Posts Tagged orthosis

[Abstract + References] Virtual Rehabilitation System for Fine Motor Skills Using a Functional Hand Orthosis –

Abstract

This article describes a virtual rehabilitation system with work and entertainment environments to treat fine motor injuries through an active orthosis. The system was developed in the Unity 3D graphic engine, which allows the patient greater immersion in the rehabilitation process through proposed activities; to identify the movement performed, the Myo armband is used, a device capable of receiving and sending the signals obtained to a mathematical algorithm which will classify these signals and activate the physical hand orthosis completing the desired movement. The benefits of the system is the optimization of resources, infrastructure and personnel, since the therapy will be assisted by the same virtual environment, in addition it allows selecting the virtual environment and the activity to be carried out according to the disability present in the patient. The results show the correct functioning of the system performed.

References

1.
Sanchez, J.S., et al.: Virtual Rehabilitation System for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Through Spherical Robots. Accepted 2014
Google Scholar
2.
Naiker, A.: Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSI) – an ayurvedic approach. J. Ayurveda Integr. Med. Sci. 2(2), 170–173 (2017). ISSN 2456-3110
Google Scholar
3.
Rosales, R.S., Martin-Hidalgo, Y., Reboso-Morales, L., Atroshi, I.: Reliability and construct validity of the Spanish version of the 6-item CTS symptoms scale for outcomes assessment in carpal tunnel syndrome. BMC Musculoskelet. Disord. 17, 115 (2016)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4.
Uehli, K., et al.: Sleep problems and work injuries: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sleep Med. Rev. 18(1), 61–73 (2014)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5.
Patti, F., et al.: The impact of outpatient rehabilitation on quality of life in multiple sclerosis. J. Neurol. 249(8), 1027–1033 (2002)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6.
Ueki, S., et al.: Development of a hand-assist robot with multi-degrees-of-freedom for rehabilitation therapy. IEEEASME Trans. Mechatron. 17(1), 136–146 (2012)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7.
Chang, W.H., Kim, Y.-H.: Robot-assisted therapy in stroke rehabilitation. J. Stroke 15(3), 174–181 (2013)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8.
Laver, K., George, S., Thomas, S., Deutsch, J.E., Crotty, M.: Virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation. Stroke 43(2), e20–e21 (2012)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.
Lohse, K.R., Hilderman, C.G.E., Cheung, K.L., Tatla, S., der Loos, H.F.M.V.: Virtual reality therapy for adults post-stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis exploring virtual environments and commercial games in therapy. PLoS ONE 9(3), e93318 (2014)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10.
North, M.M., North, S.M., Coble, J.R.: Virtual reality therapy: an effective treatment for the fear of public speaking. Int. J. Virtual Real. IJVR 03(3), 1–6 (2015)
Google Scholar
11.
Turolla, A., et al.: Virtual reality for the rehabilitation of the upper limb motor function after stroke: a prospective controlled trial. J. Neuroeng. Rehabil. 10, 85 (2013)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12.
Romero, P., León, A., Arteaga, O., Andaluz, V.H., Cruz, M.: Composite materials for the construction of functional orthoses. Accepted 2017
Google Scholar
13.
Benalcázar, M.E., Jaramillo, A.G., Jonathan, A., Zea, A., Páez, V.H.: Andaluz: hand gesture recognition using machine learning and the Myo armband. In: 2017 25th European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO), pp. 1040–1044 (2017)
Google Scholar
14.
Maroukis, B.L., Chung, K.C., MacEachern, M., Mahmoudi, E.: Hand trauma care in the united states: a literature review. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 137(1), 100e–111e (2016)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15.
Feron, L.O., Boniatti, C.M., Arruda, F.Z., Butze, J., Conde, A.: lesões por esforço repetitivo em cirurgiões-dentistas: uma revisão da literatura. Rev. Ciênc. Saúde 16(2), 79–86 (2014)
Google Scholar
16.
Putz-Anderson, V.: Cumulative Trauma Disorders. CRC Press, Boca Raton (2017)
Google Scholar
17.
Oktayoglu, P., Nas, K., Kilinç, F., Tasdemir, N., Bozkurt, M., Yildiz, I.: Assessment of the presence of carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and acromegaly. J. Clin. Diagn. Res. JCDR 9(6), OC14–OC18 (2015)
Google Scholar
18.
Villafañe, J., Cleland, J., Fernánde-de-las-Peñas, C.: the effectiveness of a manual therapy and exercise protocol in patients with thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial. J. Orthop. Sports Phys. Ther. 43(4), 204–213 (2013)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19.
Langer, D., Maeir, A., Michailevich, M., Applebaum, Y., Luria, S.: Using the international classification of functioning to examine the impact of trigger finger. Disabil. Rehabil. 38(26), 2530–2537 (2016)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20.
da Silva Dulci Medeiros, M., Santana, D.V.G., de Souza, G.D., Souza, L.R.Q.: Tenossinovite de Quervain: aspectos diagnósticos. Rev. Med. E Saúde Brasília 5(2), 307–312 (2016)
Google Scholar
21.
Werthel, J.-D., Cortez, M., Elhassan, B.T.: Modified percutaneous trigger finger release. Hand Surg. Rehabil. 35(3), 179–182 (2016)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22.
Chang, K.-H.: Motion Simulation and Mechanism Design with SOLIDWORKS Motion 2016. SDC Publications (2016)
Google Scholar
23.
Andaluz, V.H., Pazmiño, A.M., Pérez, J.A., Carvajal, C.P., Lozada, F., Lascano, J., Carvajal, J.: Training of tannery processes through virtual reality. In: De Paolis, L.T., Bourdot, P., Mongelli, A. (eds.) AVR 2017. LNCS, vol. 10324, pp. 75–93. Springer, Cham (2017).  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60922-5_6
CrossRefGoogle Scholar

