Posts Tagged saebo

[VIDEO] Best Stroke Recovery Hand Exercises – Stage 2 – YouTube

Dr. Scott Thompson is back again to share the best stroke recovery hand exercises that you can do at home. Use these hand exercises and hand therapy tools to advance your stroke recovery. Check out these FREE exercises and blogs on hand recovery for stroke survivors:

https://www.saebo.com/blog/reclaim-yo…

https://www.saebo.com/blog/gaining-fu…

Download your FREE Saebo Exercise Guide here:

https://www.saebo.com/stroke-exercise…

Looking for hand braces and hand therapy equipment to aid with your recovery? Check out these Saebo products:

https://www.saebo.com/shop/saeboglove/

https://www.saebo.com/shop/saebostretch/

https://www.saebo.com/shop/saeboflex/

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Saebo, Inc. is a medical device company primarily engaged in the discovery, development, and commercialization of affordable and novel clinical solutions designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 500,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence.

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[VIDEO] Best Stroke Recovery Hand Exercises – Stage 1 – YouTube

Dr. Scott Thompson shares the best stroke recovery hand exercises. Use these hand exercises and hand therapy tools to advance your stroke recovery.

Check out these FREE exercises and blogs on hand recovery for stroke survivors:

https://www.saebo.com/blog/reclaim-yo…

https://www.saebo.com/blog/gaining-fu…

Looking for hand braces and hand therapy equipment to aid with your recovery? Check out these Saebo products:

https://www.saebo.com/shop/saeboglove/

https://www.saebo.com/shop/saebostretch/

https://www.saebo.com/shop/saeboflex/

Download your FREE Saebo Exercise Guide here:

https://www.saebo.com/stroke-exercise…

SUBSCRIBE AND FOLLOW US!

https://www.facebook.com/saeboinc

https://www.instagram.com/saeboinc/

https://twitter.com/saeboinc

https://www.linkedin.com/company/saeb…

https://www.pinterest.com/saeboforstr…

Saebo, Inc. is a medical device company primarily engaged in the discovery, development, and commercialization of affordable and novel clinical solutions designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 500,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence.

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[VIDEO] Best Stroke Recovery Hand Exercises – Stage 3 – YouTube

Dr. Scott is back again with another installment of Best Stroke Recovery Hand Exercises. This time he’s bringing strength and stability to your hand, finger, and wrist using items from home for exercise.

Check out these FREE exercises and blogs on hand recovery for stroke survivors:

https://www.saebo.com/blog/reclaim-yo… https://www.saebo.com/blog/gaining-fu… https://www.saebo.com/blog/stroke-han…

Download your FREE Saebo Exercise Guide here: https://www.saebo.com/stroke-exercise…

Looking for hand braces and hand therapy equipment to aid with your recovery? Check out these Saebo products:

https://www.saebo.com/shop/saeboglove/ https://www.saebo.com/shop/saebostretch/ https://www.saebo.com/shop/saeboflex/

SUBSCRIBE AND FOLLOW US!

https://www.facebook.com/saeboinc https://www.instagram.com/saeboinc/ https://twitter.com/saeboinc https://www.linkedin.com/company/saeb… https://www.pinterest.com/saeboforstroke

Saebo, Inc. is a medical device company primarily engaged in the discovery, development, and commercialization of affordable and novel clinical solutions designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 500,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence.

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[VIDEO] Mirror Therapy Combined With Electrical Stimulation Using SaeboStim Micro – YouTube

https://www.saebo.com

Saebo, Inc. is a medical device company primarily engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of affordable and novel clinical solutions designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 100,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence.

In 2001, two occupational therapists had one simple, but powerful goal – to provide neurological clients access to transformative and life changing products.

At the time, treatment options for improving arm and hand function were limited. The technology that did exist was expensive and inaccessible for home use. With inadequate therapy options often leading to unfavorable outcomes, health professionals routinely told their clients that they have “reached a plateau” or “no further gains can be made”. The founders believed that it was not the clients who had plateaued, but rather their treatment options had plateaued.

