Posts Tagged seizure

[WEB SITE] New method uses advanced noninvasive neuroimaging to localize and identify epileptic lesions

Epilepsy affects more than 65 million people worldwide. One-third of these patients have seizures that are not controlled by medications. In addition, one-third have brain lesions, the hallmark of the disease, which cannot be located by conventional imaging methods. Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have piloted a new method using advanced noninvasive neuroimaging to recognize the neurotransmitter glutamate, thought to be the culprit in the most common form of medication-resistant epilepsy. Their work is published today in Science Translational Medicine.

Glutamate is an amino acid which transmits signals from neuron to neuron, telling them when to fire. Glutamate normally docks with the neuron, gives it the signal to fire and is swiftly cleared. In patients with epilepsy, stroke and possibly ALS, the glutamate is not cleared, leaving the neuron overwhelmed with messages and in a toxic state of prolonged excitation.

In localization-related epilepsy, the most common form of medication-resistant epilepsy, seizures are generated in a focused section of the brain; in 65 percent of patients, this occurs in the temporal lobe. Removal of the seizure-generating region of the temporal lobe, guided by preoperative MRI, can offer a cure. However, a third of these patients have no identified abnormality on conventional imaging studies and, therefore, more limited surgical options.

“Identification of the brain region generating seizures in location-related epilepsy is associated with significantly increased chance of seizure freedom after surgery,” said the new study’s lead author, Kathryn Davis, MD, MSTR, an assistant professor of Neurology at Penn. “The aim of the study was to investigate whether a novel imaging method, developed at Penn, could use glutamate to localize and identify the epileptic lesions and map epileptic networks in these most challenging patients.”

“We theorized that if we could develop a technique which allows us to track the path of and make noninvasive measurements of glutamate in the brain, we would be able to better identify the brain lesions and epileptic foci that current methods miss,” said senior author Ravinder Reddy, PhD, a professor of Radiology and director of Penn’s Center for Magnetic Resonance and Optical Imaging.

Reddy’s lab developed the glutamate chemical exchange saturation transfer (GluCEST) imaging method, a very high resolution magnetic resonance imaging contrast method not available before now, to measure how much glutamate was in different regions of the brain including the hippocampi, two structures within the left and right temporal lobes responsible for short- and long-term memory and spatial navigation and the most frequent seizure onset region in adult epilepsy patients.

The study tested four patients with medication-resistant epilepsy and 11 controls. In all four patients, concentrations of glutamate were found to be higher in one of the hippocampi, and confirmatory methods (electroencephalography and magnetic resonance spectra) verified independently that the hippocampus with the elevated glutamate was located in the same hemisphere as the epileptic focus/lesion. Consistent lateralization to one side was not seen in the control group.

While preliminary, this work indicates the ability of GluCEST to detect asymmetrical hippocampal glutamate levels in patients thought to have nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy. The authors say this approach could reduce the need for invasive intracranial monitoring, which is often associated with complications, morbidity risk, and added expense.

“This demonstration that GluCEST can localize small brain hot spots of high glutamate levels is a promising first step in our research,” Davis said. “By finding the epileptic foci in more patients, this approach could guide clinicians toward the best therapy for these patients, which could translate to a higher rate of successful surgeries and improved outcomes from surgery or other therapies in this difficult disease.”

Source: Penn Medicine

Source: New method uses advanced noninvasive neuroimaging to localize and identify epileptic lesions

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[WEB SITE] The 10 best epilepsy apps – Medical News Today

Epilepsy apps help you to log your symptoms and potential triggers for seizures, as well as their duration and severity.

Living with epilepsy is more than just knowing your seizure types, the right medication, and dosage. Apps designed for tackling epilepsy can help you to take a practical approach to your seizures and manage how the condition affects your social, emotional, and physical well-being.

Epilepsy is a neurological condition affecting an estimted 3.4 million individuals in the United States. The main symptom of epilepsy is repeated seizures, which affect everyone differently depending on the part of the brain that is involved.

While some people have seizures that cause the body to jerk and shake, others experience unusual sensations or loss of consciousness. Most seizures occur randomly, but stresssleep deprivation, alcohol, certain medications, specific foods, and flashing bright lights can also trigger them.

You may find that your seizures have a pattern or are more likely to occur in certain situations. It can be useful to record your symptoms and seizures in an epilepsy tracking app or journal, and share the information with a healthcare profession or epilepsy specialist.

Here are Medical News Today‘s choices of the 10 best epilepsy apps.

HealthUnlocked

iPhone: Free

HealthUnlocked logo

HealthUnlocked is a health-based social network. With more than 600 communities, HealthUnlocked matches you with other people that are interested in similar health-related topics or are in the same health situation.

On sign-up, you can add your health conditions, including epilepsy, and choose other subjects that interest you. These can be altered at any time. By searching communities using keywords such as “epilepsy” and “seizures,” groups are suggested that are relevant for you to join.

Becoming a member of a community allows you to post questions, learn from the experience of others, and receive emotional support. The app also recommends communities, content, people to connect with, and services.

Seizure Tracker

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Seizure Tracker logo

Seizure Tracker is quick and easy to set up on your smartphone and can be used immediately after download. The app is designed to help you to manage epilepsy by logging seizures and keeping records of their length, type, potential triggers, and a description of associated symptoms.

Created by the parents of a child with epilepsy, Seizure Tracker’s goal is to empower those with epilepsy while redefining how information about the condition and seizures is collected and shared.

The app’s Quick Capture button allows you to time and record seizures as they happen and upload them to YouTube for private sharing. When the video and timer are stopped, the app enters an event log that is stored in your Seizure Library. The app can also be used without the video function.

Seizure First Aide

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Seizure First Aide logo

Seizure First Aide is an app developed by the Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota that could save a life. One in 10 individuals in the U.S will have a seizure in their lifetime, according to the Foundation, and Seizure First Aide provides basic real-time first aid for anyone who observes a seizure happening – whatever the seizure type.

The First Aid icon on the dashboard gives you the four vital steps you need to follow if you encounter a seizure. You can also record the duration of the seizure with the Timer icon.