via Virtual Rehabilitation System for Fine Motor Skills Using a Functional Hand Orthosis | SpringerLink

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[Abstract + References] Virtual Rehabilitation System for Fine Motor Skills Using a Functional Hand Orthosis – Conference paper

Abstract

This article describes a virtual rehabilitation system with work and entertainment environments to treat fine motor injuries through an active orthosis. The system was developed in the Unity 3D graphic engine, which allows the patient greater immersion in the rehabilitation process through proposed activities; to identify the movement performed, the Myo armband is used, a device capable of receiving and sending the signals obtained to a mathematical algorithm which will classify these signals and activate the physical hand orthosis completing the desired movement. The benefits of the system is the optimization of resources, infrastructure and personnel, since the therapy will be assisted by the same virtual environment, in addition it allows selecting the virtual environment and the activity to be carried out according to the disability present in the patient. The results show the correct functioning of the system performed.

References

  1. 1.
    Sanchez, J.S., et al.: Virtual Rehabilitation System for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Through Spherical Robots. Accepted 2014Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Naiker, A.: Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSI) – an ayurvedic approach. J. Ayurveda Integr. Med. Sci. 2(2), 170–173 (2017). ISSN 2456-3110Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Rosales, R.S., Martin-Hidalgo, Y., Reboso-Morales, L., Atroshi, I.: Reliability and construct validity of the Spanish version of the 6-item CTS symptoms scale for outcomes assessment in carpal tunnel syndrome. BMC Musculoskelet. Disord. 17, 115 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Uehli, K., et al.: Sleep problems and work injuries: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sleep Med. Rev. 18(1), 61–73 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Patti, F., et al.: The impact of outpatient rehabilitation on quality of life in multiple sclerosis. J. Neurol. 249(8), 1027–1033 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ueki, S., et al.: Development of a hand-assist robot with multi-degrees-of-freedom for rehabilitation therapy. IEEEASME Trans. Mechatron. 17(1), 136–146 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Chang, W.H., Kim, Y.-H.: Robot-assisted therapy in stroke rehabilitation. J. Stroke 15(3), 174–181 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Laver, K., George, S., Thomas, S., Deutsch, J.E., Crotty, M.: Virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation. Stroke 43(2), e20–e21 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Lohse, K.R., Hilderman, C.G.E., Cheung, K.L., Tatla, S., der Loos, H.F.M.V.: Virtual reality therapy for adults post-stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis exploring virtual environments and commercial games in therapy. PLoS ONE 9(3), e93318 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    North, M.M., North, S.M., Coble, J.R.: Virtual reality therapy: an effective treatment for the fear of public speaking. Int. J. Virtual Real. IJVR 03(3), 1–6 (2015)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Turolla, A., et al.: Virtual reality for the rehabilitation of the upper limb motor function after stroke: a prospective controlled trial. J. Neuroeng. Rehabil. 10, 85 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Romero, P., León, A., Arteaga, O., Andaluz, V.H., Cruz, M.: Composite materials for the construction of functional orthoses. Accepted 2017Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Benalcázar, M.E., Jaramillo, A.G., Jonathan, A., Zea, A., Páez, V.H.: Andaluz: hand gesture recognition using machine learning and the Myo armband. In: 2017 25th European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO), pp. 1040–1044 (2017)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Maroukis, B.L., Chung, K.C., MacEachern, M., Mahmoudi, E.: Hand trauma care in the united states: a literature review. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 137(1), 100e–111e (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Feron, L.O., Boniatti, C.M., Arruda, F.Z., Butze, J., Conde, A.: lesões por esforço repetitivo em cirurgiões-dentistas: uma revisão da literatura. Rev. Ciênc. Saúde 16(2), 79–86 (2014)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Putz-Anderson, V.: Cumulative Trauma Disorders. CRC Press, Boca Raton (2017)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Oktayoglu, P., Nas, K., Kilinç, F., Tasdemir, N., Bozkurt, M., Yildiz, I.: Assessment of the presence of carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and acromegaly. J. Clin. Diagn. Res. JCDR 9(6), OC14–OC18 (2015)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Villafañe, J., Cleland, J., Fernánde-de-las-Peñas, C.: the effectiveness of a manual therapy and exercise protocol in patients with thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial. J. Orthop. Sports Phys. Ther. 43(4), 204–213 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Langer, D., Maeir, A., Michailevich, M., Applebaum, Y., Luria, S.: Using the international classification of functioning to examine the impact of trigger finger. Disabil. Rehabil. 38(26), 2530–2537 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    da Silva Dulci Medeiros, M., Santana, D.V.G., de Souza, G.D., Souza, L.R.Q.: Tenossinovite de Quervain: aspectos diagnósticos. Rev. Med. E Saúde Brasília 5(2), 307–312 (2016)Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Werthel, J.-D., Cortez, M., Elhassan, B.T.: Modified percutaneous trigger finger release. Hand Surg. Rehabil. 35(3), 179–182 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Chang, K.-H.: Motion Simulation and Mechanism Design with SOLIDWORKS Motion 2016. SDC Publications (2016)Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Andaluz, V.H., Pazmiño, A.M., Pérez, J.A., Carvajal, C.P., Lozada, F., Lascano, J., Carvajal, J.: Training of tannery processes through virtual reality. In: De Paolis, L.T., Bourdot, P., Mongelli, A. (eds.) AVR 2017. LNCS, vol. 10324, pp. 75–93. Springer, Cham (2017).  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60922-5_6CrossRefGoogle Scholar

via Virtual Rehabilitation System for Fine Motor Skills Using a Functional Hand Orthosis | SpringerLink

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[Case Report] Case report on the use of a functional electrical orthosis in rehabilitation of upper limb function in a chronic stroke patient – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Introduction. The increasing incidence of strokes and their occurrence in younger active people require the development of solutions that allow participation, despite the debilitating deficit that is not always solved by rehabilitation. The present report shows
such a potential solution.
Objective. In this presentation we will show the effects of using a functional electric orthosis, the high number of repetitions and daily electrostimulation in a young stroke patient with motor deficit in the upper limb, the difficulties encountered in attempting to
use orthosis, the results and the course of its recovery over the years.
Materials and Methods. The present report shows the evolution of a 31-year-old female patient with hemiplegia, resulting from a hemorrhagic stroke, from the moment of surgery to the moment of purchasing a functional electrical orthosis and a few months
later, highlighting a 3-week period when the training method focused on performing a large number of repetitions of a single exercise helped by the orthosis – 3 weekly physical therapy sessions, with a duration of one hour and 15 minutes, plus 2 electrostimulation sessions lasting 20 minutes each and 100 elbow extension, daily, 6 times a week. The patient was evaluated and filmed at the beginning and end of the 3 week period. The patient’s consent was obtained for the use of the data and images presented.
Results. Invalidating motor deficiency and problems specific to the use of upper limb functional electrostimulation in patients with stroke sequelae (flexion synergy, exaggeration of reflex response, wrist position during stimulation, etc.) made it impossible to use orthosis in functional activities within ADL although it allowed the achievement of a single task. Evaluation on the FuglMayer assessment does not show any quantifiable progress, although it is possible to have slightly improved the control of the
shoulder and elbow and increased the speed of task execution.
Conclusions. The use of functional orthoses of this type may be useful in patients who still have a significant functional rest in the shoulder, elbow and hand, and where the orthosis can produce an effective grasp. However for some patients, perhaps those who
would have been desirable to benefit most from this treatment, the benefit of using this orthosis is minimal.[…]

