationships between the notes. Although it may not feel like it, your brain is doing a lot of computing to make sense of all the incoming stimuli. It’s one of the few activities that activate almost every part of your brain.

The effects of music are cognitive, psychological, social, behavioral, and emotional. Research has shown that listening to musical pieces can reduce anxiety, blood pressure, and pain as well as improve sleep quality, mood, mental alertness, and memory. Active engagement with music has lasting brain benefits, such as improving concentration, memory, self-discipline, and confidence.  The cognitive benefits of music education extend from early childhood to old age. Some studies show that it can make you smarter. It may even help ward off the effects of brain aging.Music is a total brain workout.

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Music Evokes Mental States

Listening to, singing, playing, composing, and improvising music evokes and allows you to express mental states and feelings. New research has determined that the subjective experience of music across cultures can be mapped to at least 13 common feelings, including:

  • amusement,
  • joy,
  • eroticism,
  • beauty,
  • relaxation,
  • sadness,
  • dreaminess,
  • triumph,
  • anxiety,
  • scariness,
  • annoyance,
  • defiance, and
  • feeling pumped up.

Researchers came up with a very cool interactive map, in which musical samples are plotted along the 13 dimensions of the emotional experiences determined. In the map, each letter corresponds to a musical track. You can hover over a letter to play it. Check out the map here.

How Music Helps Your Mental Health
Graphic by Alan Cohen.

Potential applications for these research findings range from informing psychological and psychiatric therapies designed to evoke certain feelings to helping music streaming services like Spotify adjust their algorithms to satisfy customers’ audio preferences or set the mood.

Music’s Mental Health Benefits

Reduces Stress

Research shows that listening to certain melodies can lower the stress hormone, cortisol. In one study reviewed, patients about to undergo surgery who listened to music had less anxiety and lower cortisol levels than people who had taken drugs.

Listening to music triggers the brain’s nucleus accumbens, responsible for releasing the feel-good neurochemical dopamine, which is an integral part of the pleasure-reward and motivational systems and plays a critical role in learning. Higher dopamine levels improve concentration, boost mood, and enhance memory. Dopamine is the chemical responsible for the yummy feelings you get from eating chocolate, having an orgasm, or a runner’s high.

Decreases Depression

Science shows that music can help alleviate depression and help a person feel more hopeful and in control of their life. There is even evidence that listening to music can aid in rewiring trauma in the brain. Creating harmonies with others or enjoying live music, like at a concert, gets the brain hormone oxytocin flowing increasing feelings of connectedness, trust, and social bonding.

A study appearing in the World Journal of Psychiatry found that musical therapy successfully reduced depression and anxiety in patients suffering from neurological conditions such as dementia, stroke, and Parkinson’s disease. Researchers also noted that the therapy had no negative side effects and was a safe, low-risk treatment tool. Other research showed that musical therapy significantly improved depressive symptoms.

How Music Helps Your Mental Health

Boosts Mood

One study found that people who listened to upbeat tunes could improve their mood and boost happiness levels in just two weeks. In the experiment, one group was instructed to try to improve their mood with music. The other participants were told to listen to music but were not guided to try to intentionally elevate their mood. When participants were later asked to describe their happiness levels, those who had purposefully tried to improve their moods reported feeling happier after just two weeks.

Not surprisingly, another study found that different types of music had different effects on mood. Researchers determined that classical and meditation scores offered the greatest mood-boosting benefits. Heavy metal and techno were found to be ineffective and in some cases, detrimental. Surprisingly though, even sad music can bring most listeners pleasure and comfort, according to one study.

While listening to music can bring multiple mental and physical health benefits, creating it can be therapy, too. Singing in a choir has many mood-boosting and mental health benefits. Of course, playing a musical instrument has advantages for both your mental wellbeing and physical brain health.

Increases Motivation and Enhances Performance

There’s a good reason why exercise classes blast the beats or runners have tunes playing in their earbuds. Research shows that listening to fast-paced music motivates people to work out harder.

