Posts Tagged Robotic

[NEWS] Robotic Rehab Aims for the Home Market in Q3

Published on 

MotusNova

Motus Nova is expanding its list of partner hospitals and clinics using its FDA-approved robotic stroke therapy system. It also plans to introduce its system to the consumer market for home use in Q3 2019.

Twenty-five hospitals in the Atlanta area within Emory Healthcare, the Grady Health System, and the Wellstar Health System are now using the Motus Nova rehabilitation therapy system, which is designed to use Artificial Intelligence (AI) to accelerate recovery from neurological injuries such as strokes.

The system features a Hand Mentor and Foot Mentor, which are sleeve-like robots that fit over a stroke survivor’s impaired hand or foot. Equipped with an active-assist air muscle and a suite of sensors and accelerometers, they provide clinically appropriate assistance and resistance while individual’s perform the needed therapeutic exercises.

A touchscreen console provides goal-directed biofeedback through interactive games—which Motus Nova calls “theratainment”—that make the tedious process of neuro rehab engaging and fun.

“It’s a system that has proven to be a valuable partner to stroke therapy professionals, where it complements skilled clinical care by augmenting the repetitive rehabilitation requirements of stroke recovery and freeing the clinician to do more nuanced care and assessment,” says Nick Housley, director of clinical research for Atlanta-based Motus Nova, in a media release.

“And while we continue to fill orders for the system to support therapy in the clinic and hospital, we also are looking to use our system to fill the gap patients often experience in receiving the needed therapy once they go home.”

Clinical studies show that neuroplasticity begins after approximately many 10’s to 100’s of hours of active guided rehab. The healing process can take months or years, and sometimes the individuals might never fully recover. Yet the typical regimen for stroke survivors is only two to three hours of outpatient therapy per week for a period of three to four months.

“These constraints were instituted by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in determining Medicare reimbursement without a full understanding of the appropriate dosing required for stroke recovery, and many private insurers have adopted the policy, as well,” states David Wu, Motus Nova’s CEO.

Motus Nova plans to offer a more practical model, the release continues.

“By making the system available for home use at a reasonable weekly rate as long as the patient needs it, the individual can perform therapy anytime,” Wu adds. “A higher dosage of therapy can be achieved without the inconvenience of scheduling appointments with therapists or traveling to and from a clinic, and without the high cost of going to an outpatient center every time the individual wants to do therapy.”

While the system gathers data about individual performance, AI tailors the regimen to maximize user gains, discover new approaches, minimize side effects and help the stroke survivor realize his or her full potential more quickly.

“By optimizing factors such as frequency, intensity, difficulty, encouragement, and motivation, the AI system builds a personalized medicine plan uniquely tailored to each individual user of the system,” Housley comments.

“Our system is durable, too, proven in clinical trials to deliver an engaging physical therapy experience over thousands of repetitions. We look forward to making it available on a much wider scale in the coming months.”

[Source(s): Motus Nova, PR Newswire]

 

via Robotic Rehab Aims for the Home Market in Q3 – Rehab Managment

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] BIONIK Labs Debuts Its Updated InMotion System at APTA CSM

Word new written in ash, dust, dirt as a irony, oxymoron, parado

BIONIK Laboratories Corp launches its newest generation InMotion ARM/HAND robotic system for clinical rehabilitation of stroke survivors and those with mobility impairments due to neurological conditions.

The new technology, which made its official debut recently at the American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting (APTA CSM) in Washington, DC, includes the following new features, according to the Toronto-based company:

    • Enhanced hand-rehabilitation technology: provides therapy focused on hand opening and grasping for patients ready to retrain reach and grasp functional tasks.
    • InMotion EVAL: assesses hand movements precisely and objectively, allowing clinicians to better measure and quantify patient progress.
    • Improved, comprehensive reporting: improved documentation of patient outcomes, easier use and enhanced interpretation of evaluation results, allowing clearer progress indications over the complete rehabilitation journey, all on one screen.

