Posts Tagged Movement

[BOOK] Neurophysiological Basis of Movement – Mark L. Latash – Google books

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Neurophysiological Basis of Movement, Second Edition, has been thoroughly updated and expanded, making it more comprehensive and accessible to students. With eight new chapters and 130 pages of fresh material, this second edition covers a wide range of topics, including movement disorders and current theories of motor control and coordination. By emphasizing the neurophysiological mechanisms relevant to the processes of generating voluntary movements, the text targets advanced undergraduates or beginning graduate students who want to better understand how the brain generates control signals and how the peripheral apparatus executes them.

The new chapters in Neurophysiological Basis of Movement, Second Edition, focus on motor control and motor synergies, prehension, changes in movement with aging, typical and atypical development, neuromuscular peripheral disorders, and disorders of the spinal cord, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and cortex. The text is designed so that instructors can cover all chapters or select the topics most relevant to their specific courses. In addition, this edition of Neurophysiological Basis of Movementoffers these features:

-A new reference section with more than 700 references, providing supplemental resources that encourage students to read and understand research literature on the neurophysiology of movements

-A more reader-friendly presentation of material with an added color, improved illustrations, and introductions to the chapters that provide better transitions

-A new PowerPoint presentation package that includes 8 to 15 slides of art and text for every chapter, helping instructors prepare for lectures and allowing students to better understand the material

Author Mark Latash presents the material using six levels, or worlds, of analysis of the neurophysiology of movements. These worlds are cells, connections, structures, behaviors (control and coordination), evolving and changing behaviors, and motor disorders. The first three levels are the basis for the analysis of a variety of actions, such as standing, locomotion, eye movements, and reaching. Further, changes in movement with fatigue, development, aging, disorder, and rehabilitation are discussed.

The text also presents six labs to help students perform experiments to address typical “template” research problems, and one-minute drills and self-test questions encourage students to think independently and to test their knowledge as they read. The answers to the self-test questions require students to think critically and explain why they selected a particular answer, as the problems have several answers with varying degrees of correctness.

Neurophysiological Basis of Movement, Second Edition, promotes independent thinking and enhances knowledge of basic facts about the design of cells, muscles, neuronal structures, and the whole body for better understanding of typical and atypical movement production related to the nervous system and the functioning brain.

Source: Neurophysiological Basis of Movement – Mark L. Latash – Βιβλία Google

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[Review] Motor Imagery-Based Rehabilitation: Potential Neural Correlates and Clinical Application for Functional Recovery of Motor Deficits after Stroke – Full Text PDF

ABSTRACT:

Motor imagery (MI), defined as the mental implementation of an action in the absence of movement or muscle activation, is a rehabilitation technique that offers a means to replace or restore lost motor function in stroke patients when used in conjunction with conventional physiotherapy procedures. This article briefly reviews the concepts and neural correlates of MI in order to promote improved understanding, as well as to enhance the clinical utility of MI-based rehabilitation regimens. We specifically highlight the role of the cerebellum and basal ganglia, premotor, supplementary motor, and prefrontal areas, primary motor cortex, and parietal cortex. Additionally, we examine the recent literature related to MI and its potential as a therapeutic technique in both upper and lower limb stroke rehabilitation.

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[ARTICLE] Usability evaluation of low-cost virtual reality hand and arm rehabilitation games – Full Text PDF

Abstract

The emergence of lower-cost motion tracking devices enables home-based virtual reality rehabilitation activities and increased accessibility to patients. Currently, little documentation on patients’ expectations for virtual reality rehabilitation is available.

This study surveyed 10 people with stroke for their expectations of virtual reality rehabilitation games. This study also evaluated the usability of three lowercost virtual reality rehabilitation games using a survey and House of Quality analysis. The games (kitchen, archery, and puzzle) were developed in the laboratory to encourage coordinated finger and arm movements.

Lower-cost motion tracking devices, the P5 Glove and Microsoft Kinect, were used to record the movements. People with stroke were found to desire motivating and easy-to-use games with clinical insights and encouragement from therapists. The House of Quality analysis revealed that the games should be improved by obtaining evidence for clinical effectiveness, including clinical feedback regarding improving functional abilities, adapting the games to the user’s changing functional ability, and improving usability of the motion-tracking devices.

This study reports the expectations of people with stroke for rehabilitation games and usability analysis that can help guide development of future games.

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[REVIEW] Hand synergies: Integration of robotics and neuroscience for understanding the control of biological and artificial hands

Highlights

  • Synergies have been extensively studied by neuroscientists to understand the control of multi-joint movements.
  • Synergies are thought to emerge from the interaction of neural and biomechanical factors.
  • The field of robotics has recently exploited the concept of synergies to design and build artificial hands.
  • Neuroscience has leveraged recent advances in robotics research by using novel tools and approaches to study hand control.

Abstract

The term ‘synergy’ – from the Greek synergia – means ‘working together’. The concept of multiple elements working together towards a common goal has been extensively used in neuroscience to develop theoretical frameworks, experimental approaches, and analytical techniques to understand neural control of movement, and for applications for neuro-rehabilitation. In the past decade, roboticists have successfully applied the framework of synergies to create novel design and control concepts for artificial hands, i.e., robotic hands and prostheses. At the same time, robotic research on the sensorimotor integration underlying the control and sensing of artificial hands has inspired new research approaches in neuroscience, and has provided useful instruments for novel experiments.

The ambitious goal of integrating expertise and research approaches in robotics and neuroscience to study the properties and applications of the concept of synergies is generating a number of multidisciplinary cooperative projects, among which the recently finished 4-year European project “The Hand Embodied” (THE). This paper reviews the main insights provided by this framework. Specifically, we provide an overview of neuroscientific bases of hand synergies and introduce how robotics has leveraged the insights from neuroscience for innovative design in hardware and controllers for biomedical engineering applications, including myoelectric hand prostheses, devices for haptics research, and wearable sensing of human hand kinematics. The review also emphasizes how this multidisciplinary collaboration has generated new ways to conceptualize a synergy-based approach for robotics, and provides guidelines and principles for analyzing human behavior and synthesizing artificial robotic systems based on a theory of synergies.

Source: Hand synergies: Integration of robotics and neuroscience for understanding the control of biological and artificial hands

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[Abstract] Hand synergies: Integration of robotics and neuroscience for understanding the control of biological and artificial hands

Highlights

Cover imageSynergies have been extensively studied by neuroscientists to understand the control of movements involving multiple muscles and joints.

The overarching theoretical framework underlying the concept of synergies is that they emerge from the interaction of neural and biomechanical factors. This interaction leads to a reduction in the number of independent degrees of freedom to be controlled.

The field of robotics has recently exploited the concept of synergies to design and build artificial systems, in particular artificial hands, and reduce the complexity associated with controlling a large number of degrees of freedom.

Neuroscience has leveraged recent advances in robotics research by using novel tools and methodological approaches to study how the central nervous system integrates sensory feedback with motor commands for hand control.


Abstract

The term ‘synergy’ – from the Greek synergia – means ‘working together’. The concept of multiple elements working together towards a common goal has been extensively used in neuroscience to develop theoretical frameworks, experimental approaches, and analytical techniques to understand neural control of movement, and for applications for neuro-rehabilitation. In the past decade, roboticists have successfully applied the framework of synergies to create novel design and control concepts for artificial hands, i.e., robotic hands and prostheses. At the same time, robotic research on the sensorimotor integration underlying the control and sensing of artificial hands has inspired new research approaches in neuroscience, and has provided useful instruments for novel experiments.

