Posts Tagged physiotherapy

[Abstract] An interactive and innovative application for hand rehabilitation through virtual reality

Physiotherapy has been very monotonous for patients and they tend to lose interest and motivation in exercising. Introducing games with short term goals in the field of rehabilitation is the best alternative, to maintain patients’ motivation. Our research focuses on gamification of hand rehabilitation exercises to engage patients’ wholly in rehab and to maintain their compliance to repeated exercising, for a speedy recovery from hand injuries (wrist, elbow and fingers). This is achieved by integrating leap motion sensor with unity game development engine. Exercises (as gestures) are recognised and validated by leap motion sensor. Game application for exercises is developed using unity. Gamification alternative has been implemented by very few in the globe and it has been taken as a challenge in our research. We could successfully design and build an engine which would be interactive and real-time, providing platform for rehabilitation. We have tested the same with patients and received positive feedbacks. We have enabled the user to know the score through GUI.

 

via An interactive and innovative application for hand rehabilitation through virtual reality: International Journal of Advanced Intelligence Paradigms: Vol 15, No 3

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[NEWS] Physiotherapy could be done at home using virtual reality — ScienceDaily

Date: February 28, 2020, Source: University of Warwick

Summary: Virtual reality could help physiotherapy patients complete their exercises at home successfully thanks to researchers who managed to combine VR technology with 3D motion capture.

FULL STORY

Virtual reality could help physiotherapy patients complete their exercises at home successfully thanks to researchers at WMG, University of Warwick, who managed to combine VR technology with 3D motion capture.

Currently prescribed physiotherapy often requires patients to complete regular exercises at home. Outside of the clinic, patients rarely receive any guidance other than a leaflet of sketches or static photographs to instruct them how to complete their exercises. This leads to poor adherence, with patients becoming anxious about not getting the exercise right, or simply getting bored by the repetitiveness of the movements.

The advent of consumer virtual reality technology combined with 3D motion capture allows real movements to be accurately translated onto an avatar that can be viewed in a virtual environment. Researchers at the Institute of Digital Healthcare, WMG, University of Warwick are investigating whether this technology can be used to provide guidance to physiotherapy patients, by providing a virtual physiotherapist in the home to demonstrate the prescribed exercises.

Their paper, ‘Timing and correction of stepping movements with a virtual reality avatar’ published today the 28th of February, in the Journal PLOS ONE, has focused on whether people are able to accurately follow the movements of a virtual avatar.

Researchers had to investigate whether people were able to accurately coordinate and follow the movements of an avatar in a virtual environment. They asked participants to step in time with an avatar viewed through a VR headset.

Unknown to the participants, the researchers subtly slowed down or speeded up one of the avatar’s steps, such that the participants would have to correct their own stepping movement to stay in time. The effect this correction had on their step timing and synchronisation with the avatar was measured.

Lead author, Omar Khan from WMG, University of Warwick commented:

“If participants were observed to correct their own stepping to stay in time with the avatar, we knew they were able to accurately follow the movements they were observing.

“We found that participants struggled to keep in time if only visual information was present. However, when we added realistic footstep sounds in addition to the visual information, the more realistic multisensory information allowed participants to accurately follow the avatar.”

Dr Mark Elliott, Principal investigator on the project at WMG, University of Warwick added:

“There is huge potential for consumer VR technologies to be used for both providing guidance to physiotherapy exercises, but also to make the exercises more interesting. This study has focused on the crucial question of how well people can follow a virtual guide.”

Prof. Theo Arvanitis, co-author and Director of the Institute of Digital Healthcare, said:

“Our work and digitally-enabled technological solution can underpin transformative health innovations to impact the field of physiotherapy, and have a direct benefit to patients’ rehabilitation. “We now plan to investigate other types of movements working closely in partnership with physiotherapists, to establish the areas of physiotherapy that will benefit most from this technology.”


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of WarwickNote: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Omar Khan, Imran Ahmed, Joshua Cottingham, Musa Rahhal, Theodoros N. Arvanitis, Mark T. Elliott. Timing and correction of stepping movements with a virtual reality avatarPLOS ONE, 2020; 15 (2): e0229641 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0229641

via Physiotherapy could be done at home using virtual reality — ScienceDaily

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[BLOG POST] Mobile Apps – Physiopedia

Introduction

In the clinic, in education or just for professional development mobile Apps can make a big difference to efficiency and effectiveness in physiotherapy practice. This page is intended to list all the mobile applications that might be of use to physiotherapists and physical therapists. Please feel free to add any mobile applications that you find useful and think others may find useful. Alternatively you can email your ideas to us.

