Posts Tagged Quantitative motor assessment

[ARTICLE] Portable Motion-Analysis Device for Upper-Limb Research, Assessment, and Rehabilitation in Non-Laboratory Settings – Full Text

Abstract

This study presents the design and feasibility testing of an interactive portable motion-analysis device for the assessment of upper-limb motor functions in clinical and home settings. The device engages subjects to perform tasks that imitate activities of daily living, e.g. drinking from a cup and moving other complex objects. Sitting at a magnetic table subjects hold a 3D printed cup with an adjustable magnet and move this cup on the table to targets that can be drawn on the table surface. A ball rolling inside the cup can enhance the task challenge by introducing additional dynamics. A single video camera with a portable computer tracks real-time kinematics of the cup and the rolling ball using a custom-developed, color-based computer-vision algorithm. Preliminary verification with marker-based 3D-motion capture demonstrated that the device produces accurate kinematic measurements. Based on the real-time 2D cup coordinates, audio-visual feedback about performance can be delivered to increase motivation. The feasibility of using this device in clinical diagnostics is demonstrated on 2 neurotypical children and also 3 children with upper-extremity impairments in the hospital, where conventional motion-analysis systems are difficult to use. The device meets key needs for clinical practice: 1) a portable solution for quantitative motor assessment for upper-limb movement disorders at non-laboratory clinical settings, 2) a low-cost rehabilitation device that can increase the volume of in-home physical therapy, and 3) the device affords testing and training a variety of motor tasks inspired by daily challenges to enhance self-confidence to participate in day-to-day activities.

SECTION I.

Introduction

An integral part of clinical care for individuals with motor disorders is to assess motor function to guide and evaluate medical treatment, surgical intervention or physical therapy. One of the challenges for assessing motor function is to define sensitive and quantitative measures that can be readily obtained in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to develop a device that affords quantitative assessment of motor impairments in non-laboratory settings. The specific focus is on individuals with upper-limb movement disorders. One central goal was to ground the task in scientific research to relate clinical measures to research and capitalize on insights from fundamental research.

This paper first lays out the need for such a device particularly for children with motor disorders and post-stroke rehabilitation. We then motivate the specific motor task that was originally conceived for basic research on motor control. We then detail the design of the prototype with all hardware and software components so that it can be replicated. One design goal was to make the device low-cost, so that it can be used in many clinical environments including at home for therapeutic exercises. We conclude with first results from pilot experiments acquired both in a traditional laboratory setting and in an Epilepsy Monitoring Unit. These first data were obtained from children with dystonia. However, the device is not limited to this population and is currently further modified for the assessment of stroke patients.

A. Clinical Assessments of Motor Disorders

A motor disorder manifests as an impaired ability to execute a movement with the intended spatial and temporal pattern. This includes abnormal posturing, presence of unintended excessive movement, and normal movements occurring at unintended or inappropriate times [1]. Patients with upper-limb impairments require special assistance to perform common motor tasks associated with self-care, such as feeding and dressing. Challenges in their movement control result in frustration, which leads to less engagement and practice, and thereby fewer opportunities to attenuate their motor disabilities and improve their movement control.

Motor disorder are observed also among children. Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a common cause of movement disorders among children, affecting 3 to 4 individuals per 1000 births in the US. The dyskinetic form of CP occurs in 15% of all cases [2]. Due to inflexible postures, caused by muscle spasms and contractures together with involuntary jerky movements, children with dyskinetic CP are often prevented from participation in many daily activities. This also prevents them from acquiring age-appropriate motor skills during critical periods of skill development [3], [4]. This is particularly aggravated when the condition affects the upper limbs.

For clinical motor assessments, the current standard tools are clinical scales. For cerebral palsy, typical tests are the gross motor function classification system (GMFCS) [5], the manual ability classification system (MACS) [6], the House Scale [7], the Melbourne Assessment [8], the Assisting Hand Assessment [9], the Hypertonia Assessment Tool (HAT) [10], the Barry-Albright Dystonia (BAD) scale [11], and the Shriners Hospital for Children Upper Extremity Evaluation [12]. These outcome measures were devised to satisfy the typical criteria for effective outcome measures, including reliability, validity, specificity, and responsiveness [13]. Although useful, these rating scales rely on subjective assessment and questionnaires that are vulnerable to inter-rater and test-retest reliability, nonlinearity, multi-dimensionality, and ceiling or floor effects [14]. These shortcomings need to be overcome by more quantitative outcome measures to provide a better evaluation of the individual’s motor functions and abilities, and potentially utilize such measures to objectvely assess and titrate interventions.

B. Quantitative Assessment of Motor Function

Motion tracking technologies have provided quantitative means of recording movements through a variety of sensing technology that tracks and stores movement. Camera-based motion capture, such as Vicon (Vicon Motion Systems, Oxford, UK) and Optitrak (Northern Digital Inc, Ontario, CA) requires external markers or sensors placed on key anatomical landmarks to reconstruct the skeletal model of human body parts. These state-of-the-art technologies track motion to very high precision with high sampling rates and they have been used for pre- and post-treatment assessment of upper- or lower-extremity pathologies. However, such data acquisition is limited to traditional laboratory settings because the multi-camera systems are expensive and not portable.

On the other hand, there are low-cost inertial measurement units (IMUs) that directly measure acceleration, rotational change and magnetic orientation. While these sensors have the advantage that they are self-contained and wearable, drawbacks are degraded accuracy due to drift, calibration errors and noise inherent to inertial sensors and the need to frequently recharge batteries for real-time data streaming [15]. Moreover, attaching sensors to body parts can be inconvenient or even impossible for certain clinical populations, and many children will not tolerate them.

In view of the above arguments, there is a strong need for less invasive devices that can provide quantitative measurements in tasks related to upper-extremeity motor function. Preferably, such a device should allow for portability and be low-cost to reach large populations.

C. Low-Cost Rehabilitation at Home

Rehabilitation follows standard practice and frequently requires one-on-one interaction with a therapist for extended periods of time. For these reasons, robotic devices have emerged to deliver higher-dosage and higher-intensity training for patients with movement disorders such as cerebral palsy and stroke [16]–[17][18][19]. However, while effective, robotic therapy is expensive and to date can only be used in clinical settings. To increase the volume in therapy, lower-cost devices that can be used at home are urgently needed.

Performance improvements with predominant home training are indeed possible. This was demonstrated by pediatric constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for children with hemiparetic CP [20], [21]. Further, it was shown that even children with severe dystonia can improve their performance if they use an interface or device that enables and facilitates their severely handicapped movements [22].

A portable low-cost device for home use that is able to provide reliable quantitative measurements would help address the above shortcomings. Measurements could also be streamed to careproviders on a secure cloud protocol, for diagnosis of interventions, analysis of therapeutic outcomes, and further follow up.

D. Theoretically-Grounded Rehabilitation

Motor tasks for home therapy should be engaging to avoid boredom and attrition and should also have functional relevance. With this goal in mind, we developed a motor task that was motivated by the daily self-feeding activity of leading a cup of coffee or a spoon filled with soup to the mouth. The core challenge of actions of this kind is that moving such an object with sloshing liquid presents complex interaction forces: any force applied to the cup also applies a force to the liquid that then acts back on the hand. When such internal dynamics is present, interaction forces become quite complex, and the human performing the task needs to predict and preempt the internal dynamics of the moving liquid. Clearly, better understanding task is like guiding a cup of coffee to one’s mouth or a spoonful of soup has high functional relevance. While many such functional tasks have been developed for rehabiltation (e.g., the box-and-block and the pegboard task), the quantitative assessment should allow for more than descriptive outcome measures such as error or success rate. Monitoring the ‘process’ continuously should provide more detailed insight into coordinative challenges. This is indeed possible in the task of guiding a cup of coffee as we explain next.

In previous research, we abstracted a relevant, yet simplified model task, inspired by guiding a cup of coffee [23]–[24][25][26]. To reduce the complexity and afford theoretical analyses, the “cup of coffee” was simplified to a rigid object with a rolling ball inside. The rolling ball represents the moving liquid; this is also similar to the children’s game of transporting an egg in a spoon [27]. Fig.1A-C shows the transition from the real object to the simplified physical model. Importantly, the original task (Fig.1A) was reduced to a two-dimensional model, where the subject interacts with the object via a robotic manipulandum. The virtual model consists of a cart with a suspended pendulum, a well-known benchmark problem in control theory.

FIGURE 1.Model for the task of carrying a cup of coffee. A: The real object. B: The simplified physical model. C: The equivalent cart-and pendulum model implemented in the virtual task.

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