Videos are included in the app that show the five most common types of seizure to help you to identify what seizure type you have witnessed, and a Get Help emergency icon is included that recommends you call 911 if a seizure lasts more than 5 minutes.

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Snug Safety

iPhone: Free

Snug Safety logo

Snug Safety is a daily check-in service that provides peace of mind for individuals that live alone. Snug Safety checks in with you every day, and if they do not receive a response from you, they will notify your emergency contacts and send for help.

If you live on your own and are worried about experiencing severe seizures, Snug Safety could be a useful solution. The makers say to think of the app as a modern medical alert that is designed to be positive, proactive, and friendly.

The free plan includes alerting emergency contacts if someone does not check in at their regular time, and an upgrade is available to a dispatch plan, wherein a personal dispatcher will call or coordinate a wellness check to the individual’s last known location.

ICE Medical Standard

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

ICE Medical Standard logo

Seizures can happen anywhere and at any time. ICE Medical Standard allows you to share key emergency information with a first responder on your phone’s lock screen. You can add the phone numbers of your emergency contacts, information about any medication that you take, any medical conditions that you have, and other essential information that could save vital time in an emergency situation.

The app guides you through entering the emergency information and then saves this as a lock screen image, meaning that a first responder only needs to power up your phone to see all the information they require. You can also set a color code based on your condition, with red indicating that you have a health condition such as epilepsy.

The app’s developers, About the Kids Foundation, advise that a smartphone is used as a backup in this type of situation, as it could lose power or otherwise be overlooked. They say that you should use an ICE Medical Standard ID Card, as well. However, this app could make all the difference in a medical emergency.

Epilepsy Journal

Android: Free

Epilepsy Journal logo

Epilepsy Journal is an app designed primarily for logging your seizures as they happen. The first thing you will notice when you install the app is the large purple button marked “Seizure,” which makes logging the start and end of a seizure simple.

You can also log rescue medication, possible triggers, the activity you were doing at the time of the seizure, and your location. From these entries, you can generate reports, view trends, and even email your doctor.

The app’s creator, Olly Tree Applications, say that the inspiration for the app was driven by the person’s experiences with their daughter, who has severe epilepsy. They developed the app to allow people with the condition to communicate their symptoms and possible triggers quickly.

myChildren’s

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

myChildrens logo

myChildren’s is an app from the Nationwide Children’s Hospital that allows parents to track and manage their child’s healthcare needs. Although the app allows for tracking a wide range of healthcare needs, such as regular medication, it has a specialized built-in epilepsy toolkit.

After entering your child’s details, you can elect to add the Epilepsy Toolkit, which takes you to a specialized add-on. The add-on allows you to record the details of seizures including their type, description, possible triggers, and date and time. It also contains a section where you can enter information about the emergency treatment that your child needs and a useful list of resources about the condition.

While the app is not specifically for managing epilepsy, it is a valuable tool for storing and accessing information about your child’s medical needs in one place.

Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

Neurology Now

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Neurology Now logo

Neurology Now is a journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Published on a bi-monthly basis, Neurology Now features the latest groundbreaking research and news in neurology diagnosis, treatment, and management.

In-depth perspectives and tips on living with neurological disorders, including epilepsy, are included in the publication, along with inspiring stories written by patients and caregivers.

Articles include answers from experts to common questions about a condition, a closer look at particular treatments, advice on managing the cost of care, tips on managing your neurological condition, and the most recent research and promising treatments.

Epilepsy Health Storylines

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Epilepsy Health Storylines logo

Epilepsy Health Storylines is an app designed to be “more than just a seizure tracker.” The app provides a variety of tools aimed at helping you to manage your condition. Its comprehensive feature set includes recording symptoms, seizures, moods, and setting reminders for taking medication.

The symptom tracker is well designed with a lookup search to allow you to enter the symptoms that you often experience. These are then saved to your home screen, allowing fast entry of the severity of the symptom, the effect that it had on your day, and how your mood was at the time.

The Daily Vitals screen displays trends over time that you can show your doctor. Other tools include the medication tracker, which allows you to enter your specific medications from pre-populated lists with the times of day that you need to take them.

SeizAlarm

iPhone: 2-week free trial

SeizAlarm logo

SeizAlarm is an app for people with epilepsy and other seizure-related disorders to alert their emergency contacts manually if they think that they will need help soon, or automatically if a seizure-like motion is detected by an iPhone or Apple Watch.

The app monitors for abnormal repetitive motion or elevated heart rate and notifies your emergency contacts accordingly. If you plan on taking part in an activity that may trigger false seizure detection, you can disable this feature.

SeizAlarm has a help request feature that can be activated if you require immediate help, and logs are kept of your requests to retain for your records. When a help request is sent, your location is captured and sent on to your emergency contacts so that they can easily find you.

Source: The 10 best epilepsy apps

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[WEB SITE] What should you do if a friend has a seizure?

Seizures are a fairly common occurrence, but would you know what to do – and what not to do – if you witnessed one?

Ten percent of people are expected to experience a seizure at some point during their lifetime, but would you know what to do if someone was having a seizure right next to you? Would you recognize it for what it was? Here, we give you an overview of different types of seizures and offer some helpful first aid tips.

Seizures normally take place when there is an abnormal “spike” of electrical activity in the brain. More often than not, seizures are associated with brain conditions (usually epilepsy) but can sometimes also be experienced by people without an epilepsy diagnosis.

In the United States, 3 million adults and 470,000 children have epilepsy, according to estimatesfrom the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This means that 1 in 10 people may experience a seizure in their lifetime.

Epileptic seizures fall under two categories: generalized seizures (in which the whole brain is affected), and focal, or partial, seizures (which are localized and only affect one part of the brain).

All types of seizures usually happen suddenly, and most people who experience them cannot tell that they are coming, so they will be unable to give any warning. Also, typically, an individual experiencing a seizure will not remember what happened during that episode.

One person prone to seizures due to her epilepsy describes her experiences.