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Physiotherapy Specific

Apple Android Blackberry Windows Price
Physiopedia Link Link Free
Clinical Prediction Rules: A Physical Therapy Reference Link Link Link US$ 39.99
Physical Therapy Content Master Link Link US$ 29.99
Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Link US$ 2.99
Physical Therapy Exam Track Link Free
Physical Therapist Question of the Day Link US$ 9.99
Physical Therapy Spanish Guide by Mavro Link Free
FORCE Connect Link US$ 4.99
FORCE Mobile Link Link Free
FORCE Injury Packs Link Free
VideoXs- Home Exercise Program Link $15.99
PhysioCam Link Link Kr 39.00
Motus Doc Link $19.99
Motus Go Link Free
Mobile Exercise Gallery Link $0.99
My Health Lounge Link Free

Assessment

Apple Android Blackberry Windows Price
CORE – Clinical ORthopedic Exam Link US$ 39.99
Epocrates Link Link Link Free
Quick LabRef Link Free
Goniometer Pro Link Free
Toes2Hip Link $9.99
Functional Vitals Link
ViaTherapy Link Link Free
The Falls Risk Calculator Link Free
Gait Velocity Link Link Free

Outcome Measures/Screening Tools

Apple Android Blackberry Windows Price
STarTBack Low Back Pain Screening Questionnaire Link US $2.99
SLP Scoring Plus
EDSS Calculator
DAS28 Calculator
Patient Centered Feedback
VASQ Clinical
Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Tool Link
Musculoskeletal Flag Screening Tool Link US $1.99
Frailty Tool Link Link
Berg Balance Scale Link Free
Geriatric Link US $3
SPPB Calculator Link Link Link Free
SPPB Test via GeriStrong Link Link US $1.99
Gait Speed Link Link US $0.86
Rehabilitation Measures Database Link

Techniques

Apple Android Blackberry Windows Price
Mobile OMT Lower Extremity Link US$ 29.99
Mobile OMT Upper Extremity Link US$ 29.99
Mobile OMT Spine Link US$ 29.99
PT Video TV Link US$ 2.99
Recognize Feet Link US$ 8.99

Anatomy

Apple Android Blackberry Windows Price
MB Anatomy Link 4.99
Build A Brain Explorer Link 1.99
Anatomy in Motion Link $US 23.99

Journals

Apple Android Blackberry Windows Price
Pediatric Physical Therapy Journal Link Free
Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy Link Free
Bone & Joint Journals Link Free
Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma Link Free
Acta Orthopaedica Journal Link Free
International Journal of Physiotherapy (IJPHY) Link Link Free

Teaching/Educational

Apple Android Blackberry Windows Price
Physiopedia Link Link Free
In Class–organize class notes, share with classmates Link Free
Goodnotes- pdf reader Link Free
Quick Office HD
Pages
Numbers
Powerpoint remote-remote
Splashtop-remote
Doceri-remot
Mindmeister-mindmapping
aVOR Link Free
PhysioU Link Link
NPTE Study Notes by Best PT Podcast Link

Specialty Areas

Apple Android Blackberry Windows Price
iGeriatrics Link US $2.99
FORCE Packs Link Free
NICE Guidelines Link Link Free
Manual Handling Link UK £0.69

Clinic Management

Apple Android Blackberry Windows Price
clinicjot Link US $28.99

Podcasts

Apple Android Blackberry Windows Price
Senior Rehab Project Link Link Link
MDTea Link
PTonICE Link
PT Pintcast Link
The Voice Of The Patient Link
The Physio Matters Podcast Link
The Knowbodies Podcast Link Link Link
RehabCast Link Link
The Pelvic Health Podcast Link
PT TechTalk Link

Client Apps

Apple Android Blackberry Windows Price
MyFitnessPal Link
Clock Yourself Link Link Link $2.99
Squeezy Link Link Link £2.99
Parkinson’s Warrior Link Link Free
Phydeo Link Link Free
Beats Medical Link
The Otago Exercise Program Link Free

NHS Trusted App List

via Mobile Apps – Physiopedia

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[ARTICLE] Feedback Design in Targeted Exercise Digital Biofeedback Systems for Home Rehabilitation: A Scoping Review – Full Text PDF

