Posts Tagged saebo

[BLOG POST] Tired After a Stroke? Understanding Post-Stroke Fatigue | Saebo

Feeling tired is a normal part of life. Whether you didn’t get a good night of sleep or wore yourself out with a busy day or an exerting activity, your body can only handle so much before you start to feel the physical effects of being tired. In cases like these, all you need to do is rest in order to feel re-charged and rejuvenated. But for individuals who have suffered from a stroke, it’s not that easy.

Fatigue after a stroke is common, and it’s different from simply feeling tired. Post-stroke fatigue can make somebody feel like they completely lack energy or strength, with a persistent feeling of being tired or weary. Unlike typical tiredness, a nap or sleeping longer at night won’t solve things. If you are experiencing post-stroke fatigue, it is important to consult with your doctor so you can take the proper steps to start feeling better and more energized.

 

What is Post-Stroke Fatigue?

Post-stroke fatigue can occur after a mild or severe stroke, and roughly 40 to 70 percent of stroke patients experience this “invisible symptom.” It’s a particularly frustrating side effect of a stroke because it can make you feel completely exhausted and off your game, which in turn makes recovering from the stroke seem even more difficult.

Those who experience post-stroke fatigue can feel like they are not in control of their recovery, as it’s hard for them to muster the energy to participate in their rehab activities or normal day-to-day functions. Many individuals with post-stroke fatigue initially confuse it with “being tired,” but post-stroke fatigue is not the same thing as just being tired. It can come out of nowhere, without warning, and rest isn’t always the solution.

Post-stroke fatigue is draining both physically and emotionally/mentally, and the severity of the stroke does not seem to correlate to the severity of the fatigue. Even a mild stroke can result in extreme post-stroke fatigue, and even if you suffered a stroke some time ago and feel as if you’ve made a full recovery, post-stroke fatigue can still impact you.

 

What Causes Post-Stroke Fatigue?

 

Experts aren’t entirely sure what causes post-stroke fatigue because there has been limited research on the subject.Medical conditions like diabetes and heart disease can play a role, as can any pre-existing fatigue issues an individual had before suffering from a stroke. In addition to fatigue, sleep apnea is another issue reported by stroke survivors, so it’s possible there is some sort of link between the two, though nothing has been proven.

Survivors often feel stressed or depressed about the stroke afterwards, from worrying about the recovery process to being concerned with their symptoms. Stress and the mental demands that come with it can lead to fatigue. There are a lot of unknowns about the cause of post-stress fatigue, but one thing is certain: a stroke takes a big toll on a person’s body, and many stroke survivors feel severe fatigue as a result.

 

How Do You Tell if You Have Post-Stroke Fatigue?

Remember that there’s a difference between feeling tired and having post-stroke fatigue. The latter will give you afeeling of complete exhaustion; you will lack all energy and feel extremely weary. You will probably feel like you have to rest every day, or even multiple times a day. This can make it difficult to accomplish things, whether it’s something as simple as spending time with family, running errands, or even attending your post-stroke therapy sessions.

Until you feel the type of exhaustion that comes with post-stroke fatigue it’s difficult to explain, so don’t feel frustrated if your friends and family don’t understand why you’re struggling. If you think you have post-stroke fatigue, don’t hesitate to consult with your doctor.

 

Tips to Increase Your Energy

The first step in combating post-stroke fatigue is to discuss it with your doctor. Let them know what you’ve been feeling. Your doctor will probably start the process by making sure you’ve had an up-to-date physical. With that information, your doctor can rule out other potential causes for your fatigue or determine if your fatigue might stem from your medication.

It goes without saying, but try to take naps if time allows. Naps won’t cure you of your fatigue long term, but resting when you feel run down can help you feel more refreshed, even if only for a short while.

Do your best to relax. Don’t let your post-stroke fatigue, or any other side effects of your stroke, get you down. Stay positive! Being stressed or tense will only sap you of more energy. A positive attitude goes a long way in feeling upbeat and energetic. Try to get back into the swing of things by returning to your pre-stroke routines. Simple things like staying active and involved with friends and family can yield big benefits.

Yes, it will seem overwhelming at times. Suffering from a stroke, dealing with the aftermath, and having no energy on top of it can be tough, but celebrate your successes. Take baby steps, and be proud of the progress you’ve made. Focus on what you’ve accomplished during your recovery so far, rather than dread what’s left to be done.

 

Tired of Being Tired

Post-stroke fatigue is a daunting condition, and many people who are recovering from a stroke might not even realize they have it, instead thinking they are simply tired. If you’ve had a stroke and find yourself feeling sapped of your energy on a consistent basis, talk to your doctor. There’s a chance you have post-stroke fatigue. You’re not alone; 40 to 70 percent of stroke survivors experience this kind of exhaustion.

By speaking with the proper medical professionals, making it a point to rest as often as possible, and having a positive mindset, you can combat the constant drowsiness and work on returning to your pre-stroke energy levels.

Source: Tired After a Stroke? Understanding Post-Stroke Fatigue | Saebo

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[BLOG POST] How to Prevent or Minimize the Plateau Phase After a Stroke – Saebo

The rehabilitation process throughout the first several months of stroke recovery can be confusing and often daunting, with peaks and valleys that either encourage or slow the healing process. Varying levels of paralysis are common, and adjusting to ongoing therapy requires a shift in mindset and a complete lifestyle overhaul.

Yet, some of the most significant improvements often occur during these early days, reflecting the initial plasticity of the brain. Therefore, gaining momentum during this neurologically progressive time is key to facing the often-frustrating period ahead—a stage known as a plateau. During this stage, it may feel as if the initial spike in progress was the end of successful rehabilitation and that no further improvement is possible. But for some, the plateauing phase is quite common and even to be expected, and understanding this will help both the patient and caregivers to avoid losing hope, motivation, and persistence during this difficult time.

Are plateaus real?

Over the past two decades, research has reaffirmed the frequency and common intricacies of plateauing in newer stroke patients. In the past, it was more likely for doctors to assume that patients only regained motor function in the first few months after a stroke, and that once the plateau occurred, ongoing exercises and therapy were ineffective.

However, recently published reports now show that patients can regain motor recovery and function up to 23 years after a stroke. Medical professionals are now finding that this complex recovery period often continues to occur for months and even years after a patient has left rehab—and primarily resumes only if patients and caretakers build a recovery planand have access to evidence-based technology to prevent the plateau phase after leaving traditional rehabilitation. Designing a home-exercise program, often by upgrading the previous inpatient therapeutic regimen, is the key to maintaining progress or restarting growth if the plateau phase has begun.

What causes a plateau?

When a stroke occurs, a specific area of the brain suffers an infarction, obstructing the blood supply and killing the functionality of a section of the brain. Though this specific area is not recoverable, the area directly surrounding the infarction-impacted region still holds potential for rehabilitation. In the moments directly after the stroke, however, the area simply does not work.

During the initial healing phase known as the subacute phase, which is usually the first three to six months after the stroke, the most consistent and encouraging signs of progress occur in these regions. This natural healing stage often takes place when patients are being coached along in rehab; but if the plateau stage occurs towards the end of  the natural healing phase, it’s common for patients to be sent home for a shift in care.

For this group of patients, this is a difficult transition for several reasons: familiar exercises must be altered and adjusted, the home routine requires greater adaptability, and patients face the discouragement of no longer seeing an uptick in progress, often deterring patients and caretakers from pushing on. Progressing through the discouragement is more easily accomplished when patients and caretakers understand the plateau stage. A solid plan of ongoing, managed care is necessary for continuing to bolster the still-developing parts of the mind.

It’s not the patients that have plateaued, rather treatment options have plateaued them.

It is important to keep in mind that traditional therapy that isn’t evidence-based can be ineffective and can actually causea plateau. Sometimes a patient’s recovery is only as good as the therapist, and if the therapist isn’t modifying the treatment to the patient’s specific needs and incorporating the latest proven interventions because they haven’t been trained or educated, the patient will most likely plateau. If the therapist is well educated on the latest advances and interventions in stroke recovery the patient has a much better chance of avoiding the plateau phase. So, a plateau phase may not be an absolute, it’s a possibility.

How can you overcome a plateau?

After reassuring research, the medical community confirms that working with a managed care professional with a series of ongoing exercises does promote improvement in a stroke patient’s long-term recovery. When signs of recovery seem to stall altogether, here are a few common practices for jumpstarting at-home care.

Saebo Rehabilitation Devices

The brain’s cortical plasticity is a key component in this stage of recovery, and Saebo offers several tools for employing this factor. Motor function and utilization of the hands can be continuously developed with the assistance of the SaeboGlove or SaeboFlex, easing therapy at home with minimal assistance and instruction. The SaeboFlex and SaeboGlove include a proprietary tension system that encourages the extension and grasping strength of the hands of healing stroke patients. This action simultaneously supports brain growth and reprogramming, encouraging the plasticity of the mind through task-oriented exercises.

If patients are unable to functionally use their affected hand, they will develop learned non-use and will eventually reach the plateau phase due to avoidance. The SaeboFlex and and SaeboGlove are two tools that may prevent or minimize the plateau phase and allow patients to engage their affected hand in functional tasks that would otherwise be impossible.

Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy

Similar to the SaeboGlove and SaeboFlex’s use of cortical plasticity, Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) encourages the regrowth of neurological pathways damaged during a stroke. This promotes more meticulous use of the affected hand. By keeping the functional hand from taking full responsibility for daily tasks—usually with a mitt—this method involves preference of the developing side of the brain. Though CIMT is an intensive process, which must be guided and supervised for several-hour stretches at a time, positive results may be seen for years to come.

At-Home Exercises

Maintaining a regimen of exercises that both meets the needs of ongoing recovery and the patient’s comfort is essential to progressing past the plateau stage after traditional rehab. The factor of neuroplasticity allows the brain to constantly adapt, but persistence and regularity is key. When followed correctly, an increase in motor function and strength is probable in many patients. Continuing physical exercise assists with many aspects of the healing process, supporting flexibility, coordination, and balance. Though physical activity does not prevent the occurrence of a second stroke, it will keep the body in key health for recovery.

Staying Motivated

During the difficult transition to home care, supportive family and medical professionals are the vital factor in helping patients maintain motivation and feel guided toward success. As a patient is just beginning the rehabilitation process, it is almost solely in the hands of the assistant to set the tone of the session, and this mutual understanding will drive the exercises forward, making it easier to set and meet small goals along the way. Roadblocks and frustrations are common, but with a structured and steady plan, these stages will pass and times of progress will return.

Handling Emotional Changes

When difficult emotions arise, it is crucial to realize that this is completely normal. Stroke recovery is a long, often slow process, and frustration, anger, and depression are understandable obstacles to encounter. Know that these feelings and physical plateaus will pass with time when both patients and caretakers allow themselves self-care and patience. It is also helpful for families to keep this in mind, as maintaining a genuinely flexible and positive atmosphere during rehabilitation will help all parties see these changes and efforts as a long-term process.

Keep Moving Forward

When heading into long-term stroke treatment, awareness of evidence-based treatment interventions may prevent or decrease the plateauing stage. But with consistent at-home tools and exercises, progress will return, even if it feels slower than in previous phases. The recently damaged brain is taking the necessary time to heal and regrow, and this requires setting short-term goals and celebrating small victories. Reaching the plateau stage is an opportunity to reconsider the next best way forward with your therapist—progress is still ahead, even if the methods and system require a new outlook.

Source: How to Prevent or Minimize the Plateau Phase After a Stroke | Saebo

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[WEB SITE] Hocoma and Saebo Partner to Deliver Compact, Affordable Rehabilitation Solution for Upper Extremities

ArmeoSenso with SaeboMas Mini Body Weight Support System (Photo: Business Wire).

July 17, 2017 10:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time

ZURICH & CHARLOTTE, N.C.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Hocoma and Saebo today announced a partnership to improve the training possibilities for patients with moderate to mild impairments of the upper extremities. Together, the SaeboMas Mini and the ArmeoSenso deliver an easy-to-use, compact solution at an affordable price.

“Saebo is committed to helping patients around the globe achieve a new level of independence”

“Saebo is committed to helping patients around the globe achieve a new level of independence,” said Henry Hoffman, co-founder of Saebo. “Together with an industry leader such as Hocoma, we believe we can maximize the potential of our affordable and evidence-based solutions.”

“We are very excited to be working with Saebo,” said Hocoma CEO and co-founder Dr. Gery Colombo. “Neurological disorders afflict thousands of people each year and by teaming up with another leading player in the industry, we expect to be able to help even more patients recover faster and with better long-term outcomes than conventional rehabilitation therapy can offer.”

In the future, Saebo and Hocoma plan to deepen their partnership. Further solutions are expected to be optimized so that they complement each other as perfectly as the SaeboMas Mini and the ArmeoSenso. Dr. Gery Colombo added: “Our ultimate goal is to provide all patients with a compact, affordable rehabilitation solution – regardless of the specific body parts affected by neurological damage.”

The new partnership can be experienced live at Rehabweek in London from July 17-21.

About Hocoma

A successful therapy begins in patients’ heads. In the firm belief that – step by step – they can reach their goals and regain quality of life.

This is what we work for at the Swiss medtech company Hocoma. With technologies and ideas that look at functional movement therapy from a completely different angle. Because they enable independent exercises and create maximum motivation. Because they challenge people to take courage and support their hopes with personal achievements.

We are committed to creating the ideal therapy. Our awarded robotic and sensor-based devices offer solutions for intensive gait therapy (Lokomat®, Andago®), functional therapy of the upper extremities (Armeo®), robotic mobilization and functional electrical stimulation in early rehabilitation (Erigo®) as well as functional movement therapy within low back pain treatment (Valedo® Therapy Concept) at home and at the clinic. They are the result of intensive research, consistent development and continuous exchange with patients, therapists and partners in research and science.

Those who see to break new grounds need to stay open to exceptional ideas. They have the potential of being exceptionally effective. This guiding principle by Hocoma founder and CEO Dr. Gery Colombo has accompanied us since our start in 2000 and is still lived and implemented by our dedicated employees around the world. At the headquarters in Volketswil near Zurich (Switzerland) and the subsidiaries in the USA, Singapore and Slovenia they achieved a turnover of 30 million CHF in 2016.

About Saebo

Saebo, Inc. is a medical device company primarily engaged in the discovery, development and commercialization of affordable and novel clinical solutions designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 250,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence.

For more information about Saebo, please visit: www.saebo.com.

Product Disclaimer

All Hocoma products are medical devices and must be used in strict adherence to the User Manual; failure to do so may result in serious personal injury. It is strongly recommended that you regularly consult Hocoma’s website (www.hocoma.com/legalnotes) for the latest available information. Please contact Hocoma in case of any questions.

Use only under the supervision of qualified medical personnel. However, certain Hocoma products are marketed for home use and must be strictly used according to the recommendations of your medical care provider who is knowledgeable about your specific needs. Consult the User Manual and Hocoma’s website (www.hocoma.com/legalnotes) for appropriate product designation. Failure to obtain and follow the recommendations of your medical care provider may result in serious personal injury.

This information provides details about medical products which may not be available in all countries and may not have received approval or market clearance by all governmental regulatory bodies throughout the world. Nothing herein should be construed as a solicitation or promotion of any product or of an indication of any specific use for any product which is not authorized by the laws and regulations of the country where the reader of this information resides.

Contacts

Hocoma AG
Mike Fuhrmann, +41 43 444 23 65
Chief Creative Officer
media@hocoma.com
Fax: +41 43 444 22 01
www.hocoma.com

Source: Hocoma and Saebo Partner to Deliver Compact, Affordable Rehabilitation Solution for Upper Extremities | Business Wire

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[BLOG POST] Get Back On Your Feet with Exercises for Foot Drop – Saebo

Foot drop (sometimes called drop foot or dropped foot) is the inability to raise the front of the foot due to weakness or paralysis of the muscles and nerves that lift the foot. Foot drop itself is not a disease, it is a symptom of a greater problem or medical condition.

You can recognize foot drop by how it affects your gait. Someone with foot drop may drag their toes along the ground when walking because they cannot lift the front of their foot with each step. In order to avoid dragging their toes or tripping they might lift their knee higher or swing their leg in a wide arc instead. This is called steppage gait, and is a coping mechanism for foot drop issues.

Causes of Foot Drop

There are three main causes of the weakened nerves or muscles that lead to foot drop:

1: Nerve Injury. The peroneal nerve is the nerve that communicates to the muscles that lift the foot. Damage to the peroneal nerve is the most common cause of foot drop. The nerve wraps from the back of the knee to the front of the shin and sits closely to the surface, making it easy to damage. Damage to the peroneal nerve can be caused by sports injuries, hip or knee replacement surgery, a leg cast, childbirth or even crossing your legs.

2: Muscle Disorders. A condition that causes the muscles to slowly weaken or deteriorate can also cause foot drop. These disorders may include muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease) and polio.

3: Brain or Spinal Disorders. Neurological conditions can also cause foot drop. Conditions may include stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS), cerebral palsy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

How Foot Drop is Treated

Treatment for foot drop requires treating the underlying medical condition that caused it. In some cases foot drop can be permanent, but many people are able to recover. There are a number of treatments that can help with foot drop:

1: Surgery

If your foot drop is caused by a pinched nerve or herniated disc then you will likely have surgery to treat it. Surgery may also be necessary to repair muscles or tendons if they were directly damaged and are causing foot drop. In severe or long term cases, you might have surgery to fuse your ankle and foot bones and improve your gait.

2: Functional Electrical Stimulation

If your foot drop is being caused by damage to the peroneal nerve than Functional Electrical Stimulation may be an alternative to surgery. A small device can be worn or surgically implanted just below the knee that will stimulate the normal function of the nerve, causing the muscle to contract and the foot to lift while walking.

3: Braces or Ankle Foot Orthosis (AFO)

Wearing a brace or AFO that supports the foot in a normal position is a common treatment for foot drop. The device will stabilize your foot and ankle and hold the front part of the foot up when walking. While traditionally doctors have prescribed bulky stiff splints that go inside the shoe, the SaeboStep is a lightweight and cost effective option that provides support outside the shoe.

4: Physical Therapy

Therapy to strengthen the foot, ankle, and lower leg muscles is the primary treatment for foot drop and will generally be prescribed in addition to the treatment options mentioned above. Stretching and range of motion exercises will also help prevent stiffness from developing in the heel.

 

Rehabilitation Exercises for Foot Drop

Specific exercises that strengthen the muscles in the foot, ankle and lower leg can help improve the symptoms of foot drop in some cases. Exercises are important for improving range of motion, preventing injury, improving balance and gait, and preventing muscle stiffness.

When treating foot drop, you may work with a physical therapist who will help you get started strengthening your foot, leg and ankle muscles. Rehabilitation for foot drop can be a slow process, so your physical therapist will likely recommend that you continue to do strengthening exercises at home on your own.

By being consistent about your exercises at home, you can maximize your chances of making a successful recovery from foot drop. Strengthening the weakened muscles will allow you to restore normal function and hopefully start walking normally again.

Like any exercise program, please consult your healthcare professional before you begin. Please stop immediately if any of the following exercises cause pain or harm to your body. It’s best to work with a trained professional for guidance and safety.

Towel Stretch

1-towel-stretch

Sit on the floor with both legs straight out in front of you. Loop a towel or exercise band around the affected foot and hold onto the ends with your hands. Pull the towel or band towards your body. Hold for 30 seconds. Then relax for 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

Toe to Heel Rocks

2-toe-heel-rocks

Stand in front of a table, chair, wall, or another sturdy object you can hold onto for support. Rock your weight forward and rise up onto your toes. Hold this position for 5 seconds. Next, rock your weight backwards onto your heels and lift your toes off the ground. Hold for 5 seconds. Repeat the sequence 6 times.

Marble Pickup

3-marble-pickup

Sit in a chair with both feet flat on the floor. Place 20 marbles and a bowl on the floor in front of you. Using the toes of your affected foot, pick up each marble and place it in the bowl. Repeat until you have picked up all the marbles.

Ankle Dorsiflexion

4-ankle-dorsiflexion

Sit on the floor with both legs straight out in front of you. Take a resistance band and anchor it to a stable chair or table leg. Wrap the loop of the band around the top of your affected foot. Slowly pull your toes towards you then return to your starting position. Repeat 10 times.

Plantar Flexion

5-plantar-flexion

Sit on the floor with both legs straight out in front of you. Take a resistance band and wrap it around the bottom of your foot. Hold both ends in your hands. Slowly point your toes then return to your starting position. Repeat 10 times.

Ball Lift

6-ball-lift

Sit in a chair with both feet flat on the floor. Place a small round object on the floor in front of you (about the size of a tennis ball). Hold the object between your feet and slowly lift it by extending your legs. Hold for 5 seconds then slowly lower. Repeat 10 times.

Get Back On Your Feet

Don’t let foot drop affect your mobility, independence, and quality of life. With proper rehabilitation and assistive devices many people are able to overcome the underlying cause of their symptoms and get back to walking normally. If you are showing symptoms of foot drop, talk to a medical professional about your treatment options.

Which Product is Right for Me?


All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

Source: Get Back On Your Feet with Exercises for Foot Drop | Saebo

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[BLOG POST] Which Saebo Hand Rehabilitation Device is Right For You? – Saebo

 


In 2001, two occupational therapists had one goal: to provide neurological clients access to transformative and life-changing products for improving arm and hand function. Frustrated with the current devices on the market that were limited, expensive, and inaccessible for home use, the founders were inspired to create new, revolutionary solutions.

What started as a dream has now become Saebo, a global provider of affordable rehabilitative products designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 200,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence.

At Saebo, we have three core product lines for hand rehabilitation: The SaeboFlex, SaeboGlove, and SaeboStretch. These three products have helped numerous people overcome limited motor function after suffering a stroke or other neurological or orthopedic condition.

We would love for you to get to know more about these three products and learn about why they work, and more importantly, who they can help. We have committed to making products that are unique and based on the most recent research and evidence available. Learn about three of our unique products:

 

 

SaeboFlex

The SaeboFlex is a high-profile orthosis with an outrigger system that covers the back of hand, fingertips and forearm. This orthosis positions the wrist and fingers into extension to prepare them for object manipulation. With the assistance of the SaeboFlex, the user is able to grasp objects by voluntarily flexing his or her fingers. Once the fingers relax (stop gripping), the extension spring system assists in re-opening the hand to release the object.

Saebo’s functional dynamic orthoses are specifically designed for people suffering from a neurological injury such as a stroke, head injury, and incomplete spinal cord injury. The SaeboFlex gives people the ability to perform grasp-and-release activities, which allows them to participate in task-oriented hand training. Evidence-based research supports this training as critical to recovery. The SaeboFlex is appropriate for individuals with minimal to severe tone/spasticity.

Here is an example of a man trying to pick up a ball six weeks after his stroke with and without the SaeboFlex. You can also see his improvement after six months of training:

SaeboGlove

The SaeboGlove is a low-profile, lightweight glove that helps clients suffering from neurological and orthopedic injuries incorporate their hand functionally in therapy and at home. The proprietary tension system has elastic bands that offer various tensions for individual finger joints. The tension system extends the client’s fingers and thumb following grasping and assists with hand opening.

The ideal candidate for the SaeboGlove is suffering from minimal to no spasticity or contracture. People with more severe soft-tissue shortening would need a high-profile orthosis like the SaeboFlex. For appropriate candidates, the SaeboGlove can be worn to assist with day-to-day functional tasks and during grasp-and-release exercises/activities. This new-found freedom leads to improved motor recovery and functional independence.

This video shows a man attempting grasp-and-release activities with and without the assistance of the SaeboGlove:

SaeboStretch

The SaeboStretch is a soft and adjustable dynamic resting hand splint recognizable for its unique strapping system. This splint is worn to stretch and prevent soft-tissue shortening and helps neurologically impaired clients maintain or improve motion. Saebo’s energy-storing technology allows individuals suffering from spasticity to stretch comfortably and safely, resulting in increased motivation and compliance.

The SaeboStretch is appropriate for people suffering from minimal to moderate spasticity. The orthosis includes the choice of three tension plates that offer various levels of resistance depending on the amount of tone and spasticity the individual has. The flexible hand plates also prevent or minimize joint pain and deformities. The SaeboStretch can be worn during the day or when sleeping.

See how the SaeboStretch is custom fit to the individual in this video:

Our Expert Recommendations

Over the last ten years, Saebo has grown into a leading global provider of rehabilitative products created through the unrelenting leadership and the strong network of clinicians around the world. We are growing this commitment to affordability and accessibility even further by making our newest, most innovative products more available than ever.

If your loved one is recovering from a neurological or orthopedic injury and wants to know if one of Saebo’s products is right for them, take our free 5-minute evaluation. Completing this survey will provide all of the information needed to ensure the best possible product recommendations. Upon completion of your survey, you will receive personalized suggestions tailored to your specific needs and abilities. In addition, our Product Specialists will be happy to review these recommendations with your physician or therapist.


All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

Source: Which Saebo Hand Rehabilitation Device is Right For You? | Saebo

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[BLOG POST] Driving After Stroke: Is it Safe? -Saebo

After having a stroke, many survivors are eager to start driving again. Driving offers independence and the ability to go where you want to go on your own schedule, so it is no surprise that survivors want to get back behind the wheel rather than rely on someone else for their transportation needs.

Unfortunately, having a stroke can have lasting effects that make driving more difficult. A survivor might not be aware of all of the effects of their stroke and could misjudge their ability to drive safely. Driving against a doctor’s orders after a stroke is not only dangerous, it may even be illegal. Many stroke survivors successfully regain their ability to safely drive after a stroke, but it is important that they do not attempt to drive until they are cleared by their healthcare provider.

 

How Stroke Affects the Ability to Drive

Having a stroke can affect an individual’s ability to drive in numerous ways, whether it be because of physical challenges, cognitive changes, or other challenges.

 

Physical Challenges

Physical-Challenges

After a stroke, it’s common to experience weakness or paralysis on one side of the body, depending on which side of the brain the stroke occurred. More than half of all stroke survivors also experience post-stroke pain. Minor physical challenges may be overcome with adaptive driving equipment, but severe challenges like paralysis or contracture can seriously affect an individual’s ability to drive.

 

Cognitive Effects

cognitive

Driving requires a combination of cognitive skills, including memory, concentration, problem solving, judgement, multitasking, and the ability to make quick decisions. A stroke can cause cognitive changes that limit the ability to do many of those things.

 

Vision Problems

vision

As many as two-thirds of stroke victims experience vision impairments as a result of a stroke. This can include vision loss, blurred vision, and visual processing problems. Stroke survivors with vision problems should not drive until their problems are resolved and they have been cleared by a doctor.

 

Fatigue

fatigue

Fatigue is a common physical condition after a stroke that affects between 40 and 70 percent of stroke survivors. Fatigue can arrive without warning, so it is dangerous to drive when suffering from post-stroke fatigue.

 

Warning Signs of Unsafe Driving

 

Stroke survivors are not always aware of how their stroke has limited their ability to drive. If they are choosing to drive after their stroke against their doctor’s advice, it is important for them and their loved ones to look out for warning signs that they might not be ready to start driving. Here are some of the common warning signs to look out for:

  • Driving faster or slower than the posted speed or the wrong speed for the current driving conditions
  • Consistently asking for instruction and help from passengers
  • Ignoring posted signs or signals
  • Making slow or poor decisions
  • Becoming easily frustrated or confused
  • Getting lost in familiar areas
  • Being in an accident or having close calls
  • Drifting into other lanes

 

If you or your loved one is showing any of these warning signs, immediately stop yourself or them from driving until your or their driving is tested.

 

Driving Again After a Stroke

Before a stroke survivor begins driving again, they should speak with their doctor or therapist to discuss whether or not it would be safe for them to continue driving. Many states require mandatory reporting by a physician to the DMV if their patient has impairments that may affect their driving after a stroke. Even if their doctor clears them to drive, they still will likely need to be evaluated by the DMV before they regain their driving privileges.

 

Driver rehabilitation specialists are available to help stroke survivors evaluate their driving ability from behind the wheel. There are also driver’s training programs that provide a driving evaluation, classroom instruction, and suggestions for modifying a car to the individual driver’s needs. For instance, an occupational therapist can provide a comprehensive in-clinic evaluation of a client’s current skills and deficits relative to driving.

 

From there a client could be sent for an in-vehicle assessment for further evaluation by a certified driver rehabilitation specialist (CDRS). They can assess driving skills in a controlled and safe environment. An in-vehicle driving test is the most thorough way to gauge a driver’s abilities. Each assessment takes about 1 hour and involves driving with a trained evaluator or driving in a computer simulator.

 

The “behind-the-wheel” evaluation will include testing for changes in key performance areas such as attention, memory, vision, reaction time, and coordination. After this assessment the CDRS can determine if the client is safe to drive, can not drive at all, or may drive with additional recommendations.

 

Often times clients may require certain modifications to their car in order to drive safely. In addition, some clients may benefit from on-going classroom training and simulation training in order to meet safety standards. These are all services that a driver rehabilitation specialist can provide. To help find these resources, The Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists has a directory of certified driver rehabilitation specialists, driver rehabilitation specialists, and mobility equipment dealers and manufacturers.

 

Get Back Behind the Wheel

Many stroke survivors successfully drive after a stroke; however, not all are able to. While reclaiming independence is important, staying safe is the greatest concern. It is important for stroke survivors to listen to their doctors and wait until they are fully ready before attempting to drive again. With some hard work and patience, getting back behind the wheel is possible.

 


All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

Source: Driving After Stroke: Is it Safe? | Saebo

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[WEB SITE] What Is Spasticity – Saebo

What is Spasticity?

Spasticity is a neuromuscular condition usually caused by damage to the portion of the brain or spinal cord that controls voluntary movement. The damage causes a change in the balance of signals between the nervous system and the muscles. It is typically found in people with cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury.

Charley horse is an understatement.

Spasticity is often described as tight, stiff muscles or spasms that may make movement, posture, and balance difficult. It negatively affects muscles and joints of the extremities, and is particularly harmful to growing children. Individuals with mild spasticity may experience muscle tightness whereas severe spasticity may produce painful, uncontrollable spasms of the extremities; most commonly the legs and arms. This can interfere with functional recovery and curtail rehabilitation efforts.

Unintended consequences.

Spasticity can be disabling and if left untreated, or sub-optimally managed, it may lead to adverse effects such as:

  • Contractures
  • Muscle and joint deformitiesv
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Chronic constipation
  • Fever or other systemic illnesses
  • Pressure sores
  • Overactive reflexes
  • Pain
  • Decreased functional abilities and delayed motor development
  • Difficulty with care and hygiene
  • Abnormal posture
  • Bone and joint deformities

Loosening the grip.

Common treatment interventions for spasticity vary from conservative (therapy) to more aggressive (surgery). Typically, a variety of treatment options are used simultaneously to maximize results. Current spasticity treatment options may include the following:

  • Oral medications
  • Injectable medications
  • Stretching
  • Orthoses
  • Casting
  • Electrotherapeutics
  • Cryotherapy
  • Surgery

Source: What Is Spasticity | Saebo

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[WEB SITE] Stroke Recovery Exercises for Your Whole Body – Saebo

Stroke survival rates have improved a lot over the last few years. Stroke was once the third leading cause of death in the United States, but it fell to fourth place in 2008 and fifth place in 2013. Today, strokes claim an average of 129,000 American lives every year. Reducing stroke deaths in America is a great improvement, but we still have a long way to go in improving the lives of stroke survivors.

Stagnant recovery rates and low quality of life for stroke survivors are unfortunately very common. Just 10% of stroke survivors make a full recovery. Only 25% of all survivors recover with minor impairments. Nearly half of all stroke survivors continue to live with serious impairments requiring special care, and 10% of survivors live in nursing homes, skilled nursing facilities, and other long-term healthcare facilities. It’s easy to see why stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States. By 2030, it’s estimated that there could be up to 11 million stroke survivors in the country.

Traditionally, stroke rehabilitation in America leaves much to be desired in terms of recovery and quality of life. There is a serious gap between stroke patients being discharged and transitioning to physical recovery programs. In an effort to improve recovery and quality of life, the American Heart Association has urged the healthcare community to prioritize exercise as an essential part of post-stroke care.

Unfortunately, too few healthcare professionals prescribe exercise as a form of therapy for stroke, despite its many benefits for patients. Many stroke survivors are not given the skills, confidence, knowledge, or tools necessary to follow an exercise program. However, that can change.

With the right recovery programs that prioritize exercise for rehabilitation, stroke survivors can “relearn” crucial motors skills to regain a high quality of life. Thanks to a phenomenon known as neuroplasticity, even permanent brain damage doesn’t make disability inevitable.

A stroke causes loss of physical function because it temporarily or permanently damages the parts of the brain responsible for those functions. The same damage is also responsible for behavioral and cognitive changes, which range from memory and vision problems to severe depression and anger. Each of these changes correspond to a specific region of the brain that was damaged due to stroke.

For example, damage in the left hemisphere of your brain will cause weakness and paralysis on the right side of your body. If a stroke damages or kills brain cells in the right hemisphere, you may struggle to understand facial cues or control your behavior. However, brain damage due to stroke is not necessarily permanent.

For more Visit Site —> Stroke Recovery Exercises for Your Whole Body

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[WEB SITE] A Timeline of Stroke Recovery – Saebo

a-timeline-of-stroke-recovery-blog
As a patient recovers from a stroke, both they and their caregivers must understand that the process is slow and uncertain. This is because the severity of the stroke can vary, and doctors, nurses, and therapists can only estimate the response of each patient based on the location of the stroke. In general, those who have suffered severe strokes will recover more slowly and require a longer, more delayed period to do so.

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During the first weeks and sometimes months following a stroke, a patient’s’ speaking ability, mental clarity, and physical movements may improve. Though it depends on the person, these improvements can continue to increase several months, or possibly years, after the stroke.

While recovering, support and encouragement from friends and family, as well as the survivor’s own attitude, are vital to making progress. Different patients recuperate in a variety of ways, but there are specific milestones they and members of their support system should be looking out for.

What is a Stroke?

(source: Wikimedia – Blausen Medical Communications, Inc.)

  • A stroke occurs when the blood flow to a section of the brain is stopped due to fragmented blood vessels or blood clots. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 795,000 people have a stroke each year in the United States.

Stroke Occurs- The Brain Reacts

  • Recovery following a stroke starts as the brain responds to what’s happened. The brain’s functions will be adjusted to account for the the death or reduction of the affected area.

Three Hours In

  • If a stroke victim receives medical attention within three hours of suffering the stroke they may be a candidate to receive medication to break up clots via an IV-drip. This clot-destroying medicine can significantly reduce negative long-term disabilities in the patient.

Initial Recovery

  • The rehabilitation process begins after doctors have assessed and treated any critical conditions in the patient, and taken precautionary steps to prevent additional complications. This means rehabilitation could begin during the patient’s first hospital visit, which will increase the likelihood of recovering damaged body and brain function.
  • Range of motion exercises, changing positions (seated or lying down), and, if possible, standing or walking will be encouraged by the doctor.
  • After leaving the hospital the patient will either go to a nursing facility, inpatient rehabilitation center, or straight back to their home. Each stage of recuperation is designed to help the survivor reclaim their independence and return home as soon as possible.
  • Following the return home, therapy will continue in an outpatient facility or during in-home visits. Some patients may also do rehab on their own using home-therapy tools or following videos online.

Five–Six Weeks

  • The first five to six weeks of stroke recovery are the most intensive. During this time patients will go through inpatient or outpatient therapy, contingent on their condition and accessibility to a rehabilitation center.
  • Intense physical and occupational therapy will take place five or six days per week. There may also be the (more expensive) option of receiving in-home physical and occupational therapy treatment. This is optimal for elderly patients without access to a local treatment center.

Three Months

  • The first three months of recovery are when a patient will see the most improvement, and gains may happen rapidly over time. Some stroke survivors will continue to improve after this period, however, If the brain stem was affected during the stroke recovery could take up to a year or even longer.

Six Months

  • Although they do not occur as rapidly as they did during the first three months, the majority of improvements happen within the first six months of the initial stroke. A stroke survivor’s ability to improve during this period relies on their individual effort and the support of their friends, family, and doctors.

Two Years

  • For stroke survivors who suffer from aphasia (25 to 40 percent) it can take up to two years to fully regain their speaking ability.

The Challenging Path to Stroke Recovery

While every stroke survivor has a different and challenging path, this timeline covers the major milestones that they can expect during the recovery process. It is important to realize that it will take constant and consistent work and relearning, as well as adjustments and help from family and friends, for stroke patients to successfully recover.

Stats on Recovery

  • 10% of stroke survivors recover almost completely
  • 25% recover with minor impairments
  • 40% experience moderate to severe impairments requiring special care
  • 10% require care in a nursing home or other long-term care facility
  • 15% die shortly after the stroke

Sources

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

Source: A Timeline of Stroke Recovery | Saebo

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[WEB SITE] How neurorehabilitation helps with stroke recovery.

How Neurorehabilitation Helps With Stroke Recovery.

Neurorehabilitation utilizes the help of occupational therapy and physical therapy with patients and their families to build back the skills and attitudes of people affected by hemiparetic stroke. The main goal is to get their skills to work at the highest level, so patients can rebuild self-esteem and a positive mood. Recovering from a stroke can be a long, almost hopeless process, but with the new adaption skills patients learn, they become empowered and gain the skills for community reintegration.

Neurorehabilitation therapies teach or retrain patients how to improve or recover their communication and mobility skills, as well as other aspects of their daily lives. In its treatments, neurorehabilitation focuses on the psychological, creative, and nutritional elements of each individual’s recovery.

  • Holistic. Provide not only physical and cognitive recovery, but also include psychological, social, and cultural aspects of the patient’s personality and those of their family.
  • Patient Focused.  Health-care strategies customized to the needs of the patient and their family.Developed and implemented by multidisciplinary teams of qualified and motivated practitioners experienced in similar types of collaboration.
  • Inclusive. Developed and implemented by multidisciplinary teams of qualified and motivated practitioners experienced in similar types of collaboration.
  • Participatory. Patient and family are actively involved and build a trusting relationship, work together with the team of medical professionals.
  • Sparing. Help the patient maximize independence and reduce physical impairment, dependence on mobility aids.
  • Lifelong. Supports and follow-up carried out from injury onset to the highest possible level of recovery of function, even later in life.
  • Resolving. Include adequate resources for efficiently attending to each patient’s difficulties as they arise.
  • Community focused. Find solutions that best fit aspects of the community and create resources that assist the patient in social reintegration.

Customized Neurorehabilitation

Neurorehabilitation can be divided into measures that aim to (1) help the patient adapt to or compensate for their impairments or (2) reduce impairments. The latter addresses underlying neurological deficits more directly but is relatively poorly understood.

Various neurorehabilitation programs, which are offered by hospitals or at private, specialized clinics, have a broad range of professionals in different neurophysiologic areas to provide the most comprehensive treatment and customized approach to allow patients and their families to live more normal lives.

Each year, newer methods and neurophysiologic technologies are developed and implemented, allowing more opportunities for patients. Since the field of neurorehabilitation is relatively new, however, many strategies are controversial because they don’t yet have the research to support their results…visit our blog to read more

At Saebo, we offer a wide range of affordable, evidence-based, rehabilitation products designed for in-home use.  To learn more about these products visit our website or click the button below to request additional information.

Source: How neurorehabilitation helps with stroke recovery.

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