A seizure feels like being dragged deep under water. I feel like I can’t catch my breath. For me, [it] feels like electricity stuns and weakens every nerve ending in my body. It feels as though black ink is bleeding inward from every which way, causing my vision to slowly fade out. My verbal communication is a pile of babbling gravel.”

Seizures can last from a few seconds to a few minutes (usually under 5), depending on the type and severity of the event.

Seizure do’s and don’ts

People who have epilepsy may experience one or several kinds of seizure. Below, we look at the different kinds of generalized and focal seizures and give you tips on how to recognize them, as well as how best to support someone who is experiencing them.

Generalized seizures

1. Absence seizures. Also referred to as “petit mal,” meaning “small harm” or “little illness” in French, these are unlikely to look like seizures to the unsuspecting external observer.

The person having an absence seizure will appear to be distracted or absent (hence its name), staring blankly into the distance and blinking rapidly. This kind of seizure will only last a few seconds, and the person experiencing it will typically not realize that they even had it.

Absence seizures do not require any intervention. Just stay calm, and once the seizure is over, treat the person as you normally would.

2. Tonic-clonic seizures. These seizures are the ones that you will likely have seen depicted in television shows and movies.

They do not manifest in the exact same way in all individuals but usually involve the individual crying out, falling down, losing awareness, experiencing muscle spasms (hence “tonic,” which refers to shaking and jerking) and stiffening (hence “clonic,” which refers to muscular stiffness), and breathing rapidly and with difficulty.

These seizures are also called “grand mal,” meaning “great harm” or “great illness” in French. They may last up to a few minutes, and they leave the person dazed and physically exhausted.

If you witness someone experiencing a tonic-clonic seizure, your main priority should be to ensure that they are safe and do not get hurt. Make sure to:

  • cluttered room

    If someone is having a tonic-clonic seizure, your top priority should be to make sure that they do not get injured. Move them away from any heavy furniture and remove any potentially dangerous objects from their vicinity.

    Ease them to the ground if possible, to avoid a severe fall that may hurt them.

  • Put something soft (such as a folded jacket or sweater) under their head, to avoid head injuries.
  • Move them away (if possible) from large objects, including hard furniture, sharp edges, or hot surfaces (such as heaters), that may injure them.
  • Remove any small, hard objects or sharp objects (such as knives) that may surround them, to make sure that they do not get hurt.
  • Loosen any tight clothing or accessories around their neck (including ties and scarves), to make sure that they can breathe properly. Also, remove eyeglasses or sunglasses.
  • Similarly, remove any clothing items that may surround them, and which may accidentally wind around their neck and suffocate them.
  • As soon as you can, roll them onto their side. This is the first aid recovery position, which will allow the person to breathe more easily.

You must absolutely not:

  • Hold the person down or attempt to restrain them in any way; this is very dangerous for everyone involved, as a person experiencing a seizure cannot control their movements.
  • Attempt to put anything in their mouth. A popular myth suggests that inserting a wooden spoon will prevent the individual from swallowing their tongue or from biting it. No one can swallow their own tongue, and while a person experiencing a seizure may bite theirs, trying to insert anything into their mouths will only succeed in hurting their gums and teeth or making them choke.
  • Attempt to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation; the person will typically regain normal breathing patterns once the seizure subsides.

It is also very important that you stay calm throughout and do not forget to time the seizure. This is a crucial step because, according to CDC guidelines, you must call an ambulance if the seizure lasts for longer than 5 minutes.

 

Focal seizures

1. Simple focal seizures. A person experiencing one of these may exhibit twitchiness – particularly in the face muscles – and may think that they are smelling or tasting something strange. Similar to the absence seizure, the simple focal seizure does not require any special intervention and normally lasts between a few seconds and a couple of minutes.

2. Complex focal seizures. This seizure type will make the person feel confused and disorientated, and they may not be able to respond clearly to questions or sustain any kind of interaction.

If you notice that someone is experiencing a complex focal seizure, stay calm, try to direct them to someplace safe (for example, away from moving cars), and speak to them gently and reassuringly. Do not leave them until the seizure has subsided – usually after about 2 minutes – and they have regained full awareness.

3. Secondary generalized seizures. These will typically start out as a regular focal seizure, only to evolve into a generalized, tonic-clonic seizure. In this case, you should follow the same guidelines as those outlined above.

What about non-epileptic seizures?

Non-epileptic seizures (NES), or “psychogenic non-epileptic seizures,” are not linked to abnormal electrical activity in the brain in the same way that epileptic seizures are. Instead, these are often caused by psychological factors, such as exposure to extreme stress, or are linked to psychiatric disorders.

These types of seizure are normally of three kinds:

woman feeling anxious

Other conditions and disorders can cause non-epileptic seizures. A panic attack, for instance, can manifest in a similar way to a regular seizure.

  • dissociative, which means that the person experiencing them has no awareness of, or control over, the event
  • panic attacks, which can make the person feel faint and be unable to breathe, and which make their heart race
  • brought on by a psychiatric disorder that makes the person to want to “trigger” or “stage” a seizure because they want to attract a degree of medical or social attention

Dissociative seizures and panic attacks are the most common NES. The general first aid guidelines for NES are usually the same as for epileptic seizures, and they focus on keeping the person safe from injury as the seizure unfolds.

For more information on seizures in general, the people who experience them, and what you can do to help, you can visit the Epilepsy Foundation website.

Source: What should you do if a friend has a seizure?

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[BLOG POST] Alcohol, Seizures and Brain Injury  

A drunk driving accident.  A fight at a bar after a night of drinking.  Many brain injury survivors received their brain injuries while under the influence of alcohol.  In fact, studies have shown that between 35% and 81% of people who received a traumatic brain injury had been drinking at the time of their injury.  Doctors and therapists routinely recommend that survivors abstain from alcohol after a brain injury but some survivors ignore this advice.  But drinking after a brain injury has a new and more dangerous risk than before, namely post-injury seizures.

In general, brain injury survivors are more prone to developing a seizure disorder than are people without brain injuries.  Depending on the severity and location of a traumatic brain injury, research shows that post-traumatic brain injury seizure rates are between 2-50%.  Similarly, post-stroke seizure rates are between 5-20%.  Both of these are significantly higher than the seizure rate in the general population.

Unfortunately, alcohol can raise both the likelihood and frequency of post-injury seizures.  Alcohol lowers the threshold for seizures to occur, making a seizure more likely to happen.  For those already taking anti-seizure medication, alcohol can interfere with the performance of the medication, causing the medication to be ineffective and allowing more seizures to occur.  As a seizure can be a potentially life-threatening medical issue, anything that raises the likelihood of seizures should be avoided.

Overall, it is smart for many reasons to avoid consuming alcohol after an injury.  But the risk of seizures is an important reason which should not be ignored.

Learn about brain injury treatment services at the Transitional Learning Center! Visit us at: http://tlcrehab.org/

Source: Alcohol, Seizures and Brain Injury | The Transitional Learning Center’s Blog

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[WEB SITE] Compound derived from marijuana interacts with antiepileptic drugs

New research published in Epilepsia, a journal of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), suggests that an investigational neurological treatment derived from cannabis may alter the blood levels of commonly used antiepileptic drugs. It is important for clinicians to consider such drug interactions during treatment of complex conditions.

Cannabidiol (CBD), a compound developed from the cannabis plant, is being studied as a potential anticonvulsant, and it has demonstrated effectiveness in animal models of epilepsy and in humans. An ongoing open label study (Expanded Access Program) conducted by investigators at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is testing the potential of CBD as a therapy for children and adults with difficult to control epilepsy. The study includes 39 adults and 42 children, all of whom receive CBD.

Because all of the participants are also taking other seizure drugs while they are receiving the investigational therapy, investigators checked the blood levels of their other seizure drugs to see if they changed. “With any new potential seizure medication, it is important to know if drug interactions exist and if there are labs that should be monitored while taking a specific medication,” said lead author Tyler Gaston, MD.

Dr. Gaston and her colleagues found that there were significant changes in levels of the drugs clobazam (and its active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam), topiramate, and rufinamide in both adults and children, and zonisamide and eslicarbazepine in adults only. Except for clobazam/desmethylclobazam, however, the drug levels did not change outside of the normally accepted range. In addition, adult participants in the study taking clobazam reported sedation more frequently.

Tests also showed that participants taking valproate and CBD had higher ALT and AST (liver function tests) compared with participants not taking valproate. Very high ALT and AST indicate abnormal liver function, but significant ALT and AST elevation occurred only in a mall number of participants (4 children and 1 adult), and the levels returned to normal after discontinuation of valproate and CBD.

“While the interaction between CBD and clobazam has been established in the literature, there are currently no published human data on CBD’s potential interactions with other seizure medications,” said Dr. Gaston. “However, given the open label and naturalistic follow-up design of this study, our findings will need to be confirmed under controlled conditions.”

The findings emphasize the importance of monitoring blood levels of antiepileptic drugs as well as liver function during treatment with CBD. “A perception exists that since CBD is plant based, that it is natural and safe; and while this may be mostly true, our study shows that CBD, just like other antiepileptic drugs, has interactions with other seizure drugs that patients and providers need to be aware of,” said Dr. Gaston.

Article: Interactions between cannabidiol and commonly used antiepileptic drugs, Tyler E. Gaston, E. Martina Bebin, Gary R. Cutter, Yuliang Liu, Jerzy P. Szaflarski, and for the UAB CBD Program, Epilepsia, doi: 10.1111/epi.13852, published online 6 August 2017.

Source: Compound derived from marijuana interacts with antiepileptic drugs

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[BLOG POST] Top 50 Epilepsy Blogs & Websites on the Web – Seizure Blog

Top Epilepsy Blogs

Rank

Blog Name

Facebook Fans

Twitter Followers

Alexa Rank

1

Epilepsy Research UK

Epilepsy Research UK

epilepsyresearch.org.uk/news

London

About Blog – Epilepsy Research UK supports ground-breaking independent research into the causes, treatment and prevention of epilepsy to help change the future for people with this condition.
Frequency – about 2 posts per week

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17,126 7,371 1,775,877
2

EpilepsyU

EpilepsyU

epilepsyu.com

About Blog – Epilepsy U was created with YOU in mind. A place to meet and a place to learn about the nation’s number one neurological disorder, epilepsy.
Frequency – about 4 posts per week

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35,201 3,647 2,388,104
3

Epilepsy News Today

Epilepsy News Today

epilepsynewstoday.com

About Blog – Epilepsy News Today is a digital platform providing daily updates on research, science and advice news for Epilepsy patients and caregivers.
Frequency – about 2 posts per week

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190 43 5,154,651
4

Neurology Times | Epilepsy and Seizure

Neurology Times | Epilepsy and Seizure

neurologytimes.com/epilepsy-..

About Blog – An authoritative, timely resource for clinicians on common neurological disorders, including epilepsy and seizure, and more. Neurology Times offers easy-to-read, up-to-date research and clinical guidance for neurologists and other clinicians caring for patients with neurological disorders.
Frequency – about 4 posts per month

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2,055 1,682 1,057,158
5

ScienceDaily | Epilepsy Research News

ScienceDaily | Epilepsy Research News

sciencedaily.com/news/mind_b..

Rockville, MD

About Blog – Read the latest medical research on epilepsy and seizures including new treatments and potential cures under development.
Frequency – about 4 posts per month

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1,760,936 211,698 4,818
6

Medical News Today | Epilepsy News

Medical News Today | Epilepsy News

medicalnewstoday.com/categor..

United States

About Blog – Epilepsy is relatively common – it is a group of disorders that involve recurrent seizures. Epilepsy can start at any age, but it mostly begins during childhood. Treatment involves using epilepsy drugs to control seizures. In rare cases, surgery may be used to either remove a specific area of the brain that is affected, or install an electrical device to assist in controlling seizures.
Frequency – about 3 posts per month

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7

nature.com | Epilepsy

nature.com | Epilepsy

nature.com/subjects/epilepsy

London

About Blog – Latest news and research from Nature.com on the topic of Epilepsy. Nature Research is a portfolio of high quality products and services across the life, physical, chemical and applied sciences, including journals, online databases and researcher services, which are dedicated to serving the scientific community.
Frequency – about 2 posts per week

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8

News Medical | Epilepsy News

News Medical | Epilepsy News

news-medical.net/?tag=/epilepsy

About Blog – News-Medical.Net aims to segment, profile and distribute medical news to the widest possible audience of potential beneficiaries worldwide and to provide a forum for ideas, debate and learning, and to facilitate interaction between all parts of the medical health sciences community worldwide.
Frequency – about 4 posts per week

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266,779 11,564 16,620
9

Neuroscience News | Epilepsy

Neuroscience News | Epilepsy

neurosciencenews.com/neurosc..

Houston, TX

About Blog – Neuroscience News provides research news for neuroscience, neurology, psychology, brain science and cognitive sciences.
Frequency – about 1 posts per week

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10

Epilepsy Society

Epilepsy Society

epilepsysociety.org.uk/blog

UK

About Blog – We are the leading national epilepsy medical charity working for everyone affected by epilepsy. Our vision is a full life for everyone affected by epilepsy. We want everyone affected by epilepsy to have the best opportunity for a full life as free from seizures as possible.
Frequency – about 2 posts per month

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50,274 19,386 263,546
11

Living Well With Epilepsy

Living Well With Epilepsy

livingwellwithepilepsy.com/blog

Philly Area

About Blog – Living Well With Epilepsy is dedicated to supporting people with epilepsy, increasing epilepsy awareness and benefiting organizations that further epilepsy research.
Frequency – about 1 posts per week

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2,691 4,309 6,897,069
12

Epilepsy Action | Epilepsy information and advice

Epilepsy Action | Epilepsy information and advice

epilepsy.org.uk

Leeds, UK

About Blog – Epilepsy Action is the working name of British Epilepsy Association. We care about people with epilepsy and their families. We listen to them, we respond to their needs, we reflect their ambitions and we understand their lives.
Frequency – about 2 posts per week

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13

My Purple Friends

My Purple Friends

mypurplefriends.com

Lexington, KY

About Blog – We art My Purple Friends provide free education seminars in libraries, schools, public venue and places of employment. We utilize social media and the corporation’s website to provide facts, statistics and other related data on causes, current research and new treatment options. Our programs include helping patients locate Neurologist and Epileptologists in their area.
Frequency – about 2 posts per month

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14

The Epilepsy Network (TEN)

The Epilepsy Network (TEN)

theepilepsynetwork.com/news

United States

About Blog – The Epilepsy Network is a worldwide community of people with epilepsy, family and friends, uniting to share experiences, learn about epilepsy and more!
Frequency – about 1 posts per week

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15

Epilepsy South Central Ontario

Epilepsy South Central Ontario

epilepsysco.org

About Blog – Epilepsy South Central Ontario is a non-profit charitable organization that provides education, information and support to families and individuals. We are dedicated to improving the quality of life for persons living with epilepsy. Epilepsy South Central Ontario is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for people living with seizure disorders through counseling and support services.
Frequency – about 1 posts per week

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3,549 1,830 3,619,876
16

Epilepsy Foundation

Epilepsy Foundation

epilepsychicago.org

Chicago, IL

About Blog – The mission of the Epilepsy Foundation of Greater Chicago is to lead the fight to overcome the challenges of living with epilepsy and to accelerate therapies to stop seizures, find cures, and save lives.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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17

Epilepsy Talk

Epilepsy Talk

epilepsytalk.com

About Blog – Hi, I am Phyllis. I had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.
Frequency – about 2 posts per week

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RSC Blog

RSC Blog

rscdiagnosticservices.com/blog

Richardson, TX

About Blog – RSC Diagnostic Services delivers premier EEG solutions and state-of-the-art equipment specifically geared for the needs of physician practices and acute care facilities. We at RSC are committed to enhancing patients’ quality of care and improving the ability to diagnose and treat seizures and epilepsy.
Frequency – about 3 posts per week

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Beyond the Ion Channel | The ILAE Genetics Commission Blog

Beyond the Ion Channel | The ILAE Genetics Commission Blog

epilepsygenetics.net

Kiel, Germany

About Blog – Epilepsies or seizure disorders are common diseases of the brain. Many types of epilepsies have a genetic etiology. Finding these genes and characterizing them will lead to insights about the physiology of epilepsies and -hopefully- novel treatment options. In our blog “Beyond the Ion Channel”, we try to make our research more understandable, digestable and interpretable.
Frequency – about 2 posts per month

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KetoVie

KetoVie

ketovie.com/blog

About Blog – Families suffering with epilepsy or other disorders want their “everyday” back and to whatever degree they can get it. At KetoVie we provide safe, reliable, effective, and convenient ketogenic formulas for the dietary management of intractable epilepsy and low carbohydrate convenient ketogenic friendly foods.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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National Association of Epilepsy Centers

National Association of Epilepsy Centers

naec-epilepsy.org

About Blog – NAEC supports epilepsy centers in delivering quality comprehensive care to people with epilepsy, by setting standards of care, advocating for access to high quality epilepsy center services, and providing knowledge and resources to its member centers.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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Dealing with epilepsy

Dealing with epilepsy

codrinpo.com/category/blog

Namur, Belgium

About Blog – I’m Codrin and I write about epilepsy in my day-to-day life and more.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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Journal of Epilepsy Research

Journal of Epilepsy Research

j-epilepsy.org

About Blog – This journal is an official journal of the Korean Epilepsy society. This journal publishes research articles in epilepsy and epilepsy-related fields including clinical and basic researches.
Frequency – about 2 posts per month

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Gbm-em Foundation

Gbm-em Foundation

blog.gbm-em.org

About Blog – The Gabriel BEBONBECHEM Foundation for Epilepsy & Mental Wellbeing (GBF).
Frequency – about 2 posts per month

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Sahara Care Blog | Epilepsy

Sahara Care Blog | Epilepsy

blog.saharacare.com/category..

About Blog – Sahara care provider offering services for people with complex needs, learning disabilities and physical disabilities.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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Epilepsy Waikato Charitable Trust

Epilepsy Waikato Charitable Trust

ewct.org.nz/blog

About Blog – Epilepsy Waikato Charitable Trust comprises a trust board, staff, and members and their supporters. EWCT works collaboratively with clients, community groups, schools, and medical specialists.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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calvin’s story

calvin's story

calvinsstory.com

About Blog – Calvin’s Story is the blog I write about being the mother of my eight year old boy Calvin, who has intractable epilepsy. My mission is to increase epilepsy awareness, dispel the myths, promote understanding and inspire empathy, all in hope of a cure..
Frequency – about 3 posts per week

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EPILEPSY IS A BITCH

EPILEPSY IS A BITCH

epilepsyisabitch.co.uk/blog

About Blog – I am Torie. Growing up with epilepsy I had no-one to talk to about the condition. I had brain surgery in 2013 and my epilepsy is now SO much more controlled! This is a blog to enable those experiencing epilepsy to share their experiences, have a laugh, slag off the condition and educate the public.
Frequency – about 1 posts per week

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The Epilepsy Journey

The Epilepsy Journey

tiffanykairos.com

About Blog – I am a happily-ever-after wife, an Epilepsy Diagnosee, Advocate for Epilepsy Awareness through The Epilepsy Journey.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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Epilepsy, Pregnancy, Motherhood & Me

Epilepsy, Pregnancy, Motherhood & Me

fairyfaye1986.weebly.com

London, UK

About Blog – My names Faye, This is my story of Pregnancy, Motherhood & Epilepsy.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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Triangle Area- Epilepsy Parent Support Group

Triangle Area- Epilepsy Parent Support Group

triangleepilepsyparents.com/..

About Blog – This group is for supporting each other as parents of children with epilepsy. As a group we would like to raise awareness about epilepsy and how it effects our children and the family unit. And offer hope to those who are also navigating through life living with epilepsy.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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telmenow.com – Epilepsy

telmenow.com - Epilepsy

www.telmenow.com/category/e..

UK

About Blog – This website will provide a superb source of information through the inclusion of expert reviews, the latest news articles and blog posts, all with a clear focus on assistive technologies and the needs of the consumer regarding epilepsy.
Frequency – about 2 posts per month

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Insights Into Epilepsy

Insights Into Epilepsy

insightsintoepilepsy.org

Cleveland, Ohio

About Blog – The Epilepsy Association recognizes the unique needs of individuals with epilepsy. Epilepsy Association provides ongoing case management and counseling for individuals with epilepsy who struggle to maintain a stable living situation.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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In Megan’s Shoes

In Megan's Shoes

inmegansshoes.com

California, USA

About Blog – People can develop Epilepsy at any age, but I, myself, was diagnosed with Epilepsy in my first year of college.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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Seizure Clusters Connect

Seizure Clusters Connect

seizureclustersconnect.com/r..

About Blog – Seizure Clusters Connect is a community of support that provides education and resources for individuals affected by seizure clusters.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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Friendz 4 Comfort

Friendz 4 Comfort

friendz4comfort.com

About Blog – Having a disability is something no one wants to deal with, but we have to realize that we are not alone. Having epilepsy myself, I have found it very useful to talk to people who have epilepsy too. It gives me a sense of comfort that my family cannot.
Frequency – about 2 posts per month

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Changing Focus: Epilepsy

Changing Focus: Epilepsy

cf-epilepsy.com

Dallas, TX

About Blog – Founder Whitney Petit was diagnosed with epilepsy as an infant. Now an adult living with the neurological condition, she shares her journey through blogging and photos. Giving advice and support, she lets the world know you can achieve anything while living with epilepsy.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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Epilepsy Dad

Epilepsy Dad

epilepsydad.com

Philadelphia, PA

About Blog – This blog provides me with an outlet for the thoughts and emotions that I imagine are common for parents of epileptic kids or parents of children with any disability. I wanted to share my experiences because I’m hoping my words will help other people going through the same thing so they know that they are not alone.
Frequency – about 3 posts per month

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Finding Freedom with Epilepsy

Finding Freedom with Epilepsy

findingfreedomwithepilepsy.w..

About Blog – Freya is the founder of Finding Freedom with Epilepsy. A blog supporting those dealing directly and indirectly with epilepsy in their bid to find freedom with the condition.
Frequency – about 1 posts per week

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Epilepsy Foundation

Epilepsy Foundation

epilepsyfoundation.org.nz

About Blog – The Epilepsy Foundation of NZ Inc provides information and support to people with epilepsy and their families.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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Living with Epilepsy

Living with Epilepsy

httpmariabracale.blog/blog

Block Island, Rhode Island

About Blog – My name is Maria. I welcome you to my blog on “Living with Epilepsy” “let’s talk about it”. We can only learn from one another and the story we carry deep inside our soul.
Frequency – about 2 posts per week

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Seizure & Epilepsy | Seize Lifes Moments

Seizure & Epilepsy | Seize Lifes Moments

seizelifesmoments.com

San Diego, CA

About Blog – Hi, I’m Melissa. A life enthusiast and an Epilepsy Advocate! I was 25 years old when I was diagnosed with Epilepsy. This is where I document my journey and hope to inspire you to support Epilepsy and how to “seize life’s moments”.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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De Morbo Sacro

De Morbo Sacro

demorbosacro.com

Toronto, Ontario

About Blog – The adventures of a non-medical doctor “of something” with refractory epilepsy.
Frequency – about 2 posts per week

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Our Purple Elephant

Our Purple Elephant

ourpurpleelephant.com

About Blog – My name is Dodie. Epilepsy has affected so many life choices, big and small. This blog is a place for me to share our experiences, our choices, our emotions, and our story.
Frequency – about 3 posts per month

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The Epileptic Man

The Epileptic Man

epilepticman.com

Manchester, England

About Blog – My name is Joe Stevenson, I’m the writer around here and I’ve got epilepsy. Welcome to The Epileptic Man whether you’ve got epilepsy or not, you’re quite welcome to rest here while I tell you what this website is about.
Frequency – about 3 posts per month

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A Day in the Life of Reagan Leigh

A Day in the Life of Reagan Leigh

reaganleigh.blogspot.com

About Blog – Reagan had her first cluster of seizures. She was diagnosed at 6 months old with Infantile Spasms and 2 years later with Mitochondrial Disease. Life has been a roller coaster for us and our baby girl but we’ve been blessed with wonderful friends and family to help us though this!
Frequency – about 6 posts per week

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Madie’s World

Madie's World

madiesblog-jamie.blogspot.com

Connecticut, USA

About Blog – I am just a mom. A mom to a very special little girl who is my heart and soul. I try my best. Madie has been dealing with seizures since she was young. Doctors do not know the cause of her seizures. She is developmentally delayed and at 6 years old still unable to walk on her own…What the future hold no one knows. This is madies story and kinda mine too thanks for reading.
Frequency – about 2 posts per month

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Life at Full Volume

Life at Full Volume

lifeatfullvolume.net

About Blog – My name is Sita, and I am a 27 year old who wants to make a community for people living with epilepsy.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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Becoming a Mum… with Epilepsy

Becoming a Mum... with Epilepsy

becomingamumwithepilepsy.blo..

About Blog – My name is Clair. I have epilepsy, although it is reasonably well controlled it has not gone away, my very infrequant seizures impact on my everyday life. So I have got involved with the Epilepsy Action pregnancy campaign and written this blog in the hope it will help even just a few women.
Frequency – about 1 post per month

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Source: Top 50 Epilepsy Blogs & Websites on the Web | Seizure Blog

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 [WEB SITE] EpiWatch 

EpiWatch
CURE and Johns Hopkins have just launched an exciting opportunity for epilepsy patients to participate in the EpiWatch research study. Downloading EpiWatch for Apple Watch and iPhone can help patients manage epilepsy by tracking seizures, medications, and possible triggers and side effects. EpiWatch provides a dashboard allowing access to data that can be shared with a physician or caregivier, and can also send alerts to family members or caregivers to let them know when a user is tracking a seizure.
For more information about the EpiWatch study or to find out about your eligibility, please call Johns Hopkins at 443-287-3042.

Source: News from CURE: EpiWatch, NYCURE, Call for Proposals, Caregiver Survey, New CEO

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[WEB SITE] Doctors appear to have reached unexpected consensus in prescribing pediatric anti-seizure medications

July 19, 2017

The number of available anti-seizure medications has exploded in the past two decades, going from just a handful of medicines available in the 1990s to more than 20 now. Once the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves each new medicine based on trials in adults, it’s available for clinicians to prescribe off-label to all age groups. However, says William D. Gaillard, M.D., division chief of Child Neurology and Epilepsy, Neurophysiology and Critical Care Neurology at Children’s National Health System, trials that lead to FDA approval for adults do not provide any information about which medications are best for children.

“With so many medications and so little data,” Dr. Gaillard says, “one might think doctors would choose a wider variety of medicines when they prescribe to children with epilepsy.”

However, the results from a recent study by Dr. Gaillard and colleagues, published online in Pediatric Neurology on June 27, 2017, show otherwise. The study indicates that doctors in the United States appear to have reached an unexpected consensus about which medication to prescribe for their pediatric patients.

The study is part of a broader effort to collect data on the youngest epilepsy patients — those younger than 3 years old, the age at which epilepsy most often becomes evident. As part of this endeavor, researchers from 17 U.S. pediatric epilepsy centers enrolled in the study 495 children younger than 36 months old who had been newly diagnosed with non-syndromic epilepsy (a condition not linked to any of the commonly recognized genetic epilepsy syndromes).

The researchers mined these patients’ electronic medical records for information about their demographics, disease and treatments. About half of the study participants were younger than 1 year old when they were diagnosed with epilepsy. About half had disease marked by focal features, meaning that their epilepsy appeared to originate from a particular place in the brain. Nearly all were treated with a single medication, as opposed to a cocktail of multiple medicines.

Of those treated with a single medication, nearly all were treated with one of five medicines: Levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, topiramate and zonisamide. However, the data showed a clear prescribing preference. About 63 percent of the patients were prescribed levetiracetam as a first choice. By contrast, oxcarbazepine and phenobarbital, the next most frequently prescribed medicines, were taken by patients as a first choice by a mere 14 percent and 13 percent respectively.

Even more striking, of the children who were not prescribed levetiracetam initially but required a second medication due to inadequate efficacy or unacceptable side effects, 62 percent also received this medication. That made levetiracetam the first or second choice for about 74 percent of all the children in the study, despite the availability of more than 20 anti-seizure medications.

It’s not clear why levetiracetam is such a frequent choice in the United States, says Dr. Gaillard. However, in its favor, the drug is available in a liquid formulation, causes no ill effects medically and can be started intravenously if necessary. Studies have shown that it appears to be effective in controlling seizures in about 40 percent of infants.

Yet, levetiracetam’s market dominance appears to be a North American phenomenon, the study authors write. A recent international survey that Dr. Gaillard also participated in suggests that outside of this continent, carbazepine and oxcarbazepine were the most frequently prescribed medications to treat focal seizures.

What’s really necessary, Dr. Gaillard says, is real data on efficacy for each of the medications commonly prescribed to pediatric epilepsy patients–a marked vacuum in research that prevents doctors from using evidence-based reasoning when making medication choices.

“This study identifies current practices, but whether those practices are correct is a separate question,” he explains. “Just because a medication is used commonly doesn’t mean it is the best medication we should be using.”

To answer that question, he says, researchers will need to perform a head-to-head clinical trial comparing the top available epilepsy medications in children. This study sets the stage for such a trial by identifying which medications should be included.

“Uncontrolled pediatric epilepsy can have serious consequences, from potential problems in development to a higher risk of death,” Dr. Gaillard says. “You want to use the optimal medicine to treat the disease.”