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[ARTICLE] The impact of ankle–foot orthoses on toe clearance strategy in hemiparetic gait: a cross-sectional study – Full Text

Abstract

Background

Ankle–foot orthoses (AFOs) are frequently used to improve gait stability, toe clearance, and gait efficiency in individuals with hemiparesis. During the swing phase, AFOs enhance lower limb advancement by facilitating the improvement of toe clearance and the reduction of compensatory movements. Clinical monitoring via kinematic analysis would further clarify the changes in biomechanical factors that lead to the beneficial effects of AFOs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual impact of AFOs on toe clearance, and determine the best strategy to achieve toe clearance (including compensatory movements) during the swing phase.

Methods

This study included 24 patients with hemiparesis due to stroke. The gait performance of these patients with and without AFOs was compared using three-dimensional treadmill gait analysis. A kinematic analysis of the paretic limb was performed to quantify the contribution of the extent of lower limb shortening and compensatory movements (such as hip elevation and circumduction) to toe clearance. The impact of each movement related to toe clearance was assessed by analyzing the change in the vertical direction.

Results

Using AFOs significantly increased toe clearance (p = 0.038). The quantified limb shortening and pelvic obliquity significantly differed between gaits performed with versus without AFOs. Among the movement indices related to toe clearance, limb shortening was increased by the use of AFOs (p < 0.0001), while hip elevation due to pelvic obliquity (representing compensatory strategies) was diminished by the use of AFOs (p = 0.003). The toe clearance strategy was not significantly affected by the stage of the hemiparetic condition (acute versus chronic) or the type of AFO (thermoplastic AFOs versus adjustable posterior strut AFOs).

Conclusions

Simplified three-dimensional gait analysis was successfully used to quantify and visualize the impact of AFOs on the toe clearance strategy of hemiparetic patients. AFO use increased the extent of toe clearance and limb shortening during the swing phase, while reducing compensatory movements. This approach to visualization of the gait strategy possibly contributes to clinical decision-making in the real clinical settings.

Background

Impaired paretic limb advancement is a clearly observable manifestation of gait pathology in individuals with hemiparesis due to stroke [123]. Previous studies have reported specific gait changes following hemiparesis, such as decreased knee flexion, hip flexion, and ankle dorsiflexion during the swing phase, which can negatively influence the achievement of toe clearance [123456]. Reduction in toe clearance of the affected limb leads to tripping while walking, which is a major cause of falls [78]. In healthy individuals, toe clearance is mainly achieved by limb shortening, which is affected by hip flexion, knee flexion, and ankle dorsiflexion. On the other hand, to obtain sufficient toe clearance during the swing phase, individuals with hemiparesis often require compensatory strategies that modify the kinematic pattern, including hip hiking and circumduction, which are common gait deviations [39]. These changes during the swing phase have a reciprocal relationship. When the limb shortening is reduced due to paresis, the compensatory movements will be increased to contribute to toe clearance; hence, they are in a trade-off relationship [10].