The ambitious goal of integrating expertise and research approaches in robotics and neuroscience to study the properties and applications of the concept of synergies is generating a number of multidisciplinary cooperative projects, among which the recently finished 4-year European project “The Hand Embodied” (THE). This paper reviews the main insights provided by this framework. Specifically, we provide an overview of neuroscientific bases of hand synergies and introduce how robotics has leveraged the insights from neuroscience for innovative design in hardware and controllers for biomedical engineering applications, including myoelectric hand prostheses, devices for haptics research, and wearable sensing of human hand kinematics. The review also emphasizes how this multidisciplinary collaboration has generated new ways to conceptualize a synergy-based approach for robotics, and provides guidelines and principles for analyzing human behavior and synthesizing artificial robotic systems based on a theory of synergies.

 

Source: Hand synergies: Integration of robotics and neuroscience for understanding the control of biological and artificial hands

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[ARTICLE] Organizing motor imageries – Full Text

Highlights

  • Motor imagery is widely defined as mental rehearsal of movement.
  • Here, motor imagery is characterized based on four different factors.
  • Previous motor imagery studies can be re-interpreted using these four factors.

Abstract

Over the last few decades, motor imagery has attracted the attention of researchers as a prototypical example of ‘embodied cognition’ and also as a basis for neuro-rehabilitation and brain–machine interfaces. The current definition of motor imagery is widely accepted, but it is important to note that various abilities rather than a single cognitive entity are dealt with under a single term. Here, motor imagery has been characterized based on four factors:

  1. motor control
  2. explicitness,
  3. sensory modalities
  4. agency.

Sorting out these factors characterizing motor imagery may explain some discrepancies and variability in the findings from previous studies and will help to optimize a study design in accordance with the purpose of each study in the future.

Somatotopically arranged brain activity during mental rotation (MR) of hands and ...

Somatotopically arranged brain activity during mental rotation (MR) of hands and feet (Hanakawa et al., 2007). Activity greater for the foot MR than for the hand MR (green) is situated dorsal to activity greater for the hand MR than for the foot MR (red). This arrangement agrees with the motor somatotopy of the motor and somatosensory areas where the foot representations are situated dorsal to the hand representations. Primary motor cortex (M1), primary somatosensory cortex (S1), dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), supplementary motor cortex (SMA).

Continue —> Organizing motor imageries

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[ARTICLE] A cohort study investigating a simple, early assessment to predict upper extremity function after stroke – a part of the SALGOT study – Full Text HTML

Abstract

Background: For early prediction of upper extremity function, there is a need for short clinical measurements suitable for acute settings. Previous studies demonstrate correct prediction of function, but have ether included a complex assessment procedure or have an outcome that does not automatically correspond to motor function required to be useful in daily activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a sub-set of items from the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 3 days and 1 month post-stroke could predict the level of upper extremity motor function required for a drinking task at three later stages during the first year post-stroke.

Methods: The level of motor function required for a drinking task was identified with the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for Upper Extremity (FMA-UE). A structured process was used to select ARAT items not requiring special equipment and to find a cut-off level of the items’ sum score. The early prognostic values of the selected items, aimed to determine the level of motor function required for a drinking task at 10 days and 1 and 12 months, were investigated in a cohort of 112 patients. The patients had a first time stroke and impaired upper extremity function at day 3 after stroke onset, were ≥18 years and received care in a stroke unit.

Results: Two items, “Pour water from glass to glass” and “Place hand on top of head”, called ARAT-2, met the requirements to predict upper extremity motor function. ARAT-2 is a sum score (0-6) with a cut-off at 2 points, where >2 is considered an improvement. At the different time points, the sensitivity varied between 98 % and 100 %, specificity between 73 % and 94 %. Correctly classified patients varied between 81 % and 96 %.

Conclusions: Using ARAT-2, 3 days post-stroke could predict the level of motor function (assessed with FMA-UE) required for a drinking task during the first year after a stroke. ARAT-2 demonstrates high predictive values, is easily performed and has the potential to be clinically feasible.

Full Text HTML —>  BMC Neurology | Full text | A cohort study investigating a simple, early assessment to predict upper extremity function after stroke – a part of the SALGOT study.

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