Digital biofeedback systems (DBSs) are used in physical rehabilitation to improve outcomes by engaging and educating patients and have the potential to support patients while doing targeted exercises during home rehabilitation. The components of feedback (mode, content, frequency and timing) can influence motor learning and engagement in various ways. The feedback design used in DBSs for targeted exercise home rehabilitation, as well as the evidence underpinning the feedback and how it is evaluated, is not clearly known. To explore these concepts, we conducted a scoping review where an electronic search of PUBMED, PEDro and ACM digital libraries was conducted from January 2000 to July 2019. The main inclusion criteria included DBSs for targeted exercises, in a home rehabilitation setting, which have been tested on a clinical population. Nineteen papers were reviewed, detailing thirteen different DBSs. Feedback was mainly visual, concurrent and descriptive, frequently providing knowledge of results. Three systems provided clear rationale for the use of feedback. Four studies conducted specific evaluations of the feedback, and seven studies evaluated feedback in a less detailed or indirect manner. Future studies should describe in detail the feedback design in DBSs and consider a robust evaluation of the feedback element of the intervention to determine its efficacy.

Download Full Text PDF

via Feedback Design in Targeted Exercise Digital Biofeedback Systems for Home Rehabilitation: A Scoping Review – Sensors – X-MOL

 

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[Research] Vagal nerve stimulation may improve post-stroke motor recovery

The Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) may promote reorganization of motor networks via engaging a variety of molecular and neuronal mechanisms through ascending neuromodulatory systems. A recently published review from Frontiers in Neuroscience (N.D. Engineer et al. Targeted Vagus nerve stimulation for rehabilitation after stroke, Front Neurosci. 2019, 29;13:280) has laid out how recent experimental and clinical studies are providing increasing evidence for a beneficial effect of vagus nerve stimulation for the motor recovery after stroke of both, ischemic and hemorrhagic origin. Two multi-site, randomized controlled pilot trials have suggested that when paired with neurorehabilitation, VNS stimulation may generate temporally precise neuromodulatory feedback within the synaptic eligibility trace and may hence, drive synaptic plasticity.

  1. A single-blinded, randomized feasibility study evaluating VNS paired with motor rehabilitation was performed by Dawson et al. (2016) in 20 participants > 6 months after ischemic stroke who had moderate to severe upper limb weakness. Subjects were randomized to VNS paired with rehabilitation (n = 9; implanted) or rehabilitation alone (n = 11; not implanted). VNS was triggered by a physiotherapist pushing a button during task-specific movements. The main outcome measures were a change in upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMAUE) score and response rate – FMA-UE change _6 points was considered clinically meaningful. After 6 weeks of in-clinic rehabilitation, participants in the paired VNS group showed a 9.6-point improvement from baseline while the control group improved by 3 points in the per-protocol analysis (between group difference = 6.5 points, CI: 0.4 to 12.6, p = 0.038). The response rates were 66 and 36.4% in VNS and control groups, respectively. No serious adverse device effects were reported.
  2. The second study was a multicenter, fully blinded and randomized study (Kimberley et al., 2018). All participants were implanted with the VNS device, which allowed the control group to crossover to receive paired VNS therapy after completion of blinded follow-up. This permitted a within subject comparison of gains. To evaluate the lasting effects of VNS stimulation combined with home-based physiotherapy was included as part of the study. Seventeen participants who had moderate to severe upper extremity impairment after stroke were enrolled at four sites. Both groups had 1 month of at-home exercises with no VNS followed by 2 months of home-based therapy. During home therapy, participants in both groups activated the VNS device at the start of each 30-min session via a magnetswipe over the implanted pulse generator to deliver either Active or Paired VNS (0.8 mA) or Control VNS (0 mA), respectively. After 2 months of home-based therapy, thepaired VNS group continued the VNS therapy while the Control Group switched over to receive paired VNS. After 6 weeks of in-clinic therapy, the FMA-UE score increased by 7.6 points for the VNS group and 5.3 points for controls. Three months after the end of in-clinic therapy (post-90), the FMA-UE increased by 9.5 in the paired VNS group and 3.8 points in controls. At post-90, response rate (FMA-UE change _6 points) was 88% in the VNS group and 33% in controls (p = 0.03).

Noteworthy in both studies seemed the greater improvement of the upper limb function when physiotherapy was applied simultaneously with vagal nerve stimulation. VNS likely supported the recovery of upper limb functions via activation of multiple neuromodulatory networks that regulate synaptic plasticity. This may include the noradrenergic, cholinergic, and serotonergic systems (Nichols et al., 2011; Hulsey et al., 2017). These neuromodulators, in turn, act synergistically to alter spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) properties in active networks. The studies above align well with the time scale of the synaptic eligibility trace. VNS may drive temporally precise neuromodulatory release to reinforce ongoing neural activity related to the therapeutic event. An open question is whether similar improvement can be achieved using non-invasive vagal nerve stimulation. To this moment, the identifying and consistently delivering stimulation within a particular range of parameters appears to be of greater challenge with non-invasive VNS than with the implanted VNS device.

Physiotherapy combined with vagal nerve stimulation seems to be a new and promising approach to enhance the functional recovery after stroke.

Key points:

  • Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) may promote reorganization of motor networks
  • Experimental and clinical studies pointed towards a beneficial effect for the motor recovery after stroke
  • VNS may drive temporally precise neuromodulatory release to reinforce ongoing neural activity

References:

Targeted Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Rehabilitation After Stroke. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30983963

 

via Vagal nerve stimulation may improve post-stroke motor recovery

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[ARTICLE] Preliminary Analysis of Perception, Knowledge and Attitude of Home Health Patients Using Tele Rehabilitation in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia – Full Text

ABSTRACT

Telerehabilitation is defined as delivery of rehabilitation services over telecommunication networks and the internet, which comprise of clinical assessment (the patient’s functional abilities in his or her environment) and clinical therapy.This new area  of medical advancement, using state of the art technology is developing at a great speed and is  definitely going to be the next milestone in health care revolution.The objective of this study was to explore the awareness, knowledge and perception of the patients for using telerehabilitation as a medium to provide physiotherapy services as a part of home healthcare services.  A pretest-post test design was used where the home healthcare patients (n = 90) aged between 50 -75 years were asked to express views by given a validated modified TUQ questionnaire followed by an indepth interviewing to develop a key understanding regarding the themes. Interviews were transcribed and a qualitative thematic analysis was conducted. The awareness level regarding the  telerehabilitation changed significantly from 57% to 96% post session(p<0.05). Similarly, the knowledge of the participants regarding  online consultation, followup and online therapy  changed significantly from 50%, 47% and 57% to 96%, 76% and 96% respectively post session of rehabilitation(p<0.05). The perception level regarding the key benefits including  its usage in emergency(83%), convenience of no travel(84%), ease of getting treated at home(97%) and  availability of specialist consultation (84%) were the prime ideas for excellent rating among 95% participants (p<0.05) post session. Findings are helpful to health practitioners in designing their intervention programs across the kingdom. However the actual impact could be only derived from future studies which has to conducted based on different clinical conditions.

Introduction

Telerehabilitation is defined as the provision and delivery of rehabilitation health services at a distance using information and communication technologies and tools (Tan 2005; Russell 2007). Throughout the world, the health care practices is going through major transformation as it is driven through sea change because of the increased use of technology. The kingdom of Saudi Arabia too is witnessing a massive change with significant restructuring of healthcare systems with some major high-end technology driven development solutions. The increased demand is created on account of rapidly increasing saudi population including the growing elderly community, changing disease patterns, global climatic changes and financial inequity (Mahmood 2018).  According to a United nations report the elderly population of Saudi Arabia  those aged 60 and above is projected to increase from 3% in 2010 to 9.5% and 18.4% in 2035 and 2050, respectively (UN Report, 2018).

Similarly, comparing this phenomenon to an average life expectancy of the population in Saudi Arabia, the latest WHO data published in 2018, suggests that Saudi male and female have an average of 73.5 and female 76.5 life years with an average life expectancy of 74.8 years as against an average world life expectancy of 84 years.The increased demand in kingdom also raised because of immense economic pressure with steep fall in global oil prices in 2015-16 affecting the GDP significantly thereby been one of the key stimulus for the government to take timely corrective actions and diversify the economy from heavily oil dependent to develop other verticals for revenue generation (MoH Report, 2018).

Brian child of Crown Prince HH Mohammad Bin Salman, Vision 2030 was adopted in April 2016 and has identified its priorities across all economic sectors and serves as a roadmap for the economic development of the KSA with development of health services been one of the most important key themes. Therefore, as a part of realization of this vision the government strongly supports the partnership of private and public sectors and been seen as a strong indication of the Government’s commitment for making healthcare accessible to its citizens irrespective of the disparities available in the Saudi society (Vision 2030 Report, 2016). Access to healthcare generally relates to people’s ability to use health services when and where they are needed. Determinants of healthcare access are the types and quality of services, including the costs, time, distance (ease of travel) as well as regular interface between service users and healthcare providers. Saudi Arabia is the largest and fastest growing health care market in the region and is estimated to reach $40 billion by 2020 (NTP 2020 Report, 2016).

Moreover, the steep increase in the number of hospitals across all major cities of KSA are run by both government and private organizations which use  corporate business strategies and technology driven specializations, which aim to create demand as well as attract high number patients as the facilities in majority of these hospitals are world class.Among the various strategies listed in the NTP Report 2020, one of the key components of making healthcare accessible across the kingdom is the enhanced use of telemedicine (NTP 2020 Report, 2016). In the last one decade the health services across the kingdom have taken gigantic leap jumps with private healthcare taking lead and using innovations in delivering healthcare. One of such innovations is using Home Healthcare for delivering physiotherapy and other rehabilitation based services for the patients at home (Pulse Report 2018).

Rehabilitation is a very important component in medical care and helps in propelling patient to preinjury level. It is a well known fact that in all long term cases which requires follow-ups such as in surgical cases and other debilitating disorders including Stroke, Cancer, Multiple Sclerosios, rehabilitation is time consuming and financially constraining. To add to this, patients travelling long distances for treatment, it is not only physically challenging but emotionally draining too and especially in case of geriatric patients.Therefore home tele rehabilitation programs, are winding up progressively as an elective method of service delivery. In the western countries, quite a number of research studies has been proved that the Telerehabilitation for the delivery of health services is quite effective, however the scope of using such services in the kingdom is still novice and requires a detailed study, (Hailey et al., 2010, Johansson and Wild 2011, Chang et al 2019     ).

There are scant studies to prove its efficacy in the developing countries as its successful will depends on a number of factors (Clemens et al 2018) . However, among all the variables, the two most important are the technological component and second been its implementation in real terms (Jackson and McClean 2012, Clemens et al 2018). Accordingly, these both are of extreme critical importance from the patient satisfaction point of view. The perceptions of the stakeholders, i.e. the patient and the members of the Rehabilitation team are of utmost importance for its use and wide spread application.The home healthcare services in Saudi Arabia is still in infancy stages with few delivery partners across the kingdom. The usage of telerehabilitation is even more nascent, as the perception of patients in using such a technology for delivering healthcare would be quite critical and important to understand the phenomenon which would be quite useful in framing the guidelines for its applications at a mass level, (Alaboudi et al 2016).

Therefore, this study is an attempt to study the awareness, knowledge and perceptions of  the home healthcare patients in using physiotherapy services delivered via cloud based telerehabilitation. This study, to our knowledge is the first of its kind in the kingdom especially from the perspective of home healthcare patients. It aims to explore the key ideas which might work in favour or against the successful implementation of telerehabilitation used for the home healthcare delivery.

Materials and Methods

The pretest-post test study design was conducted on home healthcare patients so as to obtain an in-depth understanding of the patients’ perception about telerehabilitation services which they will receive as a part of home health services. While a few studies  conducted earlier emphasized about telemedicine to be a key part in delivery of health services, however none of the studies emphasized on perception of patients to implement telerehabilitation as part of home healthcare (Clemens et al 2018, Khalil et al 2018).

Due necessary approval were taken from the ethical clearance committee of the respective organization, which is a reputed home healthcare organization based in Riyadh. In order to recruit participants for the study, sample population were selected from a pool of home healthcare patients who were undergoing treatment under one of the most prominent home healthcare organizations in the kingdom, which incidentally was the only first licensed stand-alone home healthcare services company in Riyadh province.

The study was conducted from Jan 15 to May 30, 2019. In this context, non-probability sampling method was used. Out of 113 home healthcare patients who underwent treatment for different ailments, 90 were randomly selected who also gave their consent to participate in the study out of which 57 were males and 33 were females. Those patients who suffered from orthopedic problems such as Knee pain, low back ache, disc prolapse etc. or underwent orthopedic surgeries such as knee replacement or meniscectomy etc. participated in the study. The study mainly included common geriatric patients for the study who were willing to participate but excluded the pediatric and the critical care, neurological and cardiac patients as they underwent major surgeries such as for stroke or CABG and also were unable to respond directly to answer the questions. The patients who were able respond in English or Arabic were recruited for the study.

Based on literature review and discussion with key stakeholders, a questionnaire and an the interview guide was prepared, modified from Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ) based on key themes of perceived usefulness, ease of use and learnability,  Interaction quality, Reliability and Satisfaction and future use (Langbecker et al 2017) . The questionnaire was converted to Arabic version adapted from the original English version and pilot tested for the home healthcare patients using both forward and backward translation methods and achieved very acceptable score of confirmatory factor analysis of 0.78 using SPSS. It was also pilot tested   for the members of the rehabilitation team. The questionnaires as given in Appendix 1 were responded by the patients and the members of the rehabilitation team followed by a semi structured individual interview from the patient as well as from the team members involved in providing home health services. The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim using Text Analysis Markup System (TAMS) Analyzer as suggested by Yin (Yin 2013).

The Tele-rehabilitation Technological solutions were a part of home health services which were delivered by the company. As a part of cloud based HIPAA compliant network, the telemedicine unit consists of a portal to track health metrics and rehabilitation treatment plan and progress by the PT specialists as well as the Case Managers. The system included case briefing, consultation by specialists as well as providing physiotherapy sessions both by Home health therapists or via health workers such as PTAs within the vicinity of home environment at patient’s ease as schematically represented in Fig. no.1.

Figure 1: Set-up for in-home telerehabilitation: (A) Framework system; (B) dashboard Screen (C) Integrated loop with benefits

The participants were given a pre and post session modified TUQ and asked to reflect on their entire rehabilitation experience using the Telerehabilitation platform so as to get relevant information about telemedicine services including key events such as finding out they would receive services at home by videoconference, having the internet and videoconferencing equipment installed at home and receiving services by videoconference including dealing with technical issues. Following the same detailed interview was taken using the TAMS so as to identify key ideas which can affect usage of telerehabilitation. . Statistical tests was conducted  using SPSS for Pre-post differences evaluation. using paired  t-tests to assess factors associated with awareness, knowledge and perception. Significance was set a priori at p < 0.05. […]

Continue —> Preliminary Analysis of Perception, Knowledge and Attitude of Home Health Patients Using Tele Rehabilitation in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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[WEB PAGE] Pioneering rehabilitation app helps physios track patients’ progress and prescribe exercise videos

Ascenti PhysioNow image

Independent physiotherapy provider Ascenti has launched PhysioNow, a new exercise and rehabilitation app which aims to revolutionise the way musculoskeletal injury is treated by providing patients with physiotherapy services at the touch of a button.

PhysioNow supports users throughout their journey to recovery by providing 24/7 access to expert advice through digital triage, virtual consultations and tailored exercise programmes from approved Ascenti clinicians. Users can book appointments directly through the app and try out exercises in their own home, with access to guided videos that can be downloaded and viewed at any time.

A fully integrated digital care solution, the app will benefit patients by allowing them to track their own progress and compliance with their rehabilitation programme, improve their knowledge and empowerment through education and self-management advice, and increase their confidence knowing they are following the correct exercise prescription.

PhysioNow is fully integrated with Ascenti’s bespoke patient workflow system. This means that physiotherapists can prescribe video exercises, track patient progress and adjust according to real-time patient feedback, all within the same system that supports them in all other aspects of their daily role (from writing treatment notes to accessing clinical dairies).

For patients, this means a digitally enhanced and hassle-free journey, whether their treatment is face-to-face or virtual.

Currently, a third of all musculoskeletal referrals Ascenti receives come from patients suffering with back pain. PhysioNow will enable enhanced clinical outcomes and more cost-effective care, including for common conditions such as back pain.

A beta test version of the app launched earlier this year and has been used by 1,400 patients, with 93 percent of users endorsing the app and saying that they would recommend it to friends and family.

The PhysioNow app is available to all Ascenti patients and will be accessible when they book their first physio appointment.

Additionally, the app will be available to download from the App Store for Apple iOS users and the Play Store for android devices. There will also be a web-based service that people can use at physionow.ascenti.co.uk

Stephanie Dobrikova, CEO at Ascenti, commented: “The launch of PhysioNow makes Ascenti the market leader when it comes to the provision of digitally-enabled physiotherapy and musculoskeletal (MSK) services.

“In today’s healthcare industry we are seeing more and more technological advances that are transforming patient care – improving the experience of clinicians and service users alike.

“Our Digital Health Strategy has placed us at the forefront of these advancements and our mission is to keep bringing the very best digitally enabled services to our patients and partners.”

Ascenti is a provider of physiotherapy and associated services in the UK and is a trusted partner to more than 20 NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups and 400 private businesses across the UK.

The company has over 300 highly trained clinicians delivering upwards of 52,000 treatment sessions every month.

via Pioneering rehabilitation app helps physios track patients’ progress and prescribe exercise videos – AT Today

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[Abstract + References] Virtual Reality Game Development Using Accelerometers for Post-stroke Rehabilitation – Conference paper

Abstract

Stroke can generate several types of sequelae, including motor difficulties in both upper and lower limbs. One way to eliminate or reduce these difficulties is through physical therapy, but this type of treatment can often become tiresome and monotonous, decreasing the patient’s interest. Thus, aiming to assist in the rehabilitation of patients, this work seeks to use immersive virtual reality games with the purpose of interacting with physiotherapy exercises. In this type of game the individual must use special equipment (glasses) to feel in an environment where they can interact in different ways with the scenery. Among the possible equipment used for immersive virtual reality was chosen to use a smartphone in conjunction with a virtual reality glasses. In this way an environment was developed that allows the individual to move through the scenario by the control of the upper virtual members by accelerometry sensors, which will be positioned properly to identify the actual movement of the limbs. Thus, an equipment was developed capable of reading the movements and sending this information to a smartphone that executes the developed game.

References

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    Monteiro, A.: Qualidade de vida (QV) em Indivíduos com Sequelas de Acidente Vascular Cerebral (AVC). Vila Nova de Gaia: Escola Superior de Tecnologias da Saúde do Porto. Vila Nova de Gaia (2011)Google Scholar
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    Lennon, S., Hastings, M.: Key physiotherapy indicators for quality of stroke care. Physiotherapy 82(12):655–664 (1996)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Deutsch, J.E., Mirelman, A.: Virtual Reality-based approaches to enable walking for people poststroke. Topics Stroke Rehabil. 14(6):45–53 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Dores, A.R., et al.: Realidade Virtual na Reabilitação: Por Que Sim e Por Que Não? Uma Revisão Sistemática. Acta Médica Portuguesa, v. 25(6) (2012)Google Scholar
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    Tori, R., Kirner, C., Siscoutto, R.A.: Fundamentos e tecnologia de realidade virtual e aumentada. Editora SBC (2006)Google Scholar
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    Pompeu, J.E., Alonso, T.H., Masson, I.B., et al.: Os efeitos da realidade virtual na reabilitação do acidente vascular encefálico: Uma revisão sistemática. Motricidade 10(4) (2014)Google Scholar
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    Sha, M.A., et al.: EMG biofeedback based VR system for hand rotation and grasping rehabilitation. In: 14th International Conference on Information Visualisation (IV). IEEE, pp. 479–484 (2010)Google Scholar
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    Kang, Y., Park, H., Kim, H. et al.: Upper extremity rehabilitation of stroke: facilitation of corticospinal excitability using virtual mirror paradigm. J. NeuroEng. Rehabil. 9(1):71 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Yasuda, K., Muroi, D., Ohira, M., et al.: Validation of an immersive virtual reality system for training near and far space neglect in individuals with stroke: a pilot study. Topics Stroke Rehabil. 24(7):533–538 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Kang, H.K., Kim, Y., Chung, Y., Hwang, S.: Effects of treadmill training with optic flow on balance and gait in individuals following stroke: randomized controlled trials. Clinic. Rehabil. 26(3):246–255 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Brahler, S.: Analysis of the Android Archtecture. Karlsruher Institut fur Technologie. [S.l.], p. 43 (2010)Google Scholar

via Virtual Reality Game Development Using Accelerometers for Post-stroke Rehabilitation | SpringerLink

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[Letter to the Editor] Societá Italiana de Fisioterapia and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) – Full Text

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of a free resource that can be used by physiotherapists to assist their efforts to undertake evidence-based practice. The resource is the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro; www.pedro.org.au) – a searchable online database that in February 2019 indexes the details of over 42,000 pieces of published evidence about the effects of physiotherapy interventions. PEDro is searched millions of times each year by users worldwide. Societá Italiana de Fisioterapia (SIF; www.sif-fisioterapia.it) has entered into a collaboration with the developers of PEDro. In addition to describing the evidence available on PEDro and who uses it, this paper also summarises the features of PEDro that can facilitate evidence-based physiotherapy. This paper concludes by outlining the collaboration between SIF and PEDro.

Evidence-based physiotherapy

The approach to the clinical care of patients known as “evidence-based practice” is becoming more widely accepted within the physiotherapy profession. The approach was defined by its developers as the “integration of the best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values” [1]. Clinical physiotherapists who want their practice to be evidence-based must therefore identify the best evidence that is available to help inform their decisions about patient management.