Ankle–foot orthoses (AFOs) are frequently prescribed to improve walking ability in hemiparetic patients, as they provide passive or dynamic support of ankle movement. AFOs provide support not only during the stance phase of gait by encouraging lateral stability or improving early stance knee moments, but also in the swing phase to maintain ankle dorsiflexion and facilitate toe clearance [11121314151617]. The effect of AFOs on the swing phase is additionally reflected in the compensatory movements. Cruz et al. [18] demonstrated that the compensatory pelvic obliquity observed in response to impaired ankle dorsiflexion in hemiplegic patients was minimized when the patients wore an AFO. Improved joint motions and decreased compensatory movement when using AFOs could potentially contribute to an efficient gait and promote walking activity in hemiparetic patients.

Clarification of the mechanical effect of AFOs on these gait parameters, and quantifications of compensatory movements would be helpful for clinical decision-making in rehabilitation clinics. For example, understanding the influence of rehabilitative training and the use of AFOs on gait indices (i.e., ankle angle, knee angle, hip elevation, or toe clearance) would help to determine the best rehabilitative strategy and to identify the need for AFO use in individual patients.

The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanical effect of AFOs and to quantify the impact of AFO use on hemiparetic gait pattern during the swing phase, as this information would be helpful for clinical decision-making in rehabilitation clinics. For example, understanding the influence of rehabilitative training and the AFO and its types on gait indices (i.e., ankle angle, knee angle, hip elevation, or toe clearance) would help to determine the best rehabilitative strategy and to investigate the need for AFO use in individual patients. Based on a prior study showing the relationship between limb shortening and compensatory movements [10], we hypothesized that the AFOs would positively affect functional limb shortening in a way that would consequently impact on toe clearance and compensatory maneuvers, particularly represented by hip elevation. Previous studies have shown the effects of AFOs and a relationship between limb shortening and compensatory movements. In the normal gait pattern, functional limb shortening (representing lower limb joint movement) is a main strategy for toe clearance. However, patients with hemiparesis have impaired lower limb function, and thus require compensatory strategies (e.g., hip hiking, circumduction of the paretic limb) to promote swing phase propulsion [1920]. Additionally, the extent of toe clearance is mainly determined by the extent of functional limb shortening and hip elevation as compensatory movements, which are in a trade-off relationship [10]. AFO usage reduces the gait pattern deviation and increases the walking ability, thereby reducing energy costs [2122]. In this study, we hypothesized that the AFOs would positively affect functional limb shortening in a way that would consequently impact on toe clearance and compensatory maneuvers, particularly represented by hip elevation. To determine the actual impact of limb shortening and compensatory movements on toe clearance, the vertical component of the movements that comprised toe clearance was calculated using three-dimensional kinematic motion analysis. The changes in joint angles were also investigated.[…]

Continue —> The impact of ankle–foot orthoses on toe clearance strategy in hemiparetic gait: a cross-sectional study | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

Figure 1

Fig. 1 Marker placement. The positions of 12 measurement markers (bilateral acromion, iliac crest, hip, knee, ankle and toe)

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[WEB SITE] Myomo – My own motion

Even if you haven’t moved your hand and arm in years due to a neuromuscular injury or disease, it is possible the MyoPro® may be able to help you use your arm and hand again.

Myopro 2My Own Motion

Myomo empowers individuals with a neuromuscular condition who have lost movement in a hand and arm to perform activities of everyday life. Myomo offers the MyoPro, a myoelectric elbow/wrist/hand orthosis (powered brace) to support the weak arm and enable patients to move an impaired hand and arm again.  MyoPro is the only product of its kind for people who suffer from debilitating neurological disorders such as brachial plexus injury, brain or spinal cord injury, CVA stroke, multiple sclerosis or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

MyoPro is covered by most commercial insurance companies in the U.S., and by the U.S. Veterans Administration – click here for more information for veterans.[…]

 

VISIT SITE —>  Home | Myomo

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[Abstract] Case Report on the Use of a Custom Myoelectric Elbow–Wrist–Hand Orthosis for the Remediation of Upper Extremity Paresis and Loss of Function in Chronic Stroke.

Abstract:

Introduction: This case study describes the application of a commercially available, custom myoelectric elbow–wrist–hand orthosis (MEWHO), on a veteran diagnosed with chronic stroke with residual left hemiparesis. The MEWHO provides powered active assistance for elbow flexion/extension and 3 jaw chuck grip. It is a noninvasive orthosis that is driven by the user’s electromyographic signal. Experience with the MEWHO and associated outcomes are reported.