Saebo’s commitment – “No Plateau in Sight” – was inspired by this mentality; and the accessible, revolutionary solutions began.

Saebo’s revolutionary product offering was based on the latest advances in rehabilitation research. From the SaeboFlex which allows clients to incorporate their hand functionally in therapy or at home, to the SaeboMAS, an unweighting device used to assist the arm during daily living tasks and exercise training, “innovation” and “affordability” can now be used in the same sentence.

Over the last ten years, Saebo has grown into a leading global provider of rehabilitative products created through the unrelenting leadership and the strong network of clinicians around the world. As we celebrate our history and helping more than 100,000 clients regain function, we are growing this commitment to affordability and accessibility even further by making our newest, most innovative products more accessible than ever.

via Mirror Therapy Combined With Electrical Stimulation Using SaeboStim Micro – YouTube

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[WEB SITE] Recovering From A Left Side Stroke – Saebo

Have you ever heard someone describe themselves as “right-brained” or “left-brained”? This concept is based on the brain having two hemispheres that perform different, specialized functions. Creative types have a dominant right brain, while analytical people favor the left. It is necessary to understand the functions of both hemispheres when assessing consequences of neurological damage. This knowledge helps anticipate problems that might occur and customize strategies for recovery.

Although the brain is divided into two hemispheres, they work in tandem to absorb information and process details. For instance, visual signals are sent to the right hemisphere first, but the left hemisphere uses context from past experiences to comprehend what the right brain has “seen”.

A left-brain stroke comes with a particular set of symptoms, changes, and challenges. An understanding of these consequences may ease the frustrations of stroke survivors and their families during the recovery process.

What Does The Left Brain Control?

The left hemisphere is responsible for controlling the logic of information processing. Common functions of the left hemisphere include the following:

  • Language
  • Critical thinking and analysis
  • Judgment and reasoning
  • Decision-making
  • Mathematics and sequencing

In a way, the left hemisphere processes information in words and numbers, as opposed to images, as the right hemisphere does. This lends to the common belief that “right-brain thinkers” are often more “creative” types, while left-brain thinkers are more analytical and mathematical.

Possible Effects Of A Left-Brain Stroke

Motor Impairment

On a physical level, the left hemisphere controls the right side of the body, and vice versa. Most physical impairments and paralysis after a stroke stem from issues in the brain, not in the impaired limb itself. Right-sided limbs are likely to suffer complications after a left-brain stroke, possibly resulting in hemiplegia—the paralysis of one side of the body.

Those recovering from a stroke may experience paralysis in certain limbs, and/or less severe symptoms including motor function impairment, muscle weakness, and spasticity. A combination of impairments can make daily life more challenging, both physically and psychologically.

Aphasia

Since the left hemisphere bears most of the responsibility for receiving and deciphering language, a left-brain stroke can often impair both speech production and the interpretation of word-based information. These impairments are collectively known as aphasia, and the consequences for everyday life depend on the type of aphasia experienced.

There are two main types of aphasia:

  1. Receptive aphasia complicates the brain’s reception and interpretation of words from speech or text. An individual with receptive aphasia may experience a range of confusion, from missing a word here or there to needing things repeated several times before they are comprehended. Left-brain stroke survivors may respond best to simpler words and direct, one-on-one conversations. Excessive distractions or multiple people speaking at once may inhibit comprehension. A survivor may find it easier to read short sentences, while complicated sentences and large paragraphs may cause frustration.
  2. Expressive aphasia complicates the spoken or written expression of thoughts. The exact manifestation will vary from person to person. At times, an individual with expressive aphasia may leave words out of long sentences, use words they don’t intend to say, or even use incomprehensible sounds instead of words. Changes in pace and inflection are also indicative of this.

The effects of aphasia become particularly complex when stroke survivors try to express their needs, especially during the initial stages of recovery. Someone may intend to ask for water but end up asking for something else entirely because they cannot find the right words. Depending on where the neurological damage occurred, stroke survivors may experience a combination of both types of aphasia.

Intellectual Impairment

Since analytical tasks default to the left hemisphere, a left-brain stroke may impair the management of common household and daily activities. Paying bills, handling money, or taking care of other analytical tasks may become more difficult. The stroke survivor may become dependent on family or a caretaker to complete important organizational tasks.

Behavioral Changes

It is common for those with left-brain injuries to process information more slowly and therefore move with more caution. Rushing may cause confusion or even injury. The inability to move quickly may lead to frustration and even periods of anger or depression.

Visual Impairment

Vision issues are particularly common in the right eye after a left-brain stroke. Potential problems include drooping of the eyelid and impaired blood flow to the retina. The stroke survivor may experience hemianopia, or blindness in half of the visual field.

Agnosia—the inability to recognize and name items—may also occur for the same reasons that produce aphasia. An injury to brain regions that manage naming and recognition may prevent the survivor from identifying common items, adding a sensation of foreignness and confusion to daily life.

Recovering From A Left-Brain Stroke

Though changes after a left-brain stroke are often abrupt and severe, the brain has an incredible ability to adjust and even reconnect neurological pathways. This ability is called neuroplasticity and occurs before you’re even born. Throughout childhood and adulthood, new pathways form as new information is absorbed by the brain. After an injury, the brain’s neuroplasticity can be sparked to form new neurons and connections through the repetition of targeted rehabilitation exercises. It is only through this constant repetition that the brain rewires and brings to life the lost connections.

Exercises that focus on the right side of the body and reinforce analytical reasoning are the most effective methods to support the regrowth of neurological pathways in the left hemisphere. After all, the body and mind are forever learning. This is true even if portions of the brain are no longer fully functional. Neural functions can adjust and change, for the better, through the support of ongoing rehabilitation.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

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[BLOG POST] How to Treat Spasticity After Stroke – Saebo

How to Treat Spasticity After Stroke-blog

After a stroke, 17 to 38 percent of people experience spasticity. After a spinal cord injury, 40 to 78 percent of people experience it. Individuals with mild spasticity might have muscle tightness and stiffness, and those with severe spasticity can experience painful, uncontrollable spasms in their extremities. A charley horse is nothing in comparison.

What is Spasticity?

Spasticity is a neuromuscular condition usually caused by damage to the portion of the brain or spinal cord that controls voluntary movement. This damage causes a change in the balance of signals between the nervous system and the muscles. It is usually found in individuals affected by stroke, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis.

If left untreated, spasticity can lead to adverse effects such as overactive reflexes, pressure sores, chronic constipation, urinary tract infections, and contracture. Contracture causes the muscles in the hand and wrist to tighten and shrink, which can in turn lead to deformity of the joints and posture.

How is Spasticity Treated?

Fortunately, there are many treatments available to help individuals manage and recover from spasticity. In order to achieve the best results, most people will use a variety of treatments. Your healthcare provider will help determine the right combination of treatments for you. Treatments can vary based on the severity and cause of your spasticity. Below are some of the common treatments for spasticity.

Oral Medications

age, medicine, healthcare and people concept - close up of senior man hands with pills and water glass at home

One way to relax muscles affected by spasticity is taking oral medications that block the neurotransmitters causing the muscles to tighten. These medications are commonly known as muscle relaxers. Baclofen is often prescribed as it acts on the central nervous system, reducing spasms and allowing for greater range of motion. Tizanidine is another common medication for treating spasticity that blocks nerve impulses.

There are drawbacks to using oral medications to treat spasticity. One is that there is no way to target specific muscles. Muscle relaxers will relax all of your muscles regardless of whether they are affected by spasticity or not. Some of these medications also have side effects like drowsiness. The biggest thing to keep in mind is that none of these medications are a cure for spasticity. They work best when combined with stretching and strengthening exercises.

Injections

Medical vials for injection with a syringe isolated on white background.

Rather than taking oral medications that affect every muscle, having injected medications allows the affected muscles to be targeted specifically. The most common injected medication is one you’re probably familiar with: botulinum toxin or Botox. Botox injection is not just a cosmetic procedure to reverse the signs of aging; it is a neurotoxin that blocks the chemical that tells your muscles to start contracting.

By injecting botox into the affected muscles, the risk of spasms and spasticity is reduced. Lessening the spasticity in a patient’s muscles can allow them to participate in physical therapy and complete exercises that will help them recover. Botox can have some side effects, though, such as soreness, rash, trouble swallowing, and weak muscles.

Stretching Exercises

physiotherapy -therapist excercising with patient working on arm stretching

If you are suffering from spasticity, doing stretching exercises is the simplest and most important step you can take to manage it and recover. These exercises are often used in conjunction with other treatments like medication and orthoses, especially if your spasticity is severe and you cannot complete the exercises without additional interventions. For those with mild to moderate spasticity, you may be able to complete stretching exercises unassisted.

When starting an exercise routine, your therapist will teach you passive range-of-motion (PROM) exercises. PROM exercises are called as such because the muscles are moved by an outside force, which can be your own unaffected hand, a machine, or another person. These exercises are effective at treating spasticity as they help prevent stiffness in your joints, work to stretch muscles, and help increase and maintain range of motion. While your therapist will instruct you on which stretches to do and how often, in general, you should move your affected limb through its full range of motion at least three times per day.

Anti-Spasticity Orthoses

Spasticity can be reduced by using special orthotics designed to relieve pressure on the joints, reduce muscle spasms, and provide a prolonged muscle stretch. While static splints were previously used to keep the arm and wrist in a neutral position, studies have shown that static splinting is not effective against spasticity or preventing contracture and may actually cause joint deformity. Instead, dynamic splints like the SaeboStretch allow the fingers to move through flexion caused by involuntary reflexes (like the affected hand curling when you yawn or sneeze) and increased tone and gradually return to the desired resting position, reducing pain and helping to stretch out muscles.

Functional Orthoses

The SaeboGlove is another option for patients with mild spasticity. The SaeboGlove’s mechanical devices incorporate extra features that support specific joints and muscles, decreasing the impact of gravity and making it easier to move stiff or sore joints. Spasticity is less likely when patients rely on these artificial tension systems, which can be adjusted as they regain more strength and mobility. For patients with more severe spasticity, the SaeboFlex provides additional support.

Surgery

Traumatology orthopedic surgery hospital emergency operating room prepared for arthroscopy operation photo of nurse scrubbing doctor putting hands insterile plastic gloves.

In severe cases of spasticity where the tendon has shortened permanently, surgery may be necessary. Surgery is usually saved as a last resort and only considered if the other available treatments have failed and the spasticity is causing significant pain or limiting the patient’s independence and mobility. The most frequently performed surgeries for spasticity are orthopedic procedures. The tendons can be released or lengthened to remove tension, and the muscles can be denervated.

Releasing the Tension

Spasticity can negatively affect your life in many ways by causing chronic and excruciating muscle pain. Luckily, for many people, spasticity is a treatable condition, even if their spasticity is severe. Effective medications, stretches, and specialized devices are a few of the common methods to relieve pain. By working with your doctor, you can find the treatment options that are right for you.

via How to Treat Spasticity After Stroke | Saebo

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[BLOG POST] Causes And Prevention Of Muscle Atrophy After Stroke – Saebo

After a stroke, the body needs time to recover. Neurological damage prevents the brain from properly sending the signals that trigger body movements, resulting in prolonged muscle inactivity. Though a period of rest after a stroke is necessary, too much rest can be a bad thing. If muscles in the body remain stagnant for too long, a condition called muscle atrophy will take effect. In many cases, a stroke survivor will lose neurological connections to an arm, leg, hand, or foot, and this loss accelerates muscle atrophy, making rehabilitation more difficult.

What Is Muscle Atrophy?

Muscle atrophy is the deterioration of muscle tissue due to extended periods of minimal use. In other words, muscles begin to waste away if they are not exercised consistently. For instance, if someone fractures their leg and wears a cast for weeks, they will see a significant difference in the muscle mass of the injured leg when the cast is removed.

This same reality applies to those who suffer from conditions that prevent use of certain body parts. Stroke is just one of several precipitating factors for muscle atrophy.

 

Causes Of Muscle Atrophy

Neurological Diseases

Conditions such as stroke, learned non-use, neuropathy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord infections can diminish the stimulation of the nerves in certain body parts, causing those muscles to be inactive. Ultimately, inactive muscles atrophy. Sadly, atrophy makes the patient more prone to injury, exacerbating their underlying neurological disease and making rehabilitation even more challenging.

Learned Non-Use

An individual experiencing difficulties with an unresponsive limb will naturally compensate by relying on their healthy limb. In the short term, this allows a stroke survivor to complete daily tasks, but over time, the inactive limb will weaken further. This compensative imbalance is called learned non-use because one learns to compensate for and, therefore, underuse the weakened limb. “If you don’t use it, you lose it”– unfortunately, a person does actually lose muscle and neural connections over time if they allow a limb to remain dormant.

Prolonged Illness Or Hospitalization

In addition to neurological complications, any illness or injury that requires a lengthy hospitalization will have a profound effect on the substantive properties of the muscle tissues. A combination of immobility, fatigue, and malnutrition can speed up the process of muscular degeneration and prolongs the recovery time for the underlying health issue.

Poor Nutrition

The body requires specific amounts of nutrients and vitamins to function properly—the adage “you are what you eat” holds real truth and what you put in your body plays a pivotal role in your overall health. This is especially true for your muscle health. A body deprived of nutrient-rich foods—such as vegetables, fruits, and essential proteins—can quickly fall victim to muscle atrophy.

Additionally, those who have a hard time chewing and swallowing food, due to any number of health conditions, are at a higher risk of muscle atrophy. If eating is painful, it is likely an individual will naturally limit the amount and variety of foods they eat. This means less nutrition and, if combined with non-use, will speed up atrophy of the muscles.

Preventing And Combating Atrophy

Given the severe consequences of muscle atrophy, it is best to employ preventative measures if possible. Fortunately, the same strategies that prevent atrophy can also facilitate the recovery of someone who has already suffered extensive muscle loss.

Get Your Body Moving

The best way to keep your muscles from wasting away is to get up and move whenever possible. For those recovering from a stroke or any other debilitating disease, exercise may seem like an uphill battle, but remember that when it comes to rehabilitation, no progress is too small. Prolonged inactivity contributes greatly to muscle atrophy, so even the slightest movements can make a big difference.

Work With Your Therapist

Most survivors of stroke may find it challenging to motivate themselves to move and keep moving, so a therapy or rehabilitation program can be incredibly helpful in the pursuit of a swift recovery. Health care professionals can create a personalized routine to provide you with consistency while offering positive reinforcement when facing challenging obstacles.

Electrical Stimulation

Electrical stimulation is a great therapeutic option for many stroke survivors. Different forms of electrotherapy can be deployed to address pain and weakness in affected areas, along with additional targeted benefits, including but not limited to increased circulation and decreased spasticity and pain. Tools like Saebo AvivaStim trigger muscles to relax and contract according to a comprehensive range of programs, aiding in muscle re-education and strengthening. The SaeboStim Micro is an electromesh garment that delivers electrical stimulation to an affected arm and hand, addressing spasticity, weakness, pain, edema and limited function. 

Active Exercises

Active exercises are exercises that require muscle exertion or body movement and are necessary for stroke rehabilitation, especially if muscle atrophy is a concern. Tools like the SaeboGlide can help strengthen the shoulder and elbow. As can be seen in this video, even if a survivor has lost hand function, the SaeboGlide comes with a strap to secure the hand to the sleeve allowing them to actively participate in exercisesIn addition to the improved physical fitness from a regular exercise regimen, there is scientific reason to believe stroke survivors who exercise enjoy cognitive and psychological benefits as well. Learn more about active exercises here.

Don’t Forget To Stretch!

Passive exercises are called as such because the muscles are moved by an outside force: either a machine, another body part, or another person. Also known as range-of-motion, or ROM exercises, passive exercises help prevent stiffness in your joints, work to stretch muscles, and can help increase and maintain range-of-motion. Learn more about passive exercises here.

You Can Combat Muscle Atrophy

Just as a tree is barren in the winter only to regenerate come the spring, muscles in the body can regain strength after they atrophy. If you or a loved one is currently dealing with muscle atrophy, or if feelings of frustration persist during the rehabilitation process, trust that recovery is possible with the right treatment plan and the support of family, friends, and healthcare professionals.

Also, remember that the body heals at its own pace. If a person remains patient in their practice and steadfast in their efforts, they will surely regain strength over time.


All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

via Causes And Prevention Of Muscle Atrophy After Stroke | Saebo

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[BLOG POST] At Home Leg Exercises For Stroke Recovery Patients – Saebo

Reclaim Mobility With Leg Exercises For Stroke Recovery

Stroke recovery can be a long process. Managing the ongoing need to rebuild bodily control and strength after neurological damage is no easy task. Each year nearly 800,000 people in the United States alone will suffer from a stroke, leaving them with ongoing physical and neurological damage.

If you have suffered from a stroke, loss of balance and control can make standing and walking difficult. While outpatient stroke recovery therapy is vital to improving this problem, you can also continue improving after returning home with the help of these leg exercises for stroke recovery.

Leg Exercises for Stroke Recovery

Richard Sealy, director of The Rehab Practice, a private neuro-therapy rehabilitation program in the United Kingdom, regularly works with individuals, families, and caregivers to establish custom exercise routines to aid in recovery from from long-term neurological problems, like the damage caused by stroke. While he acknowledges that each patient should have a custom exercise routine specific and personal to their struggles, he recommends a series of exercises to help strengthen the legs and improve range of motion during stroke recovery.

Sealy understands the importance of fast progress after a stroke, and including ongoing at-home exercises can improve health and well-being. These low-impact strength and stretching leg exercises for stroke recovery are a good complement to use in conjunction with the Saebo MyoTrac Infiniti biofeedback system.

As with any exercise program, please consult your healthcare provider before you begin. If you notice increased pain, discomfort, or other troubling systems, stop these exercises immediately and talk to your doctor.

Exercise #1 – Standing and Balance

Balance and coordination are often lost after a stroke. This can make simple actions, like standing and walking,
difficult. In addition, weakness can occur around the muscles on the exterior of the hip area.

Exercises for standing and balance are vital to helping you regain your quality of life after a stroke. When performing these exercises, always hold onto a table or similar stable surface to avoid a fall.

 

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Basic Level Standing and Balance Exercise

Hold on to a stable surface, standing straight and tall while you transfer your weight to one side. Swing the other leg to the side. Use your balance to hold this position for 10 seconds. Slowly lower your leg back down. Repeat a few times, as long as you have the strength, and then switch legs.

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Intermediate Standing and Balance Exercises

Once you have mastered the first exercise, move on to the intermediate level. Again, hold on to a stable surface, keeping your back tall and straight. Transfer your weight to one leg, and bring the other leg up in front of you, bending the knee. Hold this position for a count of 10, and slowly lower it back down. Repeat, then switch legs.

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Advanced Standing and Balance Exercises

Finally, progress to the advanced level. This time, stand straight and tall and transfer your weight to one leg. Swing the other leg out behind you as far as you can. Hold for 10 seconds, if you can, and lower it back down slowly. Repeat and switch legs.

This progression of exercises will strengthen the hip muscle and improve balance, so you can regain normal use of your legs. This exercise series pairs well with the Saebo MayoTrac Infiniti biofeedback triggered stimulation system.

 

Exercise #2 – Bridging

Often after a stroke, the hips and the core muscle groups, which are crucial to standing and walking, become weak. Bridging exercises help to strengthen these core muscles. Like the standing and balance exercises, bridging exercises move through a progression to help rebuild your strength and coordination.

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Basic Bridging Exercise

The basic bridging exercise, called “Inner Range Quad Movement”, builds strength in the thigh muscles. To perform this exercise, lay down and place a pillow or rolled towel under the knee joint. Then, press the back of the knee into the pillow or rolled towel to lift your heel off the floor.

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Intermediate Bridging Exercise

“Ski Squats” take bridging exercises to the next level. For this exercise, lean against a flat wall, placing your feet in front of you. Using the wall to support your weight and your back, slowly bend your knees to lower yourself down. Hold this position for 10 seconds, if you can. Slide back up, supporting your weight on the wall, until you are in a standing position.

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Advanced Bridging Exercise

To take bridging exercises to the advanced level, repeat the “Ski Squat”, but place a gym ball between yourself and the wall when you bend your knees into the squat position.

 

Exercise #3 – Clams

If the lower legs are affected after a stroke, Clams can provide strengthening and improved range of motion. Clams focuses on building strength and coordination in the lower leg, increasing range of motion and control.

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Basic Clams Exercise – In Sitting

Before starting Clams, you must stretch the calf muscle and build coordination in the lower body. In Sitting helps with this. In a sitting position, create a stirrup around one foot using a towel or belt, placing the stirrup around the ball of the foot. Gently pull the stirrup up towards your body to stretch the calf muscle. Then, pull it with the outer hand to turn the foot out, continuing to stretch the muscle.

image02

Intermediate Clams Exercise

Once you have build some flexibility, you are ready for the Clams exercise. Lay down on your side, and bend your knees, resting one on top of the other. Then, while you keep your feet together, lift the upper knee away from the other knee, holding them apart for a count of 10 seconds. Slowly lower your knee back down. While performing this exercise, make sure that you do not roll your hips back.

image05

Advanced Clams Exercise

After mastering Clams, take it to the next level by lifting the knee and the foot of the upper leg. Again, hold the position for a count of 10 seconds. Lower it back down. Repeat a few times to build strength and range of motion.

Rebuild Strength and Coordination with Stroke Recovery Exercises

Strokes can occur in people of any age, although nearly 75% of all strokes occur after the age of 65, and an individual’s risk doubles after 55. Each year, approximately 600,000 people suffer from their first stroke, and an additional 185,000 have a recurrent stroke.

If you have suffered one or more strokes, it can be easy to feel discouraged at the lack of mobility and control you experience. Stroke exercises, like these, can help you regain that control and build up your strength again, so you can recover from the neurological damage of a stroke.

For extra support in advancing your recovery after a stroke, check out the many advanced products from Saebo to help you every step of the way.

Which Product is Right for Me?

via At Home Leg Exercises For Stroke Recovery Patients

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[VIDEO] Henry Hoffman Q&A Video Series: Why SaeboStim Micro? – YouTube

Published on Oct 16, 2017

Saebo, Inc. is a medical device company primarily engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of affordable and novel clinical solutions designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 100,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence.
In 2001, two occupational therapists had one simple, but powerful goal – to provide neurological clients access to transformative and life changing products.
At the time, treatment options for improving arm and hand function were limited. The technology that did exist was expensive and inaccessible for home use. With inadequate therapy options often leading to unfavorable outcomes, health professionals routinely told their clients that they have “reached a plateau” or “no further gains can be made”. The founders believed that it was not the clients who had plateaued, but rather their treatment options had plateaued.
Saebo’s commitment – “No Plateau in Sight” – was inspired by this mentality; and the accessible, revolutionary solutions began.
Saebo’s revolutionary product offering was based on the latest advances in rehabilitation research. From the SaeboFlex which allows clients to incorporate their hand functionally in therapy or at home, to the SaeboMAS, an unweighting device used to assist the arm during daily living tasks and exercise training, “innovation” and “affordability” can now be used in the same sentence.
Over the last ten years, Saebo has grown into a leading global provider of rehabilitative products created through the unrelenting leadership and the strong network of clinicians around the world. As we celebrate our history and helping more than 100,000 clients regain function, we are growing this commitment to affordability and accessibility even further by making our newest, most innovative products more accessible than ever.

 

via Henry Hoffman Q&A Video Series: Why SaeboStim Micro? – YouTube

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[BLOG POST] Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy After Stroke – Saebo

Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy After Stroke-blog

 

When a stroke causes a person to lose the use of one of their limbs, they can easily get frustrated, stop trying to use it at all, and start relying solely on the unaffected limb. This is called learned non-use; it means that the stroke survivor has learned to stop using an affected limb because of its lack of response.

Learned non-use makes it even more difficult for the patient to recover movement and function. This is why many physical therapists and occupational therapists use a technique called constraint-induced movement therapy (or CIMT) to help their patients recover as much movement and function as possible in affected limbs.

 

What is Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT)?

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CIMT is practiced most widely with hands and fingers. It consists of placing a mitt over the patient’s functional hand and forcing them to use the stroke-affected limb for several hours a day. The patient performs a repetitive movement so that the brain can repair the pathways.

This therapy technique uses two parts and is done for two weeks. The first part is to restrain the non-affected limb for 90 percent of the patient’s waking time. The second part is to get the patient to practice a specific movement for six hours a day, using shaping. Shaping, also known as adaptive task practice or ATP, is a method of training that involves breaking down tasks into manageable components and changing one parameter of the task at a time. Shaping improves motor relearning and problem-solving. This intensive program is meant to support the brain in making new pathways for movement in the affected limb.

CIMT is useful for both patients with chronic hemiparesis and those recovering from acute stroke. It helps patients of the chronic hemiparesis group overcome learned non-use. For patients recovering from acute stroke, CIMT contributes to preventing learned non-use in the first place. In both cases, CIMT is an effective tool in neurorehabilitation.

There is a somewhat less-intense version of CIMT, called modified CIMT (or mCIMT). It involves the exact same activities, i.e. restraint of the unaffected limb and practice of repetitive movements in the affected limb, but without the 90 percent of waking time and six-hours-per-day schedule of regular CIMT. However, the therapeutic factors remain the same: restraint of the unaffected limb and movement practice in the affected limb are what help with learned non-use and movement recovery.

 

How CIMT Works

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Several neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies have shown that CIMT can stimulate the brain into quickly reorganizing itself, especially in the areas of the cortex that control the affected limb. In other words, CIMT changes the brain so the patient can recover use of the affected limb.

Randomized controlled trials of CIMT have shown that in patients with some active wrist and hand movement, constraint-induced movement therapy had a positive impact on movement and function.

Specifically, the EXCITE trial, held between 2001 and 2003 at several universities, showed that CIMT helped patients with mild to moderate limb impairment learn to increase their use of the affected limb, effectively fighting learned non-use. The positive results lasted for as long as two years.

 

Saebo and CIMT

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Several Saebo items can help with CIMT. The first is the SaeboGlove used for patients with difficulty opening the hands, weak hands and/or mild spasticity. For patients that have more than mild spasticity, the SaeboFlex is indicated. If the patient needs assistance with opening and closing fingers during CIMT therapy, both devices provide support via a spring or tensioner system which imitates the releasing motion once a person tries to let go of an object.

The SaeboMAS and SaeboMAS mini can also be used for CIMT. In the MAS the patient’s arm is unweighted, reducing tone in the hand allowing for more distal control. When the shoulder exerts itself, tone in the hand increases due to more effort taking place by the patient.

If the patient’s fingers are generally clenched into a fist but can be stretched open passively, using the SaeboStretch glove prior to CIMT will help the patient recover some range of motion. Depending on the severity of the case, many clients can reduce the tightness in the hand usually within several weeks to several months.

A Saebo-trained physical or occupational therapist uses Saebo therapy in conjunction with CIMT to promote stroke recovery, effectively fighting learned non-use and supporting neurorehabilitation.

Patients with mild to moderate impairment can benefit a lot from Saebo therapy and CIMT. The Saebo orthoses support the patient in gaining strength and range of motion, while CIMT fights learned non-use and promotes changes in the brain that lead to movement and function recovery in affected limbs.


All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

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