Posts Tagged RAGT

[ARTICLE] Increased gait variability during robot-assisted walking is accompanied by increased sensorimotor brain activity in healthy people – Full Text

Abstract

Background

Gait disorders are major symptoms of neurological diseases affecting the quality of life. Interventions that restore walking and allow patients to maintain safe and independent mobility are essential. Robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) proved to be a promising treatment for restoring and improving the ability to walk. Due to heterogenuous study designs and fragmentary knowlegde about the neural correlates associated with RAGT and the relation to motor recovery, guidelines for an individually optimized therapy can hardly be derived. To optimize robotic rehabilitation, it is crucial to understand how robotic assistance affect locomotor control and its underlying brain activity. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effects of robotic assistance (RA) during treadmill walking (TW) on cortical activity and the relationship between RA-related changes of cortical activity and biomechanical gait characteristics.

Methods

Twelve healthy, right-handed volunteers (9 females; M = 25 ± 4 years) performed unassisted walking (UAW) and robot-assisted walking (RAW) trials on a treadmill, at 2.8 km/h, in a randomized, within-subject design. Ground reaction forces (GRFs) provided information regarding the individual gait patterns, while brain activity was examined by measuring cerebral hemodynamic changes in brain regions associated with the cortical locomotor network, including the sensorimotor cortex (SMC), premotor cortex (PMC) and supplementary motor area (SMA), using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS).

Results

A statistically significant increase in brain activity was observed in the SMC compared with the PMC and SMA (p < 0.05), and a classical double bump in the vertical GRF was observed during both UAW and RAW throughout the stance phase. However, intraindividual gait variability increased significantly with RA and was correlated with increased brain activity in the SMC (p = 0.05; r = 0.57).

Conclusions

On the one hand, robotic guidance could generate sensory feedback that promotes active participation, leading to increased gait variability and somatosensory brain activity. On the other hand, changes in brain activity and biomechanical gait characteristics may also be due to the sensory feedback of the robot, which disrupts the cortical network of automated walking in healthy individuals. More comprehensive neurophysiological studies both in laboratory and in clinical settings are necessary to investigate the entire brain network associated with RAW.

Background

Safe and independent locomotion represents a fundamental motor function for humans that is essential for self-contained living and good quality of life [1,2,3,4,5]. Locomotion requires the ability to coordinate a number of different muscles acting on different joints [6,7,8], which are guided by cortical and subcortical brain structures within the locomotor network [9]. Structural and functional changes within the locomotor network are often accompanied by gait and balance impairments which are frequently considered to be the most significant concerns in individuals suffering from brain injuries or neurological diseases [51011]. Reduced walking speeds and step lengths [12] as well as non-optimal amount of gait variability [13,14,15] are common symptoms associated with gait impairments that increase the risk of falling [16].

In addition to manual-assisted therapy, robotic neurorehabilitation has often been applied in recent years [1718] because it provides early, intensive, task-specific and multi-sensory training which is thought to be effective for balance and gait recovery [171920]. Depending on the severity of the disease, movements can be completely guided or assisted, tailored to individual needs [17], using either stationary robotic systems or wearable powered exoskeletons.

Previous studies investigated the effectiveness of robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) in patients suffering from stroke [2122], multiple sclerosis [23,24,25,26], Parkinson’s disease [2728], traumatic brain injury [29] or spinal cord injury [30,31,32]. Positive effects of RAGT on walking speed [3334], leg muscle force [23] step length, and gait symmetry [2935] were reported. However, the results of different studies are difficult to summarize due to the lack of consistency in protocols and settings of robotic-assisted treatments (e.g., amount and frequency of training sessions, amount and type of provided robotic support) as well as fragmentary knowledge of the effects on functional brain reorganization, motor recovery and their relation [3637]. Therefore, it is currently a huge challenge to draw guidelines for robotic rehabilitation protocols [2236,37,38]. To design prologned personalized training protocols in robotic rehabilitation to maximize individual treatment effects [37], it is crucial to increase the understanding of changes in locomotor patterns [39] and brain signals [40] underlying RAGT and how they are related [3641].