Materials and Methods: The participant completed 21 outpatient occupational therapy sessions that incorporated the use of a custom MEWHO without grasp capability into traditional occupational therapy interventions. He then upgraded to an advanced version of that MEWHO that incorporated grasp capability and completed an additional 14 sessions. Range of motion, strength, spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale [MAS]), the Box and Blocks test, the Fugl–Meyer assessment and observation of functional tasks were used to track progress. The participant also completed a home log and a manufacturers’ survey to track usage and user satisfaction over a 6-month period.

Results: Active left upper extremity range of motion and strength increased significantly (both with and without the MEWHO) and tone decreased, demonstrating both a training and an assistive effect. The participant also demonstrated an improved ability to incorporate his affected extremity (with the MEWHO) into a wide variety of bilateral, gross motor activities of daily living such as carrying a laundry basket, lifting heavy objects (e.g. a chair), using a tape measure, meal preparation, and opening doors.

Conclusion: Custom myoelectric orthoses offer an exciting opportunity for individuals diagnosed with a variety of neurological conditions to make advancements toward their recovery and independence, and warrant further research into their training effects as well as their use as assistive devices.

Source: EBSCOhost | 123998452 | Case Report on the Use of a Custom Myoelectric Elbow–Wrist–Hand Orthosis for the Remediation of Upper Extremity Paresis and Loss of Function in Chronic Stroke.

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[Conference paper] Virtual Environments for Motor Fine Skills Rehabilitation with Force Feedback – Abstract+References

Abstract

In this paper, it is proposed an application to stimulate the motor fine skills rehabilitation by using a bilateral system which allows to sense the upper limbs by ways of a device called Leap Motion. This system is implemented through a human-machine interface, which allows to visualize in a virtual environment the feedback forces sent by a hand orthosis which was printed and designed in an innovative way using NinjaFlex material, it is also commanded by four servomotors that eases the full development of the proposed tasks. The patient is involved in an assisted rehabilitation based on therapeutic exercises, which were developed in several environments and classified due to the patient’s motor degree disability. The experimental results show the efficiency of the system which is generated by the human-machine interaction, oriented to develop human fine motor skills.

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Source: Virtual Environments for Motor Fine Skills Rehabilitation with Force Feedback | SpringerLink

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[BLOG POST] Which Saebo Hand Rehabilitation Device is Right For You? – Saebo

 


In 2001, two occupational therapists had one goal: to provide neurological clients access to transformative and life-changing products for improving arm and hand function. Frustrated with the current devices on the market that were limited, expensive, and inaccessible for home use, the founders were inspired to create new, revolutionary solutions.

What started as a dream has now become Saebo, a global provider of affordable rehabilitative products designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 200,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence.

At Saebo, we have three core product lines for hand rehabilitation: The SaeboFlex, SaeboGlove, and SaeboStretch. These three products have helped numerous people overcome limited motor function after suffering a stroke or other neurological or orthopedic condition.

We would love for you to get to know more about these three products and learn about why they work, and more importantly, who they can help. We have committed to making products that are unique and based on the most recent research and evidence available. Learn about three of our unique products:

 

 

SaeboFlex

The SaeboFlex is a high-profile orthosis with an outrigger system that covers the back of hand, fingertips and forearm. This orthosis positions the wrist and fingers into extension to prepare them for object manipulation. With the assistance of the SaeboFlex, the user is able to grasp objects by voluntarily flexing his or her fingers. Once the fingers relax (stop gripping), the extension spring system assists in re-opening the hand to release the object.

Saebo’s functional dynamic orthoses are specifically designed for people suffering from a neurological injury such as a stroke, head injury, and incomplete spinal cord injury. The SaeboFlex gives people the ability to perform grasp-and-release activities, which allows them to participate in task-oriented hand training. Evidence-based research supports this training as critical to recovery. The SaeboFlex is appropriate for individuals with minimal to severe tone/spasticity.