“The goal of our new generation InMotion ARM/HAND is to enable rehabilitation facilities to enhance their treatment programs for patients recovering from stroke or other neurological injury who are ready to retrain reach and grasp functionality. Along with the improved reporting capabilities, we believe our innovative technology will enable clinicians to improve the patient rehabilitation process and achieve greater recovery for stroke survivors,” says Dr Eric Dusseux, CEO, BIONIK Laboratories, in a media release.

“We’re pleased to unveil the new generation InMotion ARM/HAND at APTA CSM and to showcase its functionality to some of the leading minds in physical therapy,” he adds.

[Source(s): BIONIK Laboratories Corp, Business Wire]

 

via BIONIK Labs Debuts Its Updated InMotion System at APTA CSM – Rehab Managment

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Combining Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation and Upper-Limb Robotic Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients

Introduction And Aims: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a promising approach for enhancing rehabilitation effects in stroke patients, but the invasiveness of this technique reduces its clinical application. Recently, a non-invasive technique for stimulating vagus nerve has been developed. We evaluated safety, feasibility, and efficacy of noninvasive VNS combined with robotic rehabilitation for improving upper limb functionality in chronic stroke.

First page of article

via Combining Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation and Upper-Limb Robotic Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients – Brain Stimulation: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[BOOK Chapter] Application of a Robotic Rehabilitation Training System for Recovery of Severe Plegie Hand Motor Function after a Stroke – Full Text PDF

Abstract

We have developed a rehabilitation training system (UR-System-PARKO: Useful
and Ultimate Rehabilitation System-PARKO) for patients after a stroke to promote
recovery of motor function of the severe plegic hand with hemiplegia. A clinical
test with six patients for the therapeutic effect of the UR-System-PARKO for severe
plegic hand was performed. For all patients, the active ranges of motion (total
active motion) of finger extension improved after training with the UR-SystemPARKO. Moreover, the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) scores of finger extension
increased. Thus, the training reduced the spastic paralysis. These results suggest the
effectiveness of training with the UR-System-PARKO for recovery of motor function as defined by finger extension in the severe plegic hand.

1. Introduction

Stroke is the leading cause of disability in Japan, with more than 1 million people
in Japan living with a disability as a result of stroke. Therefore, interventions that
address the sensorimotor impairments resulting from stroke are important. Motor
function may be restored more than 6 months after a stroke [1, 2], but these studies
included patients with only moderate poststroke hemiplegia, whereas most stroke
survivors have a severely plegic hand with difficulty extending the fingers [3]. This
suggests that a method is needed for treatment of these severely affected cases.
However, although a few studies on rehabilitation therapy for severe plegic hands
have been reported, no marked recovery of ability in extension of the fingers of
the plegic hands was achieved in any study [4, 5]. Proprioceptive neuromuscular
facilitation (PNF) is a therapeutic method that was reported to increase the muscle
strength of the plegic extremities in patients with stroke-induced hemiplegia [6].
However, since PNF is indicated for patients with a certain level of joint motion,
this method has not been used for severe plegic hands where the fingers cannot
extend. Thus, the first author developed a method to build up the extensor digitorum muscle strength using PNF [7, 8] for stroke patients with severe hemiplegia.

With this therapy, he has performed repeated facilitation training using his hands
on stroke patients with a severe plegic hand to help them recover their motor function, and a good treatment outcome was achieved [9, 10] (Figure 1).
Facilitation training uses extension of the elbow joint with resistance applied to
the tips of the fully extended hemiplegic fingers to increase the force of the extensor digitorum muscle. However, this approach is time-consuming for the therapist.
Therefore, development of a training system is required instead of repeated
facilitation training by a therapist. The objectives of this study were to develop
a training system to increase the output of the extensor digitorum muscle force
and to verify the effect of training with the developed system on a severe plegic
hand. The training system is called the UR-System-PARKO (a useful and ultimate
rehabilitation support system for PARKO). The UR-System-PARKO was developed
by remodeling the simplified training system, which developed previously for
resistance training of hemiplegic upper limbs [11]. A brace for securing the plegic
hand to the UR-System-PARKO was developed on the basis of repeated facilitation
training by a therapist.[…]

Download Full Text PDF

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Hong Kong researchers create robotic arm to help stroke patients

new robotic arm  A research team at Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a robotic arm to facilitate self-help and upper-limb mobile rehabilitation for stroke patients after discharge from hospital.