A series of studies investigated the effects of robotic assistance (RA) on biomechanical gait patterns in healthy people [3942,43,44]. On one side, altered gait patterns were reported during robot-assisted walking (RAW) compared to unassisted walking (UAW), in particular, substantially higher muscle activity in the quadriceps, gluteus and adductor longus leg muscles and lower muscle activity in the gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior ankle muscles [3942] as well as reduced  lower-body joint angles due to the little medial-lateral hip movements [45,46,47]. On the other side, similar muscle activation patterns were observed during RAW compared to UAW [444849], indicating that robotic devices allow physiological muscle activation patterns during gait [48]. However, it is hypothesized that the ability to execute a physiological gait pattern depends on how the training parameters such as body weight support (BWS), guidance force (GF) or kinematic restrictions in the robotic devices are set [444850]. For example, Aurich-Schuler et al. [48] reported that the movements of the trunk and pelvis are more similar to UAW on a treadmill when the pelvis is not fixed during RAW, indicating that differences in musle activity and kinematic gait characteristics between RAW and UAW are due to the reduction in degrees of freedom that user’s experience while walking in the robotic device [45]. In line with this, a clinical concern that is often raised with respect to RAW is the lack of gait variability [454850]. It is assumed that since the robotic systems are often operated with 100% GF, which means that the devices attempt to force a particular gait pattern regardless of the user’s intentions, the user lacks the ability to vary and adapt his gait patterns [45]. Contrary to this, Hidler et al. [45] observed differences in kinematic gait patterns between subsequent steps during RAW, as demonstrated by variability in relative knee and hip movements. Nevertheless, Gizzi et al. [49] showed that the muscular activity during RAW was clearly more stereotyped and similar among individuals compared to UAW. They concluded that RAW provides a therapeutic approach to restore and improve walking that is more repeatable and standardized than approaches based on exercising during UAW [49].

In addition to biomechanical gait changes, insights into brain activity and intervention-related changes in brain activity that relate to gait responses, will contribute to the optimization of therapy interventions [4151]. Whereas the application of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), considered as gold standard for the assessment of activity in cortical and subcortical structures, is restricted due to the vulnerability for movement artifacts and the range of motion in the scanner [52], functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is affordable and easily implementable in a portable system, less susceptible to motion artifacts, thus facilitation a wider range of application with special cohorts (e.g., children, patients) and in everyday environments (e.g., during a therapeutic session of RAW or UAW) [5354]. Although with lower resolution compared to fMRI [55], fNIRS also relies on the principle of neurovascular coupling and allows the indirect evaluation of cortical activation [5657] based on hemodynamic changes which are analogous to the blood-oxygenation-level-dependent responses measured by fMRI [56]. Despite limited depth sensitivity, which restricts the measurement of brain activity to cortical layers, it is a promising tool to investigate the contribution of cortical areas to the neuromotor control of gross motor skills, such as walking [53]. Regarding the cortical correlates of walking, numerous studies identified either increaesed oxygenated hemoglobin (Hboxy) concentration changes in the sensorimotor cortex (SMC) by using fNIRS [5357,58,59] or suppressed alpha and beta power in sensorimotor areas by using electroencephalography (EEG) [60,61,62] demonstrating that motor cortex and corticospinal tract contribute directly to the muscle activity of locomotion [63]. However, brain activity during RAW [366164,65,66,67,68], especially in patients [6970] or by using fNIRS [6869], is rarely studied [71].

Analyzing the effects of RA on brain activity in healthy volunteers, Knaepen et al. [36] reported significantly suppressed alpha and beta rhythms in the right sensory cortex during UAW compared to RAW with 100% GF and 0% BWS. Thus, significantly larger involvement of the SMC during UAW compared to RAW were concluded [36]. In contrast, increases of Hboxy were observed in motor areas during RAW compared UAW, leading to the conclusion that RA facilitated increased cortical activation within locomotor control systems [68]. Furthermore, Simis et al. [69] demonstrated the feasibility of fNIRS to evaluate the real-time activation of the primary motor cortex (M1) in both hemispheres during RAW in patients suffering from spinal cord injury. Two out of three patients exhibited enhanced M1 activation during RAW compared with standing which indicate the enhanced involvement of motor cortical areas in walking with RA [69].

To summarize, previous studies mostly focused the effects of RA on either gait characteristics or brain activity. Combined measurements investigating the effects of RA on both biomechanical and hemodynamic patterns might help for a better understanding of the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying gait and gait disorders as well as the effectiveness of robotic rehabilitation on motor recovery [3771]. Up to now, no consensus exists regarding how robotic devices should be designed, controlled or adjusted (i.e., device settings, such as the level of support) for synergistic interactions with the human body to achieve optimal neurorehabilitation [3772]. Therefore, further research concerning behavioral and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying RAW as well as the modulatory effect of RAGT on neuroplasticy and gait recovery are required giving the fact that such knowledge is of clinical relevance for the development of gait rehabilitation strategies.

Consequently, the central purpose of this study was to investigate both gait characteristics and hemodynamic activity during RAW to identify RAW-related changes in brain activity and their relationship to gait responses. Assuming that sensorimotor areas play a pivotal role within the cortical network of automatic gait [953] and that RA affects gait and brain patterns in young, healthy volunteers [39424568], we hypothesized that RA result in both altered gait and brain activity patterns. Based on previous studies, more stereotypical gait characteristics with less inter- and intraindividual variability are expected during RAW due to 100% GF and the fixed pelvis compared to UAW [4548], wheares brain activity in SMC can be either decreased [36] or increased [68].

Methods

This study was performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. Experimental procedures were performed in accordance with the recommendations of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Psychologie and were approved by the ethical committee of the Medical Association Hessen in Frankfurt (Germany). The participants were informed about all relevant study-related contents and gave their written consent prior to the initiation of the experiment.

Participants

Twelve healthy subjects (9 female, 3 male; aged 25 ± 4 years), without any gait pathologies and free of extremity injuries, were recruited to participate in this study. All participants were right-handed, according to the Edinburg handedness-scale [73], without any neurological or psychological disorders and with normal or corrected-to-normal vision. All participants were requested to disclose pre-existing neurological and psychological conditions, medical conditions, drug intake, and alcohol or caffeine intake during the preceding week.

Experimental equipment

The Lokomat (Hocoma AG, Volketswil, Switzerland) is a robotic gait-orthosis, consisting of a motorized treadmill and a BWS system. Two robotic actuators can guide the knee and hip joints of participants to match pre-programmed gait patterns, which were derived from average joint trajectories of healthy walkers, using a GF ranging from 0 to 100% [7475] (Fig. 1a). Kinematic trajectories can be adjusted to each individual’s size and step preferences [45]. The BWS was adjusted to 30% body weight for each participant, and the control mode was set to provide 100% guidance [64].

figure1

Montage and Setup. a Participant during robot-assisted walking (RAW), with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) montage. b fNIRS montage; S = Sources; D = Detectors c Classification of regions of interest (ROI): supplementary motor area/premotor cortex  (SMA/PMC) and sensorimotor cortex (SMC) 

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[Abstract] Robot-assisted gait training effectively improved lateropulsion in subacute stroke patients: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial

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BACKGROUND: Some stroke patients are known to use nonparetic extremities to push toward the paretic side, a movement known as lateropulsion. Lateropulsion impairs postural balance and interferes with rehabilitation.

AIM: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) on recovery from lateropulsion compared with conventional physical therapy (CPT).

DESIGN: This was a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial.

SETTING: Participants were recruited from a rehabilitation department of a tertiary hospital.

POPULATION: Patients diagnosed with lateropulsion after a stroke.

METHODS: Thirty-six subacute stroke patients with lateropulsion were recruited. RAGT was performed in the experimental group (n=18), and CPT was performed in the control group (n=18). The participants received treatment for 3 weeks, 30 minutes per day, 5 days per week. Outcomes were assessed before the intervention (T0), immediately after the intervention (T1), and 4 weeks after the intervention (T2). The Burke Lateropulsion Scale (BLS) was evaluated as a primary outcome to assess the severity of lateropulsion. The secondary outcome measures were the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (PASS), and Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SSEP).

RESULTS: After intervention, the experimental group showed greater improvement in the BLS score at T1 (experimental group: Δ=-1.9, control group: Δ=-1.1, p=0.032) and T2 (experimental group: Δ=-2.8, control group: Δ=-6.5, p<0.001) than the control group. In addition, the BBS was significantly improved in the experimental group at T1 (experimental group: Δ=+7.1, control group: Δ=+1.9, p<0.001) and T2 (experimental group: Δ=+13.0, control group: Δ=+6.1, p<0.001). There were significant between-group differences in the PASS at T1 (experimental group: Δ=+3.2, control group: Δ=+1.6, p=0.014) and T2 (experimental group: Δ=+8.8, control group: Δ=+4.3, p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: RAGT ameliorated lateropulsion and balance function more effectively than CPT in subacute stroke patients.

via Robot-assisted gait training effectively improved lateropulsion in subacute stroke patients: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial – European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2018 Dec 03 – Minerva Medica – Journals

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[ARTICLE] Systematic Review of Appropriate Robotic Intervention for Gait Function in Subacute Stroke Patients – Full Text

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to critically evaluate the effects of robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) on gait-related function in patients with acute/subacute stroke. We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials published between May 2012 and April 2016. This search included 334 articles (Cochrane, 51 articles; Embase, 175 articles; PubMed, 108 articles). Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 7 studies were selected for this review. We performed a quality evaluation using the PEDro scale. In this review, 3 studies used an exoskeletal robot, and 4 studies used an end-effector robot as interventions. As a result, RAGT was found to be effective in improving walking ability in subacute stroke patients. Significant improvements in gait speed, functional ambulatory category, and Rivermead mobility index were found with RAGT compared with conventional physical therapy . Therefore, aggressive weight support and gait training at an early stage using a robotic device are helpful, and robotic intervention should be applied according to the patient’s functional level and onset time of stroke.