Here is an example of a man trying to pick up a ball six weeks after his stroke with and without the SaeboFlex. You can also see his improvement after six months of training:

SaeboGlove

The SaeboGlove is a low-profile, lightweight glove that helps clients suffering from neurological and orthopedic injuries incorporate their hand functionally in therapy and at home. The proprietary tension system has elastic bands that offer various tensions for individual finger joints. The tension system extends the client’s fingers and thumb following grasping and assists with hand opening.

The ideal candidate for the SaeboGlove is suffering from minimal to no spasticity or contracture. People with more severe soft-tissue shortening would need a high-profile orthosis like the SaeboFlex. For appropriate candidates, the SaeboGlove can be worn to assist with day-to-day functional tasks and during grasp-and-release exercises/activities. This new-found freedom leads to improved motor recovery and functional independence.

This video shows a man attempting grasp-and-release activities with and without the assistance of the SaeboGlove:

SaeboStretch

The SaeboStretch is a soft and adjustable dynamic resting hand splint recognizable for its unique strapping system. This splint is worn to stretch and prevent soft-tissue shortening and helps neurologically impaired clients maintain or improve motion. Saebo’s energy-storing technology allows individuals suffering from spasticity to stretch comfortably and safely, resulting in increased motivation and compliance.

The SaeboStretch is appropriate for people suffering from minimal to moderate spasticity. The orthosis includes the choice of three tension plates that offer various levels of resistance depending on the amount of tone and spasticity the individual has. The flexible hand plates also prevent or minimize joint pain and deformities. The SaeboStretch can be worn during the day or when sleeping.

See how the SaeboStretch is custom fit to the individual in this video:

Our Expert Recommendations

Over the last ten years, Saebo has grown into a leading global provider of rehabilitative products created through the unrelenting leadership and the strong network of clinicians around the world. We are growing this commitment to affordability and accessibility even further by making our newest, most innovative products more available than ever.

If your loved one is recovering from a neurological or orthopedic injury and wants to know if one of Saebo’s products is right for them, take our free 5-minute evaluation. Completing this survey will provide all of the information needed to ensure the best possible product recommendations. Upon completion of your survey, you will receive personalized suggestions tailored to your specific needs and abilities. In addition, our Product Specialists will be happy to review these recommendations with your physician or therapist.


All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

Source: Which Saebo Hand Rehabilitation Device is Right For You? | Saebo

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[WEB SITE] Foot Drop: Causes, Prevention and How You can Treat It

What is foot drop & what causes it?

Foot drop is a simple name but its cause and treatment may be less than simple.

If you are unable to lift your foot up at the ankle and it makes walking difficult, you may have something called foot drop. This could be due to weakness in one of the muscles responsible for lifting, or dorsiflexing, your foot. It could also be caused by tightness or spasticity in the calf muscles of your leg that cause your toes to point downward.

The cause of foot drop can be from several different sources – neurological, muscular, a side effect from medication, or from a lack of movement.

People with stroke, multiple sclerosis, acquired brain injury, spinal cord injury, or cerebral palsy have a central neurological reason causing weakness, tightness or spasticity. People with peripheral neurologic disease may also have foot drop. These diagnoses could include neuropathy, injury to the lower spinal cord, nerve damage, or illnesses like Guillain-Barre syndrome.

Those who have a traumatic accident or muscular damage could also suffer from foot drop because of damage from swelling and compression.

Certain medications are known to potentially cause foot drop. Talk to your doctor about your medications.

Foot drop can also occur in people who are in bed for a prolonged amount of time. When lying on your back, gravity pulls down your foot, and can cause weakness and overstretch the muscles and nerves on the front of your lower leg.

Can foot drop be prevented?

If you or your loved one is required to be on bedrest or immobile, you can help to prevent foot drop by using a padded splint, by doing stretching, and by doing active exercises like ankle pumps.

If you have an underlying condition, it may be impossible to fully prevent foot drop from occurring. But often you can improve the flexibility and strength in your leg, or use an orthosis or splint to help maintain your foot in a position that will allow you to walk and move safely.

How can foot drop be treated?

The treatment of foot drop depends on the cause and the symptoms you have. Below are some suggestions on what you can do, but make sure to talk to your doctor, therapist or orthotist about the best treatment options for you.