Referred to as a mobile exo-neuro-musculo-skeleton, the robotic arm enables intensive and effective self-help rehabilitation exercise.

The lightweight device is said to be the first of its kind to combine exo-skeleton, soft robot and exo-nerve stimulation technologies. It is intended to cater to the increasing need for outpatient rehabilitation service for stroke patients.

“Referred to as a mobile exo-neuro-musculo-skeleton, the robotic arm enables intensive and effective self-help rehabilitation exercise.”

PolyU Department of Biomedical Engineering researcher Hu Xiaoling said: “We are confident that with our mobile exo-neuro-musculo-skeleton, stroke patients can conduct rehabilitation training anytime and anywhere, turning the training into part of their daily activities.

“We hope such flexible self-help training can well supplement traditional outpatient rehabilitation services, helping stroke patients achieve a much better rehabilitation progress.”

Designed to be flexible and easy-to-use, the robotic arm is compact in size, has fast responses and requires a minimal power supply.

It comprises different components for the wrist/hand, elbow, and fingers that can be worn separately or together for various functional training needs. The device can also be connected to a mobile application, where users can manage their training.

The exo-skeleton and soft robot components of the device offer external mechanical forces guided by voluntary muscle signals in order to facilitate the desired joint movement for the patients.

PolyU improved the rehabilitation by adding its Neuro-muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) technology, which allows the robotic arm to contract user’s muscles when electromyography signals are detected.

When tested in a clinical trial involving ten stroke patients, the robotic arm is reported to have led to better muscle coordination, wrist and finger functions, and lower muscle spasticity following 20 two-hour training sessions.

The researchers plan to collaborate with hospitals and clinics for conducting additional trials.

via Hong Kong researchers create robotic arm to help stroke patients

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] HOMEREHAB – Development of Robotic Technology for Post-Stroke Home Tele-Rehabilitation – The European Coordination Hub for Open Robotics Development

homerehab1

Rehabilitation can help hemiparetic patients to learn new ways of using and moving their weak arms and legs. With immediate therapy it is also possible that people who suffer from hemiparesis may eventually regain movement. However, reductions in healthcare reimbursement place constant demands on rehabilitation specialists to reduce the cost of care and improve productivity. Service providers have responded by shortening the length of patient hospitalisation.

The HOMEREHAB project will develop a new tele-rehabilitation robotic system for delivering therapy to stroke patients at home. It will research on the complex trade-off between robotic design requirements for in home systems and the performance required for optimal rehabilitation therapies, which current commercial systems designed for laboratories and hospitals do not take into account. Additionally, the new home scenario also demands for the smart monitoring of the patient’s physiological state, and the adaptation of the rehabilitation therapy for an optimal service.

 

Contact:

Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche (UMH)
Nicolas M. Garcia-Aracil
Email: Nicolas.garcia@umh.es
Internet: www.umh.es

 

CEIT – Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Técnicas
Iñaki Díaz
Email: idiaz@ceit.es
Internet: www.ceit.es

 

Instead Technologies
Alejandro García Moll
Email: Alejandro.garciam@gouhm.umh.es
Internet: www.gouhm.uhm.es

umh

 

 

ceit

 

capture

via HOMEREHAB – Development of Robotic Technology for Post-Stroke Home Tele-Rehabilitation – The European Coordination Hub for Open Robotics Development

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract + References] Evaluation of an Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Robotic Device for Home Use from Patient Perspective

Abstract

This paper presents a user study to evaluate the system’s performance by measuring objective indicators and subjective perception between the two versions of a planar rehabilitation robotic device: (i) PupArm system, called RoboTherapist 2D system for commercial purpose, designed and developed for clinical settings; and (ii) Homerehab system, developed for home use. Homerehab system is a home rehabilitation robotic platform developed inside the EU HOMEREHAB-Echord++ project framework. Nine patients with different neurological disorders participate in the study. Based on the analysis of subjective assessments of usability and the data acquired objectively by the robotic devices, we can conclude that the performance and user experience with both systems are very similar. This finding will be the base of more extensively studies to demonstrate that home-therapy with HomeRehab could be as efficient as therapy in clinical settings assisted by PupArm robot.

