Posts Tagged movement therapy

[VIDEO] Wii-based Movement Therapy for stroke rehabilitation

Uploaded on Feb 2, 2012

Neuroscience Research Australia’s Dr Penelope McNulty is using Wii-based movement therapy to help those living with stroke related disabilities regain use of their affected limbs.

The focus of Neuroscience Research Australia, or NeuRA, has always been on neuroscience. We conduct clinical and laboratory research into neurological, psychiatric and psychological disorders.

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[ARTICLE] The effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis: a randomized controlled trial – Full Text PDF

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis.

[Subjects] The subjects were chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis.

[Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to either the control group or experimental group. All subjects received 20 sessions (5 days in a week) of virtual reality movement therapy using the Nintendo Wii. In addition to Wii-based virtual reality movement therapy, experimental group subjects performed mental practice consisting of 5 minutes of relaxation, Wii games imagination, and normalization phases before the beginning of Wii games. To compare the two groups, the upper extremity subtest of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log were performed.

[Results] Both groups showed statistically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of the movement subscale of Motor Activity Log after the interventions. Also, there were significant differences in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log between the two groups.

[Conclusion] Game-based virtual reality movement therapy alone may be helpful to improve functional recovery of the upper extremity, but the addition of MP produces a lager improvement.

Download —> Full Text PDF [567K]

Source: The effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis: a randomized controlled trial

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[Abstract] One-Therapist to Three-Patient Telerehabilitation Robot System for the Upper Limb after Stroke

Abstract

In this paper, a novel one-therapist to three-patient telerehabilitation robot system is developed, which consists of a web-based server computer for therapist at hospital, three telerehabilitation robots for patients at home or in nursing home, three client computers for robot control, and computer networks connect the client computers to the server computer. A kind of light, back-drivable and safe one degree-of-freedom rehabilitation robot with low cost is designed, and a safe control strategy which is combination of PI control and damping control is proposed for the robot control.

Through this telerehabilitation robot system, a therapist can dialogue with post-stroke patients in video communication via the networks, and then he can remotely set or modify the training mode and control parameters of the rehabilitation robots for post-stroke patient training. Haptic based therapy game is also programmed to improve the activity of the patients during training process.

Integrated with database management, the history and current performance data of patients acquired by all sensors of the telerehabilitation robot system during the training process are stored and managed.

Three volunteer individual patients with upper limb disabilities participated in this study. After four weeks of periodic rehabilitation training with the telerehabilitation robot system, the muscle strength and movement coordination of the three patients had been obviously improved.

Our study shows that the one-therapist to three-patient telerehabilitation robot system has good reliability and is able to greatly improve efficiency of the rehabilitation training, which can solve the problem of lack of therapist to a certain extent.

Source: One-Therapist to Three-Patient Telerehabilitation Robot System for the Upper Limb after Stroke – Online First – Springer

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[ARTICLE] The efficacy of Wii-based Movement Therapy for upper limb rehabilitation in the chronic poststroke period: a randomized controlled trial.

Abstract

Background: More effective and efficient rehabilitation is urgently needed to address the prevalence of unmet rehabilitation needs after stroke. This study compared the efficacy of two poststroke upper limb therapy protocols.

Aims and/or hypothesis: We tested the hypothesis that Wii-based movement therapy would be as effective as modified constraint-induced movement therapy for post-stroke upper-limb motor rehabilitation.

Methods: Forty-one patients, 2–46 months poststroke, completed a 14-day program of Wii-based Movement Therapy or modified Constraint-induced Movement Therapy in a dose-matched, assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial, conducted in a research institute or patient’s homes. Primary outcome measures were the Wolf Motor Function Test timed-tasks and Motor Activity Log Quality of Movement scale. Patients were assessed at prebaseline (14 days pretherapy), baseline, post-therapy, and six-month follow-up. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models and repeated measures analysis of variance.

Results: There were no differences between groups for either primary outcome at any time point. Motor function was stable between prebaseline and baseline (P > 0·05), improved with therapy (P  0·05). Wolf Motor Function Test timed-tasks log times improved from 2·1 ± 0·22 to 1·7 ± 0·22 s after Wii-based Movement Therapy, and 2·6 ± 0·23 to 2·3 ± 0·24 s after modified Constraint-induced Movement Therapy. Motor Activity Log Quality of Movement scale scores improved from 67·7 ± 6·07 to 102·4 ± 6·48 after Wii-based Movement Therapy and 64·1 ± 7·30 to 93·0 ± 5·95 after modified Constraint-induced Movement Therapy (mean ± standard error of the mean). Patient preference, acceptance, and continued engagement were higher for Wii-based Movement Therapy than modified Constraint-induced Movement Therapy.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates that Wii-based Movement Therapy is an effective upper limb rehabilitation poststroke with high patient compliance. It is as effective as modified Constraint-induced Movement Therapy for improving more affected upper limb movement and increased independence in activities of daily living.

Continue —>  The efficacy of Wii-based Movement Therapy for upper limb rehabilitation in the chronic poststroke period: a randomized controlled trial – McNulty – 2015 – International Journal of Stroke – Wiley Online Library

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[ARTICLE] Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair

Abstract

Background. Motor deficits after a stroke are thought to be compounded by the development of asymmetric interhemispheric inhibition. Bilateral priming was developed to rebalance this asymmetry and thus improve therapy efficacy.

Objective. This study investigated the effect of bilateral priming before Wii-based Movement Therapy to improve rehabilitation after stroke.

Methods. Ten patients who had suffered a stroke (age, 23-77 years; 3-123 months after stroke) underwent a 14-day program of Wii-based Movement Therapy for upper limb rehabilitation. Formal Wii-based Movement Therapy sessions were immediately preceded by 15 minutes of bilateral priming, whereby active flexion-extension of the less affected wrist drove mirror-symmetric passive movements of the more affected wrist through a custom device. Functional movement was assessed at weeks 0 (before therapy), 3 (after therapy), and 28 (follow-up) using the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), upper limb Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), upper limb range of motion, and Motor Activity Log (MAL). Case-matched controls were patients who had suffered a stroke who received Wii-based Movement Therapy but not bilateral priming.

Results. Upper limb functional ability improved for both groups on all measures tested. Posttherapy improvement on the FMA for primed patients was twice that of the unprimed patients (37.3% vs 14.6%, respectively) and was significantly better maintained at 28 weeks (P = .02). Improvements on the WMFT and MAL were similar for both groups, but the pattern of change in range of motion was strikingly different.

Conclusions. Bilateral priming before Wii-based Movement Therapy led to a greater magnitude and retention of improvement compared to control, especially measured with the FMA. These data suggest that bilateral priming can enhance the efficacy of Wii-based Movement Therapy, particularly for patients with low motor function after a stroke.

via Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair.

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