In one experiment, 12 healthy male students pedaled stationary bikes. The participants rode for 25 minutes in three sessions and listened to six songs. Unbeknownst to the bikers, the researchers were altering the tempos and measuring performances. For example, the songs were played at a normal speed, increased by ten percent, or slowed by ten percent.

The researchers discovered that speeding up the tracks resulted in increased performance in terms of distance covered, the speed of pedaling, and power exerted. Interestingly, listening to faster-paced songs not only caused exercisers to work harder during their workouts; they also reported enjoying the music more. Conversely, slowing down the tempo led to decreases in all of the variables.

Strengthens Social Bonds

In a 2013 review of the research on music, Stefan Koelsch, a music psychologist at the Freie University Berlin, determined the mechanisms through which music allows us to connect with one another. It impacts brain circuits involved in empathy, trust, and cooperation. This might explain how it has survived in every culture of the world. Music is one of the few activities where people around the globe respond in a common way. It connects all kinds of people across a myriad of cultures, traditions, and practices all over the world.

The article, Four Ways Music Strengthens Social Bonds, explains that music helps people feel connected in four ways:

  1. It increases contact, coordination, and cooperation with others.
  2. Music causes your brain to release oxytocin.
  3. It strengthens our “theory of mind” and empathy.
  4. Music increases cultural cohesion.

Source: https://www.thebestbrainpossible.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/logo.png?ezimgfmt=rs:1039×177/rscb1/ng:webp/ngcb1

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[Abstract] Autonomous Use of the Home Virtual Rehabilitation System: A Feasibility and Pilot Study

Objective: This article describes the findings of a study examining the ability of persons with strokes to use home virtual rehabilitation system (HoVRS), a home-based rehabilitation system, and the impact of motivational enhancement techniques on subjects’ motivation, adherence, and motor function improvements subsequent to a 3-month training program.

Materials and Methods: HoVRS integrates a Leap Motion controller, a passive arm support, and a suite of custom-designed hand rehabilitation simulations. For this study, we developed a library of three simulations, which include activities such as flexing and extending fingers to move a car, flying a plane with wrist movement, and controlling an avatar running in a maze using reaching movements. Two groups of subjects, the enhanced motivation (EM) group and the unenhanced control (UC) group, used the system for 12 weeks in their homes. The EM group trained using three simulations that provided 8–12 levels of difficulty and complexity. Graphics and scoring opportunities increased at each new level. The UC group performed the same simulations, but difficulty was increased utilizing an algorithm that increased difficulty incrementally, making adjustments imperceptible.

Results: Adherence to both the EM and UC protocols exceeded adherence to home exercise programs described in the stroke rehabilitation literature. Both groups demonstrated improvements in upper extremity function. Intrinsic motivation levels were better for the EM group and motivation levels were maintained for the 12-week protocol.

Conclusion: A 12-week home-based training program using HoVRS was feasible. Motivational enhancement may have a positive impact on motivation, adherence, and motor outcome.

 

via Autonomous Use of the Home Virtual Rehabilitation System: A Feasibility and Pilot Study | Games for Health Journal

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[ARTICLE] Factors That Contribute to the Use of Stroke Self-Rehabilitation Technologies: A Review – Full Text

ABSTRACT

Background: Stroke is increasingly one of the main causes of impairment and disability. Contextual and empirical evidence demonstrate that, mainly due to service delivery constraints, but also due to a move toward personalized health care in the comfort of patients’ homes, more stroke survivors undergo rehabilitation at home with minimal or no supervision. Due to this trend toward telerehabilitation, systems for stroke patient self-rehabilitation have become increasingly popular, with many solutions recently proposed based on technological advances in sensing, machine learning, and visualization. However, by targeting generic patient profiles, these systems often do not provide adequate rehabilitation service, as they are not tailored to specific patients’ needs.

Objective: Our objective was to review state-of-the-art home rehabilitation systems and discuss their effectiveness from a patient-centric perspective. We aimed to analyze engagement enhancement of self-rehabilitation systems, as well as motivation, to identify the challenges in technology uptake.

Methods: We performed a systematic literature search with 307,550 results. Then, through a narrative review, we selected 96 sources of existing home rehabilitation systems and we conducted a critical analysis. Based on the critical analysis, we formulated new criteria to be used when designing future solutions, addressing the need for increased patient involvement and individualism. We categorized the criteria based on (1) motivation, (2) acceptance, and (3) technological aspects affecting the incorporation of the technology in practice. We categorized all reviewed systems based on whether they successfully met each of the proposed criteria.

Results: The criteria we identified were nonintrusive, nonwearable, motivation and engagement enhancing, individualized, supporting daily activities, cost-effective, simple, and transferable. We also examined the motivation method, suitability for elderly patients, and intended use as supplementary criteria. Through the detailed literature review and comparative analysis, we found no system reported in the literature that addressed all the set criteria. Most systems successfully addressed a subset of the criteria, but none successfully addressed all set goals of the ideal self-rehabilitation system for home use.

Conclusions: We identified a gap in the state-of-the-art in telerehabilitation and propose a set of criteria for a novel patient-centric system to enhance patient engagement and motivation and deliver better self-rehabilitation commitment.

Introduction

Background

Stroke has become a global problem [1]. One new case is reported every 2 seconds, and the number of stroke patients is predicted to increase by 59% over the next 20 years [2]. In the United Kingdom alone, more than 100,000 stroke cases are reported annually [1], with impairment or disability affecting two-thirds of the 1.2 million stroke survivors [1]. In the United Kingdom, only 77% of stroke survivors are taken directly to the stroke unit. Due to the high number of patients, in England, for example, the social care costs are almost £1.7 billion per annum. The social care cost varies with the age of the patient: the older the patient, the higher the cost. The cost for a person who has had a stroke was reported in 2017 to be around £22,000 per annum. Thus, cost is one of the main drives for service delivery practices. In that respect, early discharge units have been used due to better outcomes and greater success on rehabilitation. Early discharge units consist of specialized personnel who offer an intensive rehabilitation program to the patient. However, after this intensive program of relatively short duration, the patient is discharged and continues the rehabilitation at home. This is expected to reduce costs by £1600 over 5 years for every patient, according to a 2017 report [1].

Due to increasing pressure to discharge patients early from hospital [3], they rely increasingly on home rehabilitation to improve their condition after discharge. As a result, the need has been increasing for home rehabilitation systems that are not dependent on specialist or clinician operators [1,4,5] while providing service similar to a clinical environment. Technological advances in home rehabilitation have been mainly focused on motor control impairments due to their prevalence in the patient population (85% worldwide [1]).

Rehabilitation in a home environment can prove more efficient than that in a clinical environment, as the home environment supports patient empowerment through self-efficacy [6,7]. The presence of supportive family members and a familiarity with the space are significant contributors to motivation. Additionally, rehabilitation in cooperation or in competition with family members demonstrates higher level of engagement [8].

Though rehabilitation in the comfort of a patient’s home seems an attractive option, home environments have limitations that can affect the use of clinical devices. The most prevalent limitations are related to space and the lack of qualified personnel to operate devices. The number of occupants; the patient’s mobility, individual personality, and mood disorders following stroke; and sound insulation, home modification requirements, and cost [9,10] also contribute to limitations of home rehabilitation. Finally, different age groups react differently to technology and devices; for example, elderly survivors often do not engage with wearable devices or video games [11]. As a result, stroke rehabilitation requires a person-centric approach that is suitable for the home environment and that does not require infrastructure change in the home.

Enhancing Motivation

The success of stroke rehabilitation depends heavily on personal commitment and effort. Recent studies, for example, on applied psychology in behavior change theories for stroke rehabilitation [1214], do support that the self-esteem of the patient is limited after stroke. In addition, there is an extended sedentary period due to disability and, thus, different programs of activities are set to motivate the patients. Thus, the patient’s motivation and engagement have a critical impact on the success of any routine that is to be encouraged [15]. This is especially critical for devices used at home, since patients are usually interacting with them alone without frequent checks. Indeed, if a device does not provide a high level of engagement or motivation enhancement, it is more likely to be abandoned within 90 days [16]. Motivation levels depend on the individual, their achievements, and their needs at each given point in time. For example, once the patients achieve their physiotherapy exercise targets, they lose motivation for further practice. There are 3 main approaches to enhancing patients’ motivation: (1) goal-setting theory, (2) self-efficacy improvement theory, and (3) possible selves theory.

Goal-Setting Theory

This approach has been proved effective for stroke survivors. According to the goal-setting theory, the patient’s motivation can be increased through setting small goals or targets. These need to be realistic, manageable, and well defined for the individual patient. However, they also need to be sufficiently challenging for the patient to be engaged [15,1719]. Figure 1 presents the main components contributing to motivation enhancement based on the goal-setting theory.

Figure 1. The main components of goal-setting theory.

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Continue —>  JBME – Factors That Contribute to the Use of Stroke Self-Rehabilitation Technologies: A Review | Vourganas | JMIR Biomedical Engineering

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[ARTICLE] What is the impact of user affect on motor learning in virtual environments after stroke? A scoping review – Full Text

Abstract

Purpose

The purported affective impact of virtual reality (VR) and active video gaming (AVG) systems is a key marketing strategy underlying their use in stroke rehabilitation, yet little is known as to how affective constructs are measured or linked to intervention outcomes. The purpose of this scoping review is to 1) explore how motivation, enjoyment, engagement, immersion and presence are measured or described in VR/AVG interventions for patients with stroke; 2) identify directional relationships between these constructs; and 3) evaluate their impact on motor learning outcomes.

Methods

A literature search was undertaken of VR/AVG interventional studies for adults post-stroke published in Medline, PEDro and CINAHL databases between 2007 and 2017. Following screening, reviewers used an iterative charting framework to extract data about construct measurement and description. A numerical and thematic analytical approach adhered to established scoping review guidelines.

Results

One hundred fifty-five studies were included in the review. Although the majority (89%; N = 138) of studies described at least one of the five constructs within their text, construct measurement took place in only 32% (N = 50) of studies. The most frequently described construct was motivation (79%, N = 123) while the most frequently measured construct was enjoyment (27%, N = 42). A summative content analysis of the 50 studies in which a construct was measured revealed that constructs were described either as a rationale for the use of VR/AVGs in rehabilitation (76%, N = 38) or as an explanation for intervention results (56%, N = 29). 38 (76%) of the studies proposed relational links between two or more constructs and/or between any construct and motor learning. No study used statistical analyses to examine these links.

Conclusions

Results indicate a clear discrepancy between the theoretical importance of affective constructs within VR/AVG interventions and actual construct measurement. Standardized terminology and outcome measures are required to better understand how enjoyment, engagement, motivation, immersion and presence contribute individually or in interaction to VR/AVG intervention effectiveness.

Introduction

An increasing evidence base supports the use of virtual reality (VR) and active video gaming (AVG) systems to promote motor learning in stroke rehabilitation [1234]. However, practical and logistical barriers to VR/AVG implementation in clinical sites have been well described [567]. To support their use, researchers and developers often emphasize the potential advantages of VR/AVG systems over conventional interventions, including that these technologies may enhance a patient’s affective experience in therapy for the purpose of facilitating recovery [891011]. Examining the role of affective factors for motor learning is an emerging area of emphasis in rehabilitation [212131415].

VR/AVG use may enhance patients’ motivation to participate in rehabilitation as well as their engagement in therapeutic tasks. Motivation encourages action toward a goal by eliciting and/or sustaining goal-directed behavior [16]. Motivation can be intrinsic (derived from personal curiosity, importance or relevance of the goal) or extrinsic (elicited via external reward) [17]. Engagement is a cognitive and affective quality or experience of a user during an activity [16]. Many characteristics of VR/AVG play can contribute to user motivation and engagement, such as novelty, salient audiovisual graphics, interactivity, feedback, socialization, optimal challenge [14], extrinsic rewards, intrinsic curiosity or desire to improve in the game, goal-oriented tasks, and meaningful play [18].

Motivation and engagement are hypothesized to support motor learning either indirectly, through increased practice dosage leading to increased repetitive practice, or directly, via enhanced dopaminergic mechanisms influencing motor learning processes [1516]. Yet evidence is required to support these claims. A logical first step is to understand how these constructs are being measured within VR/AVG intervention studies. Several studies have used practice dosage or intensity as an indicator of motivation or engagement [192021]. To the authors’ knowledge, few have specifically evaluated the indirect mechanistic pathway by correlating measurement of patient motivation or engagement in VR/AVGs with practice dosage or intensity. While participants in VR/AVG studies report higher motivation as compared to conventional interventions [222324], conclusions regarding the relationship between motivation and intervention outcomes are limited by lack of consistency and rigour in measurement, including the use of instruments with poor psychometric properties [2223].

The body of research exploring the direct effects of engagement or motivation on motor learning is still in its infancy. Lohse et al. [16] were the first to evaluate whether a more audiovisually enriched as compared to more sterile version of a novel AVG task contributed to skill acquisition and retention in typically developing young adults, finding that participants who played under the enriching condition had greater generalized learning and complex skill retention. Self-reported engagement (User Engagement Scale; UES) was higher in the enriched group, but the only difference in self-reported motivation was in the Effort subscale of the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI), where the enriched group reported less effort as compared to the sterile group. The authors did not find a significant correlation between engagement, motivation and retention scores. A follow-up study using electroencephalography did not replicate the finding that the more enriched practice condition enhanced learning, it did show that more engaged learners had increased information processing, as measured by reduced attentional reserve [25].

Enjoyment, defined as ‘the state or process of taking pleasure in something’ [26], has less frequently been the subject of study in motor learning research, but has become popular as a way of describing patient interaction with VR/AVGs. Enjoyment may be hypothesized to be a precursor to both motivation and engagement. Given that the prevailing marketing of VR/AVGs is that they are ‘fun’ and ‘enjoyable’ [131427], it is important to evaluate its measurement in the context of other constructs.

Motivation, engagement and enjoyment in VR/AVGs may be influenced by the additional constructs of immersion and presence. Immersion is defined as “the extent to which the VR system succeeds in delivering an environment which refocuses a user’s sensations from the real world to a virtual world” [1328]. Immersion is considered as an objective construct referring to how the computational properties of the technology can deliver an illusion of reality through hardware, software, viewing displays and tracking capabilities [2930]. A recent systematic review [13] could not conclusively state effect of immersion on user performance. Immersion is distinct from presence, defined as the “psychological product of technological immersion” [31]. Presence is influenced by many factors, including the characteristics of the user, the VR/AVG task, and the VR/AVG system [28]. While presence is thought to be related to enhanced motivation and performance [32], relationships between this and other constructs of interest require exploration. Table 1 outlines definitions of constructs of interest to this scoping review.

Table 1

Construct definitions

Construct

Definition

Reference

Motivation

Motivation encourages action toward a goal by eliciting and/or sustaining goal-directed behavior.

[16]

Engagement

Engagement is a cognitive and affective quality or experience of a user during an activity.

[16]

Enjoyment

The state or process of taking pleasure in something.

[26]

Immersion

The extent to which the VR system succeeds in delivering an environment which refocuses a user’s sensations from the real world to a virtual world.

[1328]

Presence

The psychological product of technological immersion.

[31]

The purpose of this scoping review is to explore the impact of these affective constructs on motor learning after stroke. This greater understanding will enhance the clinical rationale for VR/AVG use and inform directions for subsequent research. Specifically, our objectives were to:

  1. 1.

    Describe how VR/AVG studies measure or report client enjoyment, motivation, engagement, immersion and presence.

  2. 2.