This work has been supported by the European Commission through the project HOMEREHAB: “Development of Robotic Technology for Post-Stroke Home Tele-Rehabilitation – Echord++” (Grant agreement: 601116); by the AURORA project (DPI2015-70415-C2-2-R), which is funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness and by the European Union through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), “A way to build Europe” and by Conselleria d’Educació, Cultura i Esport of Generalitat Valenciana through the grant APOTIP/2017/001.

References

1.
Go, A.S., Mozaffarian, D., Roger, V.L.: Heart disease and stroke statistics–2014 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation 129, e28–e292 (2014)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2.
Langhorne, P., Coupar, F., Pollock, A.: Motor recovery after stroke: a systematic review. Lancet Neurol. 8(8), 741–754 (2009)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3.
Richards, L., Hanson, C., Wellborn, M., Sethi, A.: Driving motor recovery after stroke. Top. Stroke Rehabil. 15(5), 397–411 (2008)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4.
Linder, S.M., Rosenfeldt, A.B., Reiss, A., Buchanan, S., Sahu, K., Bay, C.R., Wolf, S.L., Alberts, J.L.: The home stroke rehabilitation and monitoring system trial: a randomized con-trolled trial. Int. J. Stroke 8(1), 1747–4949 (2013)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5.
Diaz, I., Catalan, J.M., Badesa, F.J., Justo, X., Lledo, L.D., Ugartemendia, A., Gil, J.J., Díez, J., Garca-Aracil, N.: Development of a robotic device for post-stroke home tele-rehabilitation. Adv. Mech. Eng
Google Scholar
6.
Badesa, F.J., Llinares, A., Morales, R., Garcia-Aracil, N., Sabater, J.M., Perez-Vidal, C.: Pneumatic planar rehabilitation robot for post-stroke patients. Biomed. Eng. Appl. Basis Commun. 26(2), 1450025 (2014)
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7.
Brooke, J.: SUS: a quick and dirty usability scale. In: Jordan, P.W., Thomas, B., Weerdmeester, B.A., McClealland, I.L. (eds.) Usability Evaluation in Industry, pp. 189–194. Taylor and Francis, London (1996)
Google Scholar
8.
LLinares, A., Badesa, F.J., Morales, R., Garcia-Aracil, N., Sabater, J., Fernandez, E.: Robotic assessment of the influence of age on upper-limb sensorimotor function. Clin. Interv. Aging 8, 879 (2013).  https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S45900
CrossRefGoogle Scholar

via Evaluation of an Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Robotic Device for Home Use from Patient Perspective | SpringerLink

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Robotic and Sensor Technology for Upper Limb Rehabilitation

Abstract

Robotic and sensor-based neurologic rehabilitation for the upper limb is an established concept for motor learning and is recommended in many national guidelines. The complexity of the human hands and arms and the different activities of daily living are leading to an approach in which robotic and sensor-based devices are used in combination to fulfill the multiple requirements of this intervention.

A multidisciplinary team of the Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi (FDG), an Italian nonprofit foundation, which spans across the entire Italian territory with 28 rehabilitation centers, developed a strategy for the implementation of robotic rehabilitation within the FDG centers. Using an ad hoc form developed by the team, 4 robotic and sensor-based devices were identified among the robotic therapy devices commercially available to treat the upper limb in a more comprehensive way (from the shoulder to the hand). Encouraging results from a pilot study, which compared this robotic approach with a conventional treatment, led to the deployment of the same set of robotic devices in 8 other FDG centers to start a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Efficiency and economic factors are just as important as clinical outcome.

The comparison showed that robotic group therapy costs less than half per session in Germany than standard individual arm therapy with equivalent outcomes. To ensure access to high-quality therapy to the largest possible patient group and lower health care costs, robot-assisted group training is a likely option.