Keep your foot and ankle flexible:

  • Use a foot splint at night

  • Complete daily stretches. The ProStretch gives a great stretch

Improve the tone in your leg:

  • Use an orthosis that puts your ankle in a slight stretch

Strengthen your leg:

  • Use neuromuscular electrical stimulation

  • Complete exercises against gravity or with resistance like a Theraband

  • Stand on a variety of surfaces like an Airex balance pad or a Bosu ball to challenge your muscles in your legs. Hold onto something sturdy or have someone nearby to help

Improve the safety of your walking and prevent falls:

  • Use an ankle foot orthosis to keep your toes up when walking. Depending on your strength level, you may need a flexible one or a rigid one

  • Walk with an assistive device, like a walker or cane

  • Modify your home to prevent you from tripping or falling – consider removing rugs and floor clutter, sitting on a shower chair instead of standing, and observe your home for other potential hazards

Prevent skin problems with the use of splints and orthotics:

  • Make sure to check your skin after you’ve been wearing it, and more often if you have impaired sensation in your legs, diabetes, or a history of wounds. Use a hand held inspection mirror to help

Keep the rest of yourself of healthy:

  • Consider activities like stationary biking or swimming to complete overall strengthening and conditioning

  • Strengthen your core muscles to improve your overall balance and stability

What are the dangers of not treating foot drop?

The biggest risk of not treating foot drop is tripping and falling. Falls lead to injury and other unnecessary treatments or hospitalizations. In order to clear your toes to avoid falling, you will have to change the way you walk. Over time, this could lead to pain or discomfort in your back or legs. Also, if your ankle loses flexibility and you cannot move it at you may need surgery.

Most importantly, without treatment you will have more difficulty doing the things in life that you enjoy doing. Unfortunately, there may be no cure, but there are things you can do to help improve the quality of your life.

Who should I ask for more information?

If you have already been diagnosed or are concerned about your risk for foot drop, you should speak with your healthcare provider about what you can do to prevent and treat it.

Source: Foot Drop: Causes, Prevention and How You can Treat It

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[Abstract] Upper limb motor training using a Saebo™ orthosis is feasible for increasing task-specific practice in hospital after stroke. – Australian Occupational Therapy Journal

Abstract

Background/aim

Assistive technologies have the potential to increase the amount of movement practice provided during inpatient stroke rehabilitation. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the Saebo-Flex device in a subacute stroke setting to increase task-specific practice for people with little or no active hand movement. The secondary aim was to collect preliminary data comparing hand/upper limb function between a control group that received usual rehabilitation and an intervention group that used, in addition, the Saebo-Flex device.

Methods

Nine inpatients (mean three months (median six weeks) post-stroke) participated in this feasibility study conducted in an Australian rehabilitation setting, using a randomised pre-test and post-test design with concealed allocation and blinded outcome assessment. In addition to usual rehabilitation, the intervention group received eight weeks of daily motor training using the Saebo-Flex device. The control group received usual rehabilitation (task-specific motor training) only. Participants were assessed at baseline (pre-randomisation) and at the end of the eight-week study period. Feasibility was assessed with respect to ease of recruitment, application of the device, compliance with the treatment programme and safety. Secondary outcome measures included the Motor Assessment Scale (upper limb items), Box and Block Test, grip strength and the Stroke Impact Scale.

Results

Recruitment to the study was very slow because of the low number of patients with little or no active hand movement. Otherwise, the study was feasible in terms of being able to apply the Saebo-Flex device and compliance with the treatment programme. There were no adverse events, and a greater amount of upper limb rehabilitation was provided to the intervention group. While there were trends in favour of the intervention group, particularly for dexterity, no between-group differences were seen for any of the secondary outcomes.

Conclusions

This pilot feasibility study showed that the use of assistive technology, specifically the Saebo-Flexdevice, could be successfully used in a sample of stroke patients with little or no active hand movement. However, recruitment to the trial was very slow. The use of the Saebo-FlexTM device had variable results on outcomes, with some positive trends seen in hand function, particularly dexterity.

Source: Upper limb motor training using a Saebo™ orthosis is feasible for increasing task-specific practice in hospital after stroke – Lannin – 2016 – Australian Occupational Therapy Journal – Wiley Online Library

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