Posts Tagged NAO

[VIDEO] NAO performs physical rehabilitation with CP and OBPP patients (P2) – YouTube

The patient is a male of 9 years old with Brachial Plexus Palsy and a degree of dystonia where muscle contractions cause him twisting and unintentional movements.

This video belongs to a set of evaluations of our autonomous robotic system in the Hospital Virgen del Rocio (Sevilla, Spain) while performing rehabilitation sessions with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy (OBPP) patients.

Planning and Learning Group

http://www.plg.inf.uc3m.es

More info Therapist: http://www.therapist.uma.es

via NAO performs physical rehabilitation with CP and OBPP patients (P2) – YouTube

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[Abstract] Design and Development of a Robot Guided Rehabilitation Scheme for Upper Extremity Rehabilitation

Abstract

To rehabilitate individuals with impaired upper-limb function, we have designed and developed a robot guided rehabilitation scheme. A humanoid robot, NAO was used for this purpose. NAO has 25 degrees of freedom. With its sensors and actuators, it can walk forward and backward, can sit down and stand up, can wave his hand, can speak to the audience, can feel the touch sensation, and can recognize the person he is meeting. All these qualities have made NAO a perfect coach to guide the subjects to perform rehabilitation exercises. To demonstrate rehabilitation exercises with NAO, a library of recommended rehabilitation exercises involving shoulder (i.e., abduction/adduction, vertical flexion/extension, and internal/external rotation), and elbow (i.e., flexion/extension) joint movements was formed in Choregraphe (graphical programming interface). In experiments, NAO was maneuvered to instruct and demonstrate the exercises from the NRL. A complex ‘touch and play’ game was also developed where NAO plays with the subject that represents a multi-joint movement’s exercise. To develop the proposed tele-rehabilitation scheme, kinematic model of human upper-extremity was developed based modified Denavit-Hartenberg notations. A complete geometric solution was developed to find a unique inverse kinematic solution of human upper-extremity from the Kinect data. In tele-rehabilitation scheme, a therapist can remotely tele-operate the NAO in real-time to instruct and demonstrate subjects different arm movement exercises. Kinect sensor was used in this scheme to get tele-operator’s kinematics data. Experiments results reveals that NAO can be tele-operated successfully to instruct and demonstrate subjects to perform different arm movement exercises. A control algorithm was developed in MATLAB for the proposed robot guided supervised rehabilitation scheme. Experimental results show that the NAO and Kinect sensor can effectively be used to supervise and guide the subjects in performing active rehabilitation exercises for shoulder and elbow joint movements.

Recommended Citation
Assad-Uz-Zaman, Md, “Design and Development of a Robot Guided Rehabilitation Scheme for Upper Extremity Rehabilitation” (2017). Theses and Dissertations. 1578.
https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/1578

via “Design and Development of a Robot Guided Rehabilitation Scheme for Upp” by Md Assad-Uz-Zaman

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[WEB SITE] Could robots be counselors? Early research shows positive user experience

 

Many participants in the University of Plymouth study praised the ‘non-judgmental’ nature of the humanoid NAO robot as it delivered its session — with one even saying they preferred it to a human.
Credit: University of Plymouth

New research has shown for the first time that a social robot can deliver a ‘helpful’ and ‘enjoyable’ motivational interview (MI) — a counselling technique designed to support behaviour change.

Many participants in the University of Plymouth study praised the ‘non-judgemental’ nature of the humanoid NAO robot as it delivered its session — with one even saying they preferred it to a human.

Led by the School of Psychology, the study also showed that the robot achieved a fundamental objective of MI as it encouraged participants, who wanted to increase their physical activity, to articulate their goals and dilemmas aloud.

MI is a technique that involves the counsellor supporting and encouraging someone to talk about their need for change, and their reasons for wanting to change.

The role of the interviewer in MI is mainly to evoke a conversation about change and commitment, and the robot was programmed with a set script designed to elicit ideas and conversation on how someone could increase their physical activity.

When finished answering each question, the participant taped the top of NAO’s head to continue, with some sessions lasting up to an hour.

Lead academic Professor Jackie Andrade explained that, because they are perceived as nonjudgmental, robots may have advantages over more humanoid avatars for delivering virtual support for behavioral change.

“We were pleasantly surprised by how easily the participants adapted to the unusual experience of discussing their lifestyle with a robot,” she said. “As we have shown for the first time that a motivational interview delivered by a social robot can elicit out-loud discussion from participants.

“In addition, the participants perceived the interaction as enjoyable, interesting and helpful. Participants found it especially useful to hear themselves talking about their behaviour aloud, and liked the fact that the robot didn’t interrupt, which suggests that this new intervention has a potential advantage over other technology-delivered adaptations of MI.

“Concern about being judged by a human interviewer came across strongly in praise for the non-judgemental nature of the robot, suggesting that robots may be particularly helpful for eliciting talk about sensitive issues.

“The next stage is to undertake a quantitative study, where we can measure whether participants felt that the intervention actually increased their activity levels.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of PlymouthNote: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Joana Galvão Gomes da Silva, David J Kavanagh, Tony Belpaeme, Lloyd Taylor, Konna Beeson, Jackie Andrade. Experiences of a Motivational Interview Delivered by a Robot: Qualitative StudyJournal of Medical Internet Research, 2018; 20 (5): e116 DOI: 10.2196/jmir.7737

via Could robots be counselors? Early research shows positive user experience: New research has shown for the first time that a social robot can deliver a ‘helpful’ and ‘enjoyable’ motivational interview — ScienceDaily

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