 

via Robotic and Sensor Technology for Upper Limb Rehabilitation – ScienceDirect

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract + References] Robotic and Sensor Technology for Upper Limb Rehabilitation – PM&R

Abstract

Robotic and sensor-based neurologic rehabilitation for the upper limb is an established concept for motor learning and is recommended in many national guidelines. The complexity of the human hands and arms and the different activities of daily living are leading to an approach in which robotic and sensor-based devices are used in combination to fulfill the multiple requirements of this intervention. A multidisciplinary team of the Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi (FDG), an Italian nonprofit foundation, which spans across the entire Italian territory with 28 rehabilitation centers, developed a strategy for the implementation of robotic rehabilitation within the FDG centers. Using an ad hoc form developed by the team, 4 robotic and sensor-based devices were identified among the robotic therapy devices commercially available to treat the upper limb in a more comprehensive way (from the shoulder to the hand). Encouraging results from a pilot study, which compared this robotic approach with a conventional treatment, led to the deployment of the same set of robotic devices in 8 other FDG centers to start a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Efficiency and economic factors are just as important as clinical outcome. The comparison showed that robotic group therapy costs less than half per session in Germany than standard individual arm therapy with equivalent outcomes. To ensure access to high-quality therapy to the largest possible patient group and lower health care costs, robot-assisted group training is a likely option.

 

References

  1. Lo, A.C., Guarino, P.D., Richards, L.G. et al, Robot-assisted therapy for long-term upper-limb impairment after stroke. N Engl J Med2011;365:1749.
  2. Hesse, S., Heß, A., Werner, C.C., Kabbert, N., Buschfort, R. Effect on arm function and cost of robot assisted group therapy in subacute patients with stroke and a moderately to severely affected arm: A randomized controlled trial. Clin Rehabil2014;28:637–647.
  3. Smith BM, Albus JS, Barbera AJ. A Glossary of Terms for Robotics. Prepared for U.S. Air Force Materials Laboratory Integrated Computer Aided Manufacturing Program. U.S. Department of Commerce. National Bureau of Standards. 1981. Available at: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/GOVPUB-C13-7a9025561f229e1f7fb504ace852d602/pdf/GOVPUB-C13-7a9025561f229e1f7fb504ace852d602.pdf. Accessed September 5, 2018..

  4. Feigin, V.L., Forouzanfar, M.H., Krishnamurthi, R. et al, Global and regional burden of stroke during 1990-2010: Findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. Lancet2014;383:245–255.
  5. Mehrholz, J., Pohl, M., Platz, T., Kugler, J., Elsner, B. Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for improving activities of daily living, arm function, and arm muscle strength after stroke.Cochrane Database Syst Rev2015;11:CD006876.
  6. Kolominsky-Rabas, P.L., Heuschmann, P.U., Marschall, D. et al, Lifetime cost of ischemic stroke in Germany: Results and national projections from a population-based stroke registry. The Erlangen Stroke Project. Stroke2006;37:1179–1183.
  7. Ringelstein, E.B., Nabavi, D.G. Der ischämische Schlaganfall: Eine praxisorientierte Darstellung von Pathophysiologie, Diagnostik und Therapie. 1st ed. KohlhammerGermany2007.
  8. Deutscher Verband für Physiotherapie. Aktuelle Arbeitsmarktdaten veröffentlicht—Fachkräftemangel in der Physiotherapie mehr als deutlich. Available at: https://www.physio-deutschland.de/fachkreise/news-bundesweit/einzelansicht/artikel/Aktuelle-Arbeitsmarktdaten-veroeffentlicht-Fachkraeftemangel-in-der-Physiotherapie-mehr-als-deutlich.html. Published March 2017. Accessed April 5, 2018..