Source: Doctors appear to have reached unexpected consensus in prescribing pediatric anti-seizure medications

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[WEB SITE] Research provides insights for why some epilepsy patients continue to experience postoperative seizures

New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Brain, has highlighted the potential reasons why many patients with severe epilepsy still continue to experience seizures even after surgery.

Epilepsy continues to be a serious health problem and is the most common serious neurological disorder. Medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains the most frequent neurosurgically treated epilepsy disorder.

Many people with this condition will undergo a temporal lobe resection which is a surgery performed on the brain to control seizures. In this procedure, brain tissue in the temporal lobe is resected, or cut away, to remove the seizure focus.

Unfortunately, approximately one in every two patients with TLE will not be rendered completely seizure free after temporal lobe surgery, and the reasons underlying persistent postoperative seizures have not been resolved.

Reliable biomarkers

Understanding the reasons why so many patients continue to experience postoperative seizures, and identifying reliable biomarkers to predict who will continue to experience seizures, are crucial clinical and scientific research endeavours.

Researchers from the University’s Institute of Translational Medicine, led by Neuroimaging Lead Dr Simon Keller and collaborating with Medical University Bonn (Germany), Medical University of South Carolina (USA) and King’s College London, performed a comprehensive diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study in patients with TLE who were scanned preoperatively, postoperatively and assessed for postoperative seizure outcome.

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a MRI-based neuroimaging technique that provides insights into brain network connectivity.

The results of these scans allowed the researchers to examine regional tissue characteristics along the length of temporal lobe white matter tract bundles. White matter is mainly composed of axons of nerve cells, which form connections between various grey matter areas of the brain, and carry nerve impulses between neurons allowing communication between different brain regions.

Through their analysis the researchers could determine how abnormal the white matter tracts were before surgery and how the extent of resection had affected each tract from the postoperative MRI scans.

Surgery outcomes

The researchers identified preoperative abnormalities of two temporal lobe white matter tracts that are not included in standardised temporal lobe surgery in patients who had postoperative seizures but not in patients with no seizures after surgery.

The two tracts were in the ‘fornix’ area on the same side as surgery, and in the white matter of the ‘parahippocampal’ region on the opposite side of the brain.

The tissue characteristics of these white matter tracts enabled researchers to correctly identify those likely to have further seizures in 84% of cases (sensitivity) and those unlikely to have further seizures in 89% of cases (specificity). This is significantly greater than current estimates.

The researchers also found that a particular temporal lobe white matter tract called the ‘uncinate fasciculus’ was abnormal – and potentially involved in the generation of seizures – in patients with excellent and suboptimal postoperative outcomes.

However, it was found that significantly more of this tract was surgically resected/removed in the patients with an excellent outcome.

New insights

Dr Simon Keller, said: “There is scarce information on the prediction of postoperative seizure outcome using preoperative imaging technology, and this study is the first to rigorously investigate the tissue characteristics of temporal lobe white matter tracts with respect to future seizure classifications.

“Although there is some way to go before this kind of data can influence routine clinical practice, these results may have the potential to be developed into imaging prognostic markers of postoperative outcome and provide new insights for why some patients with temporal lobe epilepsy continue to experience postoperative seizures.”

Source: Research provides insights for why some epilepsy patients continue to experience postoperative seizures

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[WEB SITE] Brain surgery helps remove scar tissue causing seizures in epilepsy patients

By the time epilepsy patient Erika Fleck came to Loyola Medicine for a second opinion, she was having three or four seizures a week and hadn’t been able to drive her two young children for five years.

“It was no way to live,” she said.

Loyola epileptologist Jorge Asconapé, MD, recommended surgery to remove scar tissue in her brain that was triggering the seizures. Neurosurgeon Douglas Anderson, MD, performed the surgery, called an amygdalohippocampectomy. Ms. Fleck hasn’t had a single seizure in the more than three years since her surgery.

“I’ve got my life back,” she said. “I left my seizures at Loyola.”

Surgery can be an option for a minority of patients who do not respond to medications or other treatments and have epileptic scar tissue that can be removed safely. In 60 to 70 percent of surgery patients, seizures are completely eliminated, and the success rate likely will improve as imaging and surgical techniques improve, Dr. Anderson said.

Traditionally, patients would have to try several medications with poor results for years or decades before being considered for surgery, according to the Epilepsy Foundation. “More recently, surgery is being considered sooner,” the foundation said. “Studies have shown that the earlier surgery is performed, the better the outcome.” (Ms. Fleck is a service coordinator for the Epilepsy Foundation North/Central Illinois Iowa and Nebraska.)

Dr. Asconapé said Ms. Fleck was a perfect candidate for surgery because the scar tissue causing her seizures was located in an area of the brain that could be removed without damaging critical structures.

Ms. Fleck experienced complex partial seizures, characterized by a deep stare, unresponsiveness and loss of control for a minute or two. An MRI found the cause: A small area of scar tissue in a structure of the brain called the hippocampus. The subtle lesion had been overlooked at another center.

Epilepsy surgery takes about three hours, and patients typically are in the hospital for two or three days. Like all surgery, epilepsy surgery entails risks, including infection, hemorrhage, injury to other parts of the brain and slight personality changes. But such complications are rare, and they pose less risk to patients than the risk of being injured during seizures, Dr. Asconapé said.

Loyola has been designated a Level Four Epilepsy Center by the National Association of Epilepsy Centers. Level Four is the highest level of specialized epilepsy care available. Level Four centers have the professional expertise and facilities to provide the highest level of medical and surgical evaluation and treatment for patients with complex epilepsy.

Loyola’s comprehensive, multidisciplinary Epilepsy Center offers a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to epilepsy and seizure disorders for adults and children as young as two years old. Pediatric and adult epileptologist consultation and state-of-the-art neuroimaging and electrodiagnostic technology are used to identify and assess complex seizure disorders by short- and long-term monitoring.

Source: Loyola University Health System

Source: Brain surgery helps remove scar tissue causing seizures in epilepsy patients

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