    Evaluate the extent to which motivation, enjoyment, engagement, immersion, and presence impact motor learning.

  3. 3.

    Propose directional relationships between enjoyment, motivation, engagement, immersion, presence and motor learning.

[…]

 

Continue —> What is the impact of user affect on motor learning in virtual environments after stroke? A scoping review | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

Fig. 2Proposed relationships between the five constructs and motor learning

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[Abstract] Virtual Reality Environment for the Cognitive Rehabilitation of Stroke Patients

Abstract

We present ongoing work to develop a virtual reality environment for the cognitive rehabilitation of patients as a part of their recovery from a stroke. A stroke causes damage to the brain and problem solving, memory and task sequencing are commonly affected. The brain can recover to some extent, however, and stroke patients have to relearn to carry out activities of daily learning. We have created an application called VIRTUE to enable such activities to be practiced using immersive virtual reality. Gamification techniques enhance the motivation of patients such as by making the level of difficulty of a task increase over time. The design and implementation of VIRTUE is presented together with the results of a small acceptability study.

via Virtual Reality Environment for the Cognitive Rehabilitation of Stroke Patients

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[Abstract + References] Improving Motivation in Wrist Rehabilitation Therapies – Conference paper

Abstract

Rehabilitation encompasses a wide variety of activities aimed at reducing the impact of injuries and disabilities by applying different exercises. Frequently, such exercises are carried out at home as a repetition of the same movements or tasks to achieve both motor learning and the necessary cortical changes. Although this increases the patients’ available time for rehabilitation, it may also have some unpleasant side effects. That occurs because carrying out repetitive exercises in a more isolated environment may result in a boring activity that leads patients to give up their rehabilitation. Therefore, patients’ motivation should be considered an essential feature while designing rehabilitation exercises. In this paper, we present how we have faced this need by exploiting novel technology to guide patients in their rehabilitation process. It includes a game crafted to make recovery funny and useful, at the same time. The game and the use we made of the specific hardware follow the recommendations and good practices provided by medical experts.

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[Abstract] Virtual Reality and Cognitive Rehabilitation in People With Stroke: An Overview.

OBJECTIVE:This review evaluates the use of virtual reality (VR) tools in cognitive rehabilitation of stroke-affected individuals.
METHODS:Studies performed between 2010 and 2017 that fulfilled inclusion criteria were selected from PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane, and Web of Sciences databases. The search combined the terms “VR,” “rehabilitation,” and “stroke.”
RESULTS:Stroke patients experienced significant improvement in many cognitive domains (such as executive and visual-spatial abilities and speech, attention, and memory skills) after the use of VR training.
CONCLUSIONS:Rehabilitation using new VR tools could positively affect stroke patient cognitive outcomes by boosting motivation and participation.

via Virtual Reality and Cognitive Rehabilitation in People With Stroke: An Overview. – Abstract – Europe PMC

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[Abstract + Related Articles] Adaptive gameplay and difficulty adjustment in a gamified upper-limb rehabilitation – IEEE Conference Publication

 

Abstract

Lack of motivation during physical rehabilitation is a very common problem that worsens the efficacy of rehabilitation, decreasing the recovery rates of the patient. We suggest a gamified upper-limb rehabilitation that incorporates adaptive gameplay and difficulty so as to overcome that issue, emerging as a support tool for physical therapy professionals. The presence of difficulty adjustment in the game allows a higher motivation level for the patients by preserving the trade off between keeping the difficulty low enough to avoid frustration, but high enough to promote motivation and engagement. This rehabilitation game is a home-based system that allows the patient to exercise at home, due to its Kinect-based portable setup. The game aims to increase the motivation of the patients and thus the speed of their recovery. To accomplish that goal, it is key to potentiate a full immersion into the therapeutic activity. Thus gamification elements, gameplay design and adaptive difficulty are explored and incorporated into the concept.

Related Articles

via Adaptive gameplay and difficulty adjustment in a gamified upper-limb rehabilitation – IEEE Conference Publication

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