  9. Wright, D.L., Shea, C.H. Cognition and motor skill acquisition: Contextual dependencies. in: C.R. Reynolds (Ed.) Cognitive assessment: A multidisciplinary perspectiveSpringer Verlag USBoston, MA1994:89–106.
  10. Masiero, S., Armani, M., Rosati, G. Upper-limb robot-assisted therapy in rehabilitation of acute stroke patients: Focused review and results of new randomized controlled trial. J Rehabil Res Dev2011;48:355–366.
  11. Mehrholz, J., Hädrich, A., Platz, T., Kugler, J., Pohl, M. Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training for improving generic activities of daily living, arm function, and arm muscle strength after stroke. Cochrane Database Syst Rev2012;6:CD006876.
  12. Norouzi-Gheidari, N., Archambault, P.S., Fung, J. Effects of robot-assisted therapy on stroke rehabilitation in upper limbs: Systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature. J Rehabil Res Dev2012;49:479–496.
  13. Masiero, S., Carraro, E., Ferraro, C., Gallina, P., Rossi, A., Rosati, G. Upper limb rehabilitation robotics after stroke: A perspective from the University of Padua, Italy. J Rehabil Med2009;41:981–985.
  14. Wagner, T.H., Lo, A.C., Peduzzi, P. et al, An economic analysis of robot-assisted therapy for long-term upper-limb impairment after stroke. Stroke2011;42:2630–2632.
  15. Masiero, S., Poli, P., Armani, M., Ferlini, G., Rizzello, R., Rosati, G. Robotic upper limb rehabilitation after acute stroke by NeReBot: Evaluation of treatment costs. Biomed Res Int2014;2014:265634.
  16. Aprile I. Multi-segmental robotic and technological upper limb rehabilitation in stroke. Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi Onlus. Clinical trial registration number NCT02879279. Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov..

  17. De Wit, L., Putman, K., Dejaeger, E. et al, Use of time by stroke patients: A comparison of four European rehabilitation centers. Stroke2005;36:1977–1983.
  18. Lee, K.B., Lim, S.H., Kim, K.H. et al, Six-month functional recovery of stroke patients: A multi-time-point study. Int J Rehabil Res2015;38:173–180.
  19. Veerbeek, J.M., van Wegen, E., van Peppen, R. et al, What is the evidence for physical therapy poststroke? A systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS One2014;9 (e87987).

 

via Robotic and Sensor Technology for Upper Limb Rehabilitation – PM&R

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] EEG predicts upper limb motor improvement after robotic rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients

Introduction/Background

Robotic rehabilitation is known to be at least as effective as conventional training for upper limb motor recovery after stroke; nevertheless, which patients could benefit from this treatment is unknown and finding markers that could predict rehabilitation outcome is a challenge.

We aimed at understanding the neural mechanisms of motor function recovery after upper limb robotic rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients using neurophysiological markers obtained by electroencephalography recording (EEG).

Material and method

Fourteen chronic stroke patients (M/F: 11/3; 59.5 ± 13 yrs) with mild to moderate upper limb paresis were subjected to 10 sessions of upper limb rehabilitation with a planar mobile robotic device (MOTORE, Humanware). Fugl–Meyer Assessment Scale (FMAS) and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) were administered before (t0), at the end (t1) and at 1 month follow-up (t2); at the same timing 64-channals EEG was recorded.

We analyzed power spectrum density in different frequency bands of the affected and unaffected hemispheres with 64-ch EEG and their correlation with motor impairment as measured by clinical scales. Correlation analyses were performed to identify the indicators of good rehabilitative outcome.

Results

Clinical assessment indicated a significant functional improvement in upper limb motor function at the end of rehabilitation as assessed with FMAS and WMFT score that is maintained at follow-up. We found a positive correlation between global Alpha activity at t0 and WMFT score variation (t0–t1) and between global Beta activity at t0 and WMFT time variation (t0–t1) and a positive correlation between Beta activity at t0 in the unaffected hemisphere and FMAS variation (t0–t1 and t0–t2).

Conclusion

Robotic rehabilitation improves upper limb motor performance in stroke patients even in the chronic phase. The amount of Alpha and Beta band power at t0 is suggestive of rehabilitation-related motor outcome. Our results suggest that EEG recording preliminarily to robotic rehabilitation could help identifying good responders to treatment thus optimizing results.

 

via EEG predicts upper limb motor improvement after robotic rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients – ScienceDirect

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: