Posts Tagged physical therapy

[WEB SITE] Virtual Reality is Finding a Home in Physical Therapy

Credit to: Neuro Rehab VR

Virtual reality has plenty of applications for fitness — you’re here, so you already know that. However, it is increasingly becoming a tool for rehabilitation, as well. Neuro Rehab VR aims to make physical therapy more enjoyable, and it promises to help patients more than traditional physical therapy.

Making physical therapy fun

With only about one-third of patients fully adhering to their rehabilitation plans, Neuro Rehab VR’s goal was to create a platform that was more engaging without making things more cumbersome. During the early days of the Oculus Rift, with its many sensors, that was not possible.

This was made possible with the Oculus Quest, which eliminated the need for extra equipment or wires. Neuro Rehab VR provides several different exercise applications that run patients through less-abstract goals, such as going grocery shopping. The applications are available for the entire body, and also include sports and combat.

In addition to being more interesting, VR physical therapy can have more effective results. Because of  the brain’s neuroplasticity, Neuro Rehab VR says playing games can establish better connections in the brain as you work toward concrete goals. This can, in turn, lead to more complete recovery. Neuro Rehab VR is partnered with Fort Worth’s Neurological Recovery Center. It has dealt with patients of spinal injuries, brain injuries, strokes, and multiple sclerosis. The team decided to expand and make its systems available elsewhere after seeing its success.

Neuro Rehab VR believes its systems can work not only in hospitals, but also for in-home recovery. The low cost of the Quest itself makes it affordable for rental or purchase by the patient. Therapists can see every movement patients make to determine if they are doing exercises correctly. Once the patient is feeling better, they’ll still have a device capable of helping them stay fit from within their home.

via Virtual Reality is Finding a Home in Physical Therapy

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[Abstract] Soymilk ingestion immediately after therapeutic exercise enhances rehabilitation outcomes in chronic stroke patients: A randomized controlled trial. – NeuroRehabilitation

Abstract

Study investigated the effects of an 8-week rehabilitation exercise program combined with soymilk ingestion immediately after exercise on functional outcomes in chronic stroke patients.

Twenty-two stroke patients were randomly allocated to either the soymilk or the placebo (PLA) group and received identical 8-weeks rehabilitation intervention (3 sessions per week for 120 minutes each session) with corresponding treatment beverages. The physical and functional outcomes were evaluated before, during, and after the intervention. The 8-week rehabilitation program enhanced functional outcomes of participants.

The immediate soymilk ingestion after exercise additionally improved hand grip strength, walking speed over 8 feet, walking performance per unit lean mass, and 6-Minute Walk Test performance compared with PLA after the intervention. However, the improvements in the total score for Short Physical Performance Battery and lean mass did not differ between groups.

This study demonstrated that, compared with rehabilitation alone, the 8-week rehabilitation program combined with immediate soymilk ingestion further improved walking speed, exercise endurance, grip strength, and muscle functionality in chronic stroke patients.
 

via Articles, Books, Reports, & Multimedia: Search REHABDATA | National Rehabilitation Information Center

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[WEB SITE] Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) may help lower limb spasticity after stroke

Adult using TENS machine for lower limb pain

Published on 26 February 2019

doi: 10.3310/signal-000738

Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) delivered alongside standard physical therapies could reduce spasticity in the lower limbs following a stroke.

Spasticity is a muscle control disorder characterised by tight muscles. It is common after stroke and accounts for significant disability. TENS is often used to treat pain and can affect nervous stimulation of the muscles.

The main evidence in this systematic review came from five trials which suggested that TENS combined with other physical therapies has moderate effect on lower limb spasticity compared with placebo.

The review has limitations, with small studies and little evidence on use for upper limbs or comparing with other therapies. However, TENS machines are portable, inexpensive and widely accessible making them an appealing addition to other care.

NICE does not currently recommend the use of TENS in stroke rehabilitation, though guidance covers use of other types of electrical stimulation in certain other contexts.

Why was this study needed?

More than 1.2 million people in the UK are living with the effects of stroke. About two-thirds of stroke survivors leave hospital with residual disability and one quarter experience spasticity.

Electrical stimulation is sometimes used as treatment after a stroke. It includes functional electrical stimulation and neuromuscular electrical stimulation, which both focus on muscle contraction. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) targets the sensory nerves in a different way.

Transcutaneous electrical stimulation has been suggested as an adjunct to other rehabilitation therapy to try and reduce spasticity. The device is portable and can be self-administered at home, so its potential for managing spasticity is appealing.

There have been a number of small studies of TENS with conflicting results. This review aimed to combine the results to see if there was evidence for its use to treat spasticity after stroke.

What did this study do?

This systematic review identified 15 studies (10 randomised controlled trials) reporting the effectiveness of TENS on spasticity after stroke.

Studies compared TENS, used alone or alongside other therapies such as functional exercises, with placebo, no treatment or other treatments. Thirteen studies assessed lower limb spasticity, with 11 targeting the ability to flex the foot. Most assessed use in the chronic rather than acute phase of stroke.

Transcutaneous electrical stimulation regimen varied widely. Intervention periods ranged from one day to 12 weeks, the number of TENS sessions from one to seven per week, and the duration of sessions ranged from less than 20 minutes up to 60 minutes.

Trials were small with maximum participant size 80. The quality of randomised controlled trials was good overall, with lack of participant blinding being the most likely source of bias. Seven trials were pooled in meta-analysis.

What did it find?

  • Transcutaneous electrical stimulation used alongside other physical therapies was moderately effective in reducing spasticity in the lower limbs compared with placebo (standard mean difference [SMD] -0.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.98 to -0.31). This was from meta-analysis of five trials (221 adults) with broadly similar results.
  • Pooled results of two trials (60 adults) also found that TENS alongside other physical therapies was more effective at reducing spasticity than no TENS (SMD -0.83, 95% CI -1.51 to -0.15).
  • Five studies assessed longer-term effects on spasticity. Three studies found the effects were maintained for a period of two to five weeks whilst two studies found the effects lasted for less than a day and that spasticity returned to baseline levels immediately following the intervention.
  • None of the studies reported any adverse effects of TENS.

What does current guidance say on this issue?

The NICE guideline on stroke rehabilitation (2013) does not currently include recommendations for use of TENS. NICE advises against the routine use of electrical stimulation for the hand and arm but suggests a trial of treatment may be considered if there is sign of muscle contraction, and the person cannot move their arm against resistance.

NICE guidance from 2009 advises that there is sufficient evidence that functional electrical stimulation can improve walking in people with drop foot following a stroke, provided the normal arrangements are in place for clinical governance, consent and audit.

What are the implications?

This review suggests that TENS, when delivered alongside other physical therapies, could be considered for lower limb spasticity as part of a stroke rehabilitation programme.

The findings are similar to a 2015 systematic review which found that electrical stimulation gave small but significant improvements in spasticity following stroke. Again this earlier review was limited by small sample sizes, varied treatment regimens and few studies that could be pooled in meta-analysis.

There was insufficient evidence to support use for upper limbs.

Cost was not assessed, but TENS is a non-invasive therapy and devices are widely available and could easily be used at home.

Citation and Funding

Mahmood A, Veluswamy SK, Hombali A, et al. Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on spasticity in adults with stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2018; 16 November. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2018.10.016. [Epub ahead of print].

No funding information was provided for this study.

Bibliography

NICE. Functional electrical stimulation for drop foot of central neurological origin. IPG278. London: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence; 2009.

NICE. Stroke rehabilitation in adults. CG162. London: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence; 2013.

NICE. Spasticity (after stroke) – botulinum toxin type A. ID768. London: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence; in development.

Stein C, Fritsch CG, Robinson C et al. Effects of electrical stimulation in spastic muscles after stroke: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Stroke. 2015;46(8):2197-205.

Stroke Association. State of the nation: stroke statistics. London: Stroke Association; 2018.

 

  1. Analysis of the Faster Knee-Jerk In the Hemiplegic Limb
    TAKAO NAKANISHI et al., JAMA Neurology, 1965
  2. Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation
    WILLIAM BAUER et al., JAMA Otolaryngology Head Neck Surgery, 1986

via Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) may help lower limb spasticity after stroke

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[THESIS] Validating Creativity: Use of the HTC Vive in Post-Stroke Upper Limb Rehabilitation – Abstract

Abstract

Physical therapists often creatively use virtual reality (VR) gaming systems in rehabilitation for patients with neurological deficits. However, therapists need to be aware of what games are applicable to their patient population, as well as how the virtual environment affects patients’ perception of their motion. This study investigated how the game Google Tilt Brush, a 3D painting environment offered on the HTC Vive, could be applied in post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation, and explored limitations of the system through measuring reach distance of healthy subjects. Nine healthy subjects were recruited and asked to perform various reaching and drawing tasks while data on their movement was gathered using a Vicon motion capture system. The data showed that while in simple reaching tasks individual subjects may alter their reach distance by up to 3 cm in the virtual environment, across all subjects there is not a statistically significant change. Moreover, in more complicated drawing tasks, participants could reliably reach to particular points, but most participants missed the exact target by several centimeters. Overall, it seems that the HTC Vive and Google Tilt Brush can be utilized in post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation if therapists monitor patients to ensure they are accomplishing the desired movement.

via Validating Creativity: Use of the HTC Vive in Post-Stroke Upper Limb Rehabilitation

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[Abstract] Effectiveness of the Bobath concept in the treatment of stroke: a systematic review

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Bobath concept in sensorimotor rehabilitation after stroke.

Materials and methods: A systematic literature review was conducted on the Bobath concept from the first publication available to January 2018, consulting PUBMED, CENTRAL, CINAHL and PEDro databases. Fifteen clinical trials were selected in two consecutive screenings. Two independent researchers rated the studies according to the PEDro scale from which a best evidence synthesis was derived to determine the strength of the evidence.

Results: The Bobath concept is not more effective than other approaches used in post-stroke rehabilitation. There is moderate evidence for the superiority of other therapeutic approaches such as forced use of the affected upper limb and constraint-induced movement therapy for motor control of the upper limb.

Conclusions: The Bobath concept is not superior to other approaches for regaining mobility, motor control of the lower limb and gait, balance and activities of daily living of patients after stroke. There is moderate evidence regarding the superior results of other approaches in terms of the motor control and dexterity of the upper limb. Due to the limitations concerning the methodological quality of the studies, further well-designed studies are needed.

  • Implications for rehabilitation
  • The Bobath concept is not superior to other approaches for patients after stroke.
  • The treatments that incorporate overuse of the affected upper limb via intensive treatments with high-repetitions with or without robotic aids present greater effectiveness in the motor control of the upper limb and dexterity.


https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09638288.2019.1590865?fbclid=IwAR1Rjzaw7YeLMsgLiHA7Q3ar9-cN6CS58uSdvFVHpNd1WU_mriL7Q2R1_fU&journalCode=idre20

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[NEWS] Researchers: Physical Therapy-Related Cochrane Reviews Largely Inconclusive

The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews is widely considered the “gold standard” for health care professionals who want to know what current, high-quality research says about the efficacy of various interventions. But when it comes to physical therapy, a “researcher or clinician would not necessarily be able to turn to [Cochrane reviews] for a definitive answer” on a treatment strategy, write authors of an article in the International Journal of Rehabilitation Research (abstract only available for free).

Reviewers for the Cochrane Collaboration—an international network of subject-matter groups that produces evidence-based resources—are known for their systematic analysis of evidence obtained from randomized clinical trials and provide recommendations for specific interventions. Like any systematic review, Cochrane reviews (CRs) are based on the existing research, and randomized controlled trials vary in quality.

For the Rehabilitation Research study, a multidisciplinary group of researchers in Japan turned to physical therapy to find out what CRs had to say about various interventions. They examined 283 CRs to evaluate just how conclusive the evidence is with regard to physical therapy, as well as what factors influence the degree of conclusiveness.

Authors classified a CR as “conclusive” if it identified a particular intervention as “superior to another” or found that interventions are “equivalent.” Inconclusive reviews concluded that “no decision can be made.”

While the authors acknowledge that CRs “often show a lack of strong evidence for the efficacy of a particular treatment or strategy,” they found that an overwhelming majority of reviews related to physical therapy—94.3%—were inconclusive and recommended further study, a rate higher than in many other areas of study. Reviews that evaluated a larger number of trials or included greater total numbers of patients were more likely to list conclusive results; still, even among CRs with conclusive results, 68.8% recommended further study.

According to the authors, many factors were associated with recommendations for further research, including low-quality study design, small sample sizes, too few available studies, and not enough data on participant subgroups or on adverse effects.

“The low proportion of conclusive studies may be attributable to the poor quality of evidence” in physical therapy, the authors write, noting, however, that, unlike other areas of study, blinded randomized controlled trials are “often hard to achieve” in physical therapy research.

Authors emphasized that although inconclusive reviews cannot assist in clinical decision making, “high-quality inconclusive reviews…are of great value” to identify gaps in the literature and areas for further study.

And while there’s much work to be done to increase the number of physical therapy-related CRs with conclusive recommendations, authors think the effort is worthwhile—and timely.

“Trials in physiotherapy are worth conducting, as the field is positioned as a new frontier and is receiving much attention,” they write. “Future research in physiotherapy and further development of the [Cochrane Collaboration] are eagerly awaited.”

Research-related stories featured in PT in Motion News are intended to highlight a topic of interest only and do not constitute an endorsement by APTA. For synthesized research and evidence-based practice information, visit the association’s PTNow website.

via Researchers: Physical Therapy-Related Cochrane Reviews Largely Inconclusive

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[WEB PAGE] Plantar fasciitis stretches: 6 exercises and other home remedies – Videos

Best exercises and remedies for plantar fasciitis

Last reviewed
Foot stretches and exercises can help plantar fasciitis by relieving pain, improving muscle strength, and promoting flexibility in the foot muscles and ligaments.

Overuse, strain, and inflammation on the plantar fascia ligament that connects the heel to the toes cause the foot injury that doctors refer to as plantar fasciitis. The tissue that the condition affects is under the arch of the foot but can cause a stabbing pain in the heel.

Plantar fasciitis usually resolves within 6 to 18 months without treatment. With 6 months of consistent, nonoperative treatment, people with plantar fasciitis will recover 97 percent of the time.

In this article, we look at stretches and exercises for plantar fasciitis relief and recovery and other home remedies that could help.

Plantar fasciitis stretches

Plantar fasciitis may often be an overuse injury. Often, it occurs in runners or people who are overweight or obese. It may also cause tension in surrounding muscles, leading to pain beyond the heel.

A few simple stretches can reduce tension in the foot and calf. This offers both rapid pain relief and a steady improvement of symptoms over time.

People can perform these exercises two or three times every day. They should not be painful.

1. Stretching the calf

Man doing calf muscle and foot stretch against wall

Muscle tightness in the feet and calves can make the pain of plantar fasciitis worse. Loosening the calf muscles can relieve the pain. Try the following stretch:

  • lean your hands against a wall
  • straighten the knee of the affected leg and bend the other knee in front
  • keep both feet flat on the ground
  • there should be a stretching sensation in the heel and calf of the extended leg
  • hold for 10 seconds
  • repeat two to three times

2. Rolling stretch

Placing a round object under the foot and rolling back and forth can help loosen up the foot muscles. People can use a rolling pin, golf ball, or specialized foam roller for this. Sports stores and online stores sell foam foot rollers.

Use the following steps to stretch the foot:

  • sit tall on a chair
  • roll a round object under the arch of the foot
  • roll for 2 minutes

3. Stretching the plantar fascia

To relieve muscle tightness in the plantar fascia, try the following:

  • sitting on a chair, cross the injured heel over the other leg
  • hold the foot in your opposite hand
  • pull the toes toward the shin to create tension in the arch of the foot
  • place the other hand on the bottom of the foot to feel for tension in the plantar fascia
  • use a towel to grasp and stretch the foot if it is difficult to hold otherwise
  • hold for 10 seconds
  • repeat two to three times

4. Foot flexes

Pregnant woman stretching foot and leg with towel or exercise band

Flexing the foot increases blood flow to the area and relieves tension in the calves, which can help with pain. This exercise uses an elastic stretch band, which people can buy from sports stores or online.

Use the following steps:

  • sit on the floor with legs straight
  • wrap the elastic band around your foot, holding the ends in your hands
  • gently point the toes away from the body
  • slowly return to starting position
  • repeat 10 times

5. Towel curls

Curling a hand towel or facecloth with the toes can stretch the foot and calf muscles. Try doing these stretches before walking or doing any other morning tasks. Use the following steps:

  • sit on a chair with both feet flat and a small towel in front of the feet
  • grasp the center of the towel with your toes
  • curl the towel towards you
  • relax the foot and repeat five times
Marble feet exercise

6. Marble pickups

Picking up a marble with the toes will flex and stretch the foot muscles. Use the following steps:

  • sit on a chair with knees bent and feet flat on the floor
  • place 20 marbles and a bowl at your feet
  • pick up one marble at a time by curling your toes, and place the marble into the bowl
  • repeat 20 times

Other home remedies

A number of other home remedies can help reduce the inflammation and pain of plantar fasciitis:

The RICE method

When the pain first appears, keeping off the injured foot can help. First aid for a foot injury can include the RICE method:

  • Rest the painful area for a few days.
  • Ice the area for 20 minutes at a time to relieve inflammation.
  • Compress the area with a soft wrap to reduce swelling.
  • Elevate the area by putting the foot on a few pillows.

Elevating the foot with a pillow can be especially helpful when a person is sleeping.

Anti-inflammatory medication

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), such as ibuprofen, help to reduce both pain and inflammation. People may wish to take this medication as directed on the package or recommended by a doctor.

Some people find that a few weeks of NSAID treatment improves their symptoms.

Shoe inserts

Shoe inserts offer additional support to the arch of the foot. Inserts will limit stress on the plantar fascia and may be especially helpful to people who spend much of the day on their feet. Soft, supportive arch inserts may work as well.

Always speak to a doctor who specializes in foot health, called a podiatrist, for more information.

Massage

Some people find that massage helps with symptoms. Focus on massaging the arch of the foot around the injured area.

If surrounding muscles have become tense because of the pain, massage those too. Some people find relief from massaging the arch of the foot with an ice bottle.

Medical treatments

If stretches, exercises, and home remedies do not help, a doctor may recommend medical treatment. However, surgery is rarely needed.

A doctor may suggest the following:

Risk factors for plantar fasciitis

People who walk or run for exercise may be at risk of plantar fasciitis.

People who walk or run for exercise may be at risk of plantar fasciitis.

A thick mass of tissue called the plantar fascia connects the toes to the heel bone. Inflammation in this tissue, called plantar fasciitis, can cause intense pain in the heel.

The pain may get worse when getting out of bed or when standing after a long period of sitting.

Doctors do not fully understand why some people get this injury and others do not. Some evidence suggests that overuse causes the inflammation.

Risk factors for plantar fasciitis include:

  • spending long periods of time standing
  • walking or running for exercise
  • having tight calf muscles
  • overweight and obesity
  • pes cavus, a condition that causes the arch of the foot to be hollow when standing

Outlook

Plantar fasciitis will usually resolve by itself without treatment. People can speed up recovery and relieve pain with specific foot and calf stretches and exercises.

For some people, plantar fasciitis becomes a chronic condition. Symptoms may improve and then appear again, or the pain may remain consistent for a year or longer. A 2018 study suggests that people who have previously had the injury are more likely to have it again.

Because of the risk of chronic pain, people with plantar fasciitis should see a doctor about their symptoms. There are many different treatment options that may help.

 

via Plantar fasciitis stretches: 6 exercises and other home remedies

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[NEWS] MbientLab Launches its MIOTherapy Physical Therapy Wearable Technology

Unique technology platform uses smart sensors, therapeutic exercises and games to improve rehabilitation and recovery for patients undergoing physical therapy

MIO is a complete, wearable sensor solution that automatically measures, analyzes, and stores a patient's physical therapy data. (Graphic: Business Wire)

MIO is a complete, wearable sensor solution that automatically measures, analyzes, and stores a patient’s physical therapy data. (Graphic: Business Wire)

January 28, 2019 09:00 AM Eastern Standard Time

 

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–MbientLab, a company building the next generation of sensors and tools for the healthcare industry, has announced the availability of its MIOTherapy (MIO) wearable technology for physical and occupational therapists. MIO is the first wearable technology platform that integrates the effectiveness of traditional physical therapy with smart sensors, therapeutic exercises, games, and 3D visualization technology to personalize and improve outpatient rehabilitation and accelerate recovery.

.@mbientLab announces the launch of its @MioTherapy wearable technology for physical and occupational therapists to improve rehabilitation and recovery for patients undergoing #physicaltherapy.

Research shows that most physical therapy patients do not fully adhere to their plans for care because of factors that include lack of social support, self-doubt and perceived barriers to exercise.1 This results in millions of Americans living with preventable mobility issues and pain that reduce their quality of life. This lack of compliance also increases the cost of healthcare for these patients due to a higher number of urgent care and emergency room visits related to their injuries, and in some cases, inpatient post-acute care stays.

Using a unique combination of technology software and sensors, MIO helps physical and occupational therapists improve the experience and outcomes of therapy for their patients. MIO provides consistently accurate measurements that can be used to monitor and personalize treatment, increase patient compliance, reduce recovery time, and reduce healthcare costs.

“I’ve found the MIO based technology to be an invaluable tool in improving post-operative care for my patients where position is critical. It’s clear to me that MIO will be a great platform for doctors and physical therapists to analyze, adjust and customize patient treatment plans using precise measurements captured in real time,” said Frank Brodie, M.D., clinical faculty, University of California San Francisco. “This technology provides data that enables me to have an accurate understanding of my patients’ ongoing progress and adjust accordingly. I look forward to integrating MIO even more into my practice.”

Patients using MIO attach its sensors to any body part using stickers or flexible straps, so that physical therapists can measure, collect, and record all motion from a specific body area, delivering key insights about a patient’s range of motion and measurable progress through their exercise program. The extremely accurate sensors measure, analyze, and store a patient’s physical therapy data in the cloud for easy access and analysis via the MIO App. MIO also offers real-time 3D visualization, providing an exact picture of what the patient is doing at any moment, and can be used in-office or via a telehealth platform with clinical oversight.

“We are excited to offer physical and occupational therapists a wearable technology platform that improves patient and provider engagement, and ultimately supports better results and a quicker recovery time for patients,” said Laura Kassovic, co-founder and CEO of MbientLab. “Serving as their virtual assistant, MIO will help physical therapists rethink how they provide physical therapy and work to heal their patients so they can get back to doing the things they enjoy.”

MIO has undergone extensive sensor testing with more than a dozen third-party users, including physical therapists, researchers, clinics, and university labs. Since 2013, there have been more than 250 papers published on the use of the MbientLab sensors used in MIO. Physicians at the University of California, San Francisco have demonstrated that the MIO sensors can increase patient compliance by 20 percent to 80 percent in post-operative retinal surgery patients.2 Researchers at Duke University also found an average cost-savings of $2,745 per patient undergoing virtual physical therapy with MIO compared to traditional physical therapy.3

MIO is now commercially available in the United States and internationally and can be purchased by physical and occupational therapists, caregivers and researchers at www.miotherapy.com. MIO is available through monthly subscription plans that include the app, sensors, and access to the cloud, as well as unlimited and free customer support via email, and on-site services.

About MIOTherapy

MIOTherapy is the first wearable technology that integrates the effectiveness of traditional physical therapy with therapeutic exercises, games, and smart sensors to improve outpatient rehabilitation and speed up recovery. Visit www.miotherapy.com or follow @miotherapy on Twitter, @miotherapy on Facebook and @miotherapy on Instagram for more information.

About MbientLab

MbientLab is building the next generation of sensors and tools for the healthcare industry including motion capture and analytics, biometrics, kinematics, industrial control, research and product development. Visit www.mbientlab.com for more information.

Picha KJ, Howell DM. A model to increase rehabilitation adherence to home exercise programmes in patients with varying levels of self-efficacy. Musculoskeletal Care, 2018; 16:233-237.

Brodie et al., Novel positioning with real-time feedback for improved postoperative positioning: pilot study in control subjects; May 2017

Duke Clinical Research Institute, VERITAS research study, 2016

Contacts

for MbientLab
Hannah Boxerman
707-326-0870
hannah@healthandcommerce.com

 

via MbientLab Launches its MIOTherapy Physical Therapy Wearable Technology | Business Wire

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[Abstract] The comparative efficacy of theta burst stimulation or functional electrical stimulation when combined with physical therapy after stroke: a randomized controlled trial

via The comparative efficacy of theta burst stimulation or functional electrical stimulation when combined with physical therapy after stroke: a randomized controlled trial – Fayaz Khan, Chaturbhuj Rathore, Mahesh Kate, Josy Joy, George Zachariah, P C Vincent, Ravi Prasad Varma, Kurupath Radhakrishnan, 2019

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[WEB SITE] This Smart Glove Could Be the Future of Physical Therapy

BY  01.10.2019

Rapael Smart Glove (Photo Credit: Neofect)

Recovering after a stroke isn’t easy, but Neofect is here to help patients track their rehabilitation progress with an innovative wearable solution.

At CES 2019, the company exhibited its Rapael Smart Glove, a high-tech rehab device that helps stroke patients improve their hand movements. The device also syncs with an app, where patients can play rehabilitation games and track milestones.

Neofect didn’t disclose a price for the Rapael Smart Glove, but customers can go on the company’s website to buy it. The Rapael Smart Glove is also available for clinics that need stroke rehabilitation equipment.

https://mashable.com/videos/blueprint:yanmAj9rnK/embed/?player=offsite?wmode=transparent

Using the Rapael Smart Glove is very easy: Gently slide on the device, connect to the Rapael App with a smartphone or tablet, and play a variety of rehabilitation games. The app’s fun games include virtual tennis matches and house painting, and they’re available in different levels to balance challenge and motivation. Plus, the Rapael App collects practice data for patients, so they can track their hand recovery progress.

With the Rapael Smart Glove, patients can practice hand exercises and improve dexterity over time. An advantage of the Rapael Smart Glove is that it can help stroke patients who might not have immediate access to hospitals or physical therapy facilities, so they can work on their hand movements without leaving home.

“We aim to help patients all around the world including, but not limited to, those unable to receive appropriate treatment due to economic or geographic reasons,” says Neofect’s website. “By providing rehab training products and services that are available anytime and anywhere, we are committed to improving patient’s rehab experiences and quality of life.”

 

via This Smart Glove Could Be the Future of Physical Therapy – Geek.com

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