Posts Tagged Motor nerve block

[ARTICLE] Effect of high-frequency alternating current transcutaneous stimulation over muscle strength: a controlled pilot study – Full Text

Abstract

Background

High-frequency alternating currents of greater than 1 kHz applied on peripheral nerves has been used in animal studies to produce a motor nerve block. It has been evidenced that frequencies higher than 5 kHz are necessary to produce a complete peripheral nerve block in primates, whose nerve thickness is more similar to humans. The aim of the study was to determine the effect on muscle strength after the application of a high-frequency stimulation at 5 and 10 kHz compared to sham stimulation in healthy volunteers.

Findings

Transcutaneous stimulation at 5 kHz, 10 kHz and sham stimulation were applied to eleven healthy volunteers over the ulnar and median nerves for 20 min. Maximal handgrip strength was measured before, during, immediately after the intervention, and 10 min after the end of intervention. The 10 kHz stimulation showed a lower handgrip strength during the intervention (28.1 N, SEM 3.9) when compared to 5 kHz (31.1 N, SEM 3.6; p < 0.001) and to sham stimulation (33.7 N, SEM 3.9; p < 0.001). Furthermore, only stimulation at 10 kHz decreased handgrip strength when compared to baseline.

Conclusions

These findings suggest high-frequency stimulation has an inhibitory effect over muscle strength. Future studies are required in patients that are characterized by motor hyperactive such as spasticity or tremors.

Background

Previous studies in animals have shown that high-frequency alternating current (HFAC) of greater than 1 kHz applied on exposed peripheral nerves can produce a motor nerve block (Bhadra and Kilgore [12]). An in vivo study, [3] showed that frequencies higher than 5 kHz were able to block nerve conduction of motor fibers. One study [4] in non-injured subjects showed an incomplete block when transcutaneous HFAC applied to the radial nerve at 5 kHz increased somatosensory thresholds. It has been evidenced [5] that frequencies higher than 5 kHz are necessary to produce a complete peripheral nerve block in primates, whose nerve diameter is similar to humans, however, there is not any human study that apply HFAC transcutaneously with frequencies higher than 5 kHz. It is believed that the nerve conduction block produced by application of HFAC could be a useful tool for the treatment of patients with pain or with an exaggerated increase of nerve activity, such as hypertonia or spasms.

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects on maximal handgrip strength (MHS) of a non-invasive HFAC at 5 kHz and 10 kHz applied to the ulnar and median nerves in healthy subjects, compared to a sham stimulation.[…]

 

Continue —> Effect of high-frequency alternating current transcutaneous stimulation over muscle strength: a controlled pilot study | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

Fig. 1

Fig. 1Stimulation effect on maximal handgrip strength. Sham stimulation (circle), 5 kHz (square), and 10 kHz (triangle). Data are represented as mean and standard error. * Indicates significantly different compared to sham stimulation (***p < 0.001; **p < 0.01). + Indicates a significant difference compared to 5 kHz stimulation (++p < 0.01). # Indicates significantly different from baseline (###p < 0.001)

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