Posts Tagged Parenting

[WEB SITE] Parenting After Brain Injury

Parenting After Brain Injury

Parenting is a challenging life role for all people, yet one of the most valued roles within society. Brain Injury frequently occurs at a life stage where people are yet to complete their parenting responsibilities. For people with acquired brain injury (ABI), facing cognitive, physical, communication, behavioural and psychological challenges, parenting can present complex challenges. In addition, persons with ABI often face societal and environmental barriers. These fact sheets have been developed to assist parents with an ABI and their partners to improve their knowledge and skills to meet the ongoing challenges of parenting. family walking together
little girl finger painting boy doing his homework two little girls arguing

Encouraging your
Developing Child

Setting Routines

Managing Behaviour

Other Useful Parenting Website Links and Resources

Parenting Fact Sheet References and Acknowledgements
Return to Support for Families

Contact ABIOS
abios@health.qld.gov.au

Last updated: 20 March 2017

via Parenting After Brain Injury | Queensland Health

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[BLOG POST] Parenting After Brain Injury – Neuro Landscape

PARENTING AFTER BRAIN INJURY

While there are no prerequisites for the job, parenthood is a lifelong responsibility. It is also one of the most fulfilling and important roles a person can have in life. Brain injury, unfortunately, impacts individuals without regard to their roles and responsibilities.

Persons with brain injury are challenged in their ability to care for themselves, much less others, making parenting more difficult. Yet, in order to achieve long-term success post-injury, family reintegration, including parenting, is imperative. And the best way to achieve this is through skill redevelopment during postacute rehabilitation.

The Basics Still Apply, Before and After Brain Injury

Parenting requires the ability to not only care for oneself, but to do so often in deference to caring for children. Parents are frequently required to subjugate their needs and wishes to the importance of providing for the well-being, nurturing, education, safety, development, and future of their children.

This requires a mindful approach, planning with a spouse or partner, or managing alone with family and friends to provide for housing, food, clothing, and education all the while seeking to instill family and societal values. Most parents want their children to be safe and to have a future that is the same as or better than their own.

Raising children presents a range of personal challenges to most parents. It may require developing a willingness for selflessness while acquiring skills as a teacher, mentor, role model, and disciplinarian, at least. Many couples acknowledge that arriving at a parenting style can be arduous and the source of conflict in their relationship as they negotiate stylistic differences and determine and articulate behavioral, educational, value, and moral expectations for their children.

Relearning Parenting Skills is Vital to Family Integration

After brain injury, however, individuals tend to become more focused on themselves, and fail to provide the same kind of parenting approach/skills as they exerted prior to injury. They are likely to be much less involved in child rearing, in general, failing to participate in determining, communicating, and facilitating goals for their children. These responsibilities either are not met well, or fall entirely to a non-injured spouse, partner, or family member.

Active discussions must be undertaken with an individual and/or couple to raise awareness of the importance of assessment and intervention for parenting skills, and to actively intervene to redevelop such skills and focus within the family. Family members must be relied upon to build an understanding of parenting skills and styles prior to injury as well as parenting-related family dynamics so as to serve as goals for treatment.

These efforts must focus not only on reacquisition of parenting styles and skills, but also on parental engagement with children in accordance with the manner in which they engaged prior to injury. Finally, teaching must include knowledge of common reactions children may have to the temporary or permanent loss of a parent to injury. Counseling can be extremely effective in raising awareness of these issues and changing behaviors within a family system. Counseling can incorporate other family members such as spouses/partners, children themselves, or key extended family members with meaningful insights such as close aunts/uncles or grandparents. Re-engagement within a family system to the various roles one played prior to injury is critical to the long-term success of family reintegration.

 

via Parenting After Brain Injury – Neuro Landscape

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[WEB SITE] Studies uncover long-term effects of traumatic brain injury

Doctors are beginning to get answers to the question that every parent whose child has had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) wants to know: What will my child be like 10 years from now?

In a study to be presented Friday Feb. 10 at the annual meeting of the Association of Academic Physiatrists in Las Vegas, researchers from Cincinnati Children’s will present research on long-term effects of TBI—an average of seven years after injury. Patients with mild to moderate brain injuries are two times more likely to have developed , and those with severe injuries are five times more likely to develop secondary ADHD. These researchers are also finding that the family environment influences the development of these attention problems.

  • Parenting and the exert a powerful influence on recovery. Children with severe TBI in optimal environments may show few effects of their injuries while children with milder injuries from disadvantaged or chaotic homes often demonstrate persistent problems.
  • Early family response may be particularly important for long-term outcomes suggesting that working to promote effective parenting may be an important early intervention.
  • Certain skills that can affect social functioning, such as speed of information processing, inhibition, and reasoning, show greater .
  • Many children do very well long-term after brain injury and most do not have across the board deficits.

More than 630,000 children and teenagers in the United States are treated in emergency rooms for TBI each year. But predictors of recovery following TBI, particularly the roles of genes and environment, are unclear. These environmental factors include family functioning, parenting practices, home environment, and socioeconomic status. Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s are working to identify genes important to recovery after TBI and understand how these genes may interact with to influence recovery.

  • They will be collecting salivary DNA samples from more than 330 children participating in the Approaches and Decisions in Acute Pediatric TBI Trial.
  • he primary outcome will be global functioning at 3, 6, and 12 months post injury, and secondary outcomes will include a comprehensive assessment of cognitive and behavioral functioning at 12 months post injury.
  • This project will provide information to inform individualized prognosis and treatment plans.

Using neuroimaging and other technologies, scientists are also learning more about brain structure and connectivity related to persistent symptoms after TBI. In a not-yet-published Cincinnati Children’s study, for example, researchers investigated the structural connectivity of brain networks following aerobic training. The recovery of structural connectivity they discovered suggests that aerobic training may lead to improvement in symptoms.

Over the past two decades, investigators at Cincinnati Children’s have conducted a series of studies to develop and test interventions to improve cognitive and behavioral outcomes following pediatric . They developed an innovative web-based program that provides family-centered training in problem-solving, communication, and self-regulation.

  • Across a series of randomized trials, online family problem-solving treatment has been shown to reduce behavior problems and executive dysfunction (management of cognitive processes) in older children with TBI, and over the longer-term improved everyday functioning in 12-17 year olds.
  • Web-based parenting skills programs targeting younger children have resulted in improved parent-child interactions and reduced behavior problems. In a computerized pilot trial of attention and memory, children had improvements in sustained attention and parent-reported executive function behaviors. These intervention studies suggest several avenues for working to improve short- and long-term recovery following TBI.

Explore further: Drug shown to aid injured adult brains may exacerbate cognitive problems in children

Source: Studies uncover long-term effects of traumatic brain injury

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[BROCHURE] Parenting for Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury – PDF

INTRODUCTION

If you are experiencing any challenges with parenting, know that you are not alone. We hope that this information will help you become more confident and satisfied with the important job of raising your children. Parenting can be challenging for anyone. Unfortunately, the problems that happen after traumatic brain injury (TBI) can make parenting even more of a challenge. In this brochure we describe how TBI can affect parenting. Next we discuss some of common challenges faced by parents with TBI. We also offer some suggestions or tips to help parents deal with these challenges. Lastly, we include information and resources about where to go for more help.

Get the BROSHURE

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