1. Introduction

Stroke is a common disease [1]. In most patients, disabilities remain after stroke, and long-lasting disability requires continuous management and intensive rehabilitation [12]. Furthermore, the economic burden on the patient increases because of the prolonged rehabilitation period. Therefore, the application of intensive and efficient rehabilitation programs and techniques is an urgent need after stroke [3].

Gait impairment is one of the most important problems after stroke and is associated with activities of daily living and mobility issues [4]. Therefore, recovery of gait function is an important goal of rehabilitation for independent living [5]. Interventions to enhance gait function require repetitive task training with high intensity, and extensive effort by physical therapists is essential [5]. Moreover, the most effective rehabilitation intervention, including gait training, must be performed shortly after stroke and in an intensive and task-oriented manner and should include multisensory stimulation [3].

Robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) for patients in the acute/subacute stage who are nonambulatory is effective at reeducating motor control function through repetitive training of a specific task [6]; RAGT provides intensive therapy, which reduces the burden on therapists, and enhances motor reeducation with multisensory stimulation [3]. Several previous studies reported that gait training using robotic devices is effective at enhancing muscular activity patterns [7], muscle tone, joint range of motion [8], gait speed, functional gait capability [79], gait independence, and mobility in the community [1011]. Moreover, patients who received RAGT and conventional physical therapy had a higher chance of regaining independent gait function than those who received only conventional gait training [12]. However, owing to studies that suggested RAGT is ineffective [13], the effect on gait and gait-related function in subacute stroke remains unclear. In a previous review of effectiveness in stroke patients, the RAGT group showed significant improvement in balance and balance-related activity function, but the comparison between the groups was not significant [14]. These results show that RAGT is effective, but whether it is more effective than other gait-related rehabilitation interventions is still unclear. In this context, the effect of RAGT is still not clearly demonstrated, and reviews that have recently demonstrated the effect of RAGT on gait-related outcome measures in patients with acute/subacute stroke are also limited.

Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of RAGT on acute/subacute stroke. The specific goals included identifying the effects of RAGT using assessment tools associated with gait and gait-related function in patients with acute/subacute stroke.[…]

Continue —>  Systematic Review of Appropriate Robotic Intervention for Gait Function in Subacute Stroke Patients

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[ARTICLE] Hemorrhagic versus ischemic stroke: Who can best benefit from blended conventional physiotherapy with robotic-assisted gait therapy? – Full Text

Abstract

Background

Contrary to common belief of clinicians that hemorrhagic stroke survivors have better functional prognoses than ischemic, recent studies show that ischemic survivors could experience similar or even better functional improvements. However, the influence of stroke subtype on gait and posture outcomes following an intervention blending conventional physiotherapy with robotic-assisted gait therapy is missing.

Objective

This study compared gait and posture outcome measures between ambulatory hemorrhagic patients and ischemic patients, who received a similar 4 weeks’ intervention blending a conventional bottom-up physiotherapy approach and an exoskeleton top-down robotic-assisted gait training (RAGT) approach with Lokomat.

Methods

Forty adult hemiparetic stroke inpatient subjects were recruited: 20 hemorrhagic and 20 ischemic, matched by age, gender, side of hemisphere lesion, stroke severity, and locomotor impairments. Functional Ambulation Category, Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke, Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment, 6 Minutes Walk Test, Timed Up and Go and 10-Meter Walk Test were performed before and after a 4-week long intervention. Functional gains were calculated for all tests.

Results

Hemorrhagic and ischemic subjects showed significant improvements in Functional Ambulation Category (P<0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively), Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (P<0.001 and P = 0.003), 6 Minutes Walk Test (P = 0.003 and P = 0.015) and 10-Meter Walk Test (P = 0.001 and P = 0.024). Ischemic patients also showed significant improvements in Timed Up and Go. Significantly greater mean Functional Ambulation Category and Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment gains were observed for hemorrhagic compared to ischemic, with large (dz = 0.81) and medium (dz = 0.66) effect sizes, respectively.

Conclusion

Overall, both groups exhibited quasi similar functional improvements and benefits from the same type, length and frequency of blended conventional physiotherapy and RAGT protocol. The use of intensive treatment plans blending top-down physiotherapy and bottom-up robotic approaches is promising for post-stroke rehabilitation.

Continue —>  Hemorrhagic versus ischemic stroke: Who can best benefit from blended conventional physiotherapy with robotic-assisted gait therapy?

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