It is difficult for physiotherapists to keep abreast of all the research that might be relevant to the types of patients they treat in clinical practice. One contributor to this difficulty is that, with ongoing publications, the number of trials of physiotherapy interventions is growing exponentially [23]. If we consider physiotherapists who graduated in 2011, their university training could only have been based on about half of the evidence that currently exists about the efficacy of physiotherapy interventions. Another issue is that it can be laborious to find the relevant evidence on databases. For example, if a physiotherapist wanted to find evidence about the effects of physiotherapy treatments for knee osteoarthritis, a search of ‘knee osteoarthritis’ on the PubMed database in February 2019 returned over 31,500 articles, many of which have nothing to do with physiotherapy interventions. Searching can be targeted towards more relevant articles but this requires a knowledge of sophisticated search strategies, which involve category searches, Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms, Boolean operators, truncation and quotations [45]. This inefficiency is an important issue because most clinical physiotherapists have limited time to find and read evidence. It would be simpler and more efficient if physiotherapists seeking evidence to guide their clinical practice could use a database that indexed only research publications about the effects of physiotherapy interventions.

Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro)

To address the situation described above, a group of physiotherapists established the Physiotherapy Evidence Database. More commonly referred to as ‘PEDro’, the database is freely available for anyone to use at www.pedro.org.au. This section of the paper will describe the content and features of PEDro, relating these to how they can assist physiotherapists who want to keep abreast of the growing body of evidence about physiotherapy interventions. This section will conclude with a review of how often and how widely PEDro is used

Content of PEDro

Evidence indexed on PEDro

PEDro indexes the bibliographic details and abstracts of three types of documents. One type of document is randomised clinical trials of physiotherapy interventions (or interventions that could become part of physiotherapy care). Another type of document is systematic reviews that include at least one randomised trial of a physiotherapy intervention.1 The third type of document is clinical practice guidelines that are based on a systematic literature search and that contain at least one recommendation relevant to physiotherapy practice. Although there are other forms of evidence (for example, inception cohort studies provide evidence about prognosis), the most unbiased evidence about the effects of interventions comes from the forms of evidence indexed on PEDro: randomised trials, systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines.

In February 2019, PEDro indexed over 33,000 trials, over 8000 systematic reviews, and over 650 clinical practice guidelines. The trials examine interventions from a wide range of subdisciplines, as shown in Fig. 1. This figure illustrates that the subdisciplines musculoskeletalcardiothoracicsneurology and gerontology contribute the greatest share of records to PEDro, although even the subdisciplines with the fewest records have substantial evidence for interested users.

Fig. 1

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[Abstract] Effectiveness of static stretching positioning on post-stroke upper-limb spasticity and mobility: Systematic review with meta-analysis

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To systematically review the effects of static stretching with positioning orthoses or simple positioning combined or not with other therapies on upper-limb spasticity and mobility in adults after stroke.

METHODS:

This meta-analysis was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines and registered at PROSPERO. MEDLINE (Pubmed), Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, Scopus and PEDro databases were searched from inception to January 2018 for articles. Two independent researchers extracted data, assessed the methodological quality and rated the quality of evidence of studies.

RESULTS:

Three studies (57 participants) were included in the spasticity meta-analysis and 7 (210 participants) in the mobility meta-analysis. Static stretching with positioning orthoses reduced wrist-flexor spasticity as compared with no therapy (mean difference [MD]=-1.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.44 to -1.34; I2 79%, P<0.001). No data were available concerning the spasticity of other muscles. Static stretching with simple positioning, combined or not with other therapies, was not better than conventional physiotherapy in preventing loss of mobility of shoulder external rotation (MD=3.50, 95% CI -3.45 to 10.45; I2 54.7%, P=0.32), shoulder flexion (MD=-1.20, 95% CI -8.95 to 6.55; I2 0%, P=0.76) or wrist extension (MD=-0.32, 95% CI -6.98 to 5.75; I238.5%, P=0.92). No data were available concerning the mobility of other joints.

CONCLUSION:

This meta-analysis revealed very low-quality evidence that static stretching with positioning orthoses reduces wrist flexion spasticity after stroke as compared with no therapy. Furthermore, we found low-quality evidence that static stretching by simple positioning is not better than conventional physiotherapy for preventing loss of mobility in the shoulder and wrist. Considering the limited number of studies devoted to this issue in post-stroke survivors, further randomized clinical trials are still needed.

 

via Effectiveness of static stretching positioning on post-stroke upper-limb spasticity and mobility: Systematic review with meta-analysis. – PubMed – NCBI

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