Posts Tagged self-efficacy

[Abstract] Self-efficacy and Reach Performance in Individuals With Mild Motor Impairment Due to Stroke

Background: Persistent deficits in arm function are common after stroke. An improved understanding of the factors that contribute to the performance of skilled arm movements is needed. One such factor may be self-efficacy (SE).

Objective: To determine the level of SE for skilled, goal-directed reach actions in individuals with mild motor impairment after stroke and whether SE for reach performance correlated with actual reach performance.

Methods: A total of 20 individuals with chronic stroke (months poststroke: mean 58.1 ± 38.8) and mild motor impairment (upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer [FM] motor score: mean 53.2, range 39 to 66) and 6 age-matched controls reached to targets presented in 2 directions (ipsilateral, contralateral). Prior to each block (24 reach trials), individuals rated their confidence on reaching to targets accurately and quickly on a scale that ranged from 0 (not very confident) to 10 (very confident).

Results: Overall reach performance was slower and less accurate in the more-affected arm compared with both the less-affected arm and controls. SE for both reach speed and reach accuracy was lower for the more-affected arm compared with the less-affected arm. For reaches with the more-affected arm, SE for reach speed and age significantly predicted movement time to ipsilateral targets (R2 = 0.352), whereas SE for reach accuracy and FM motor score significantly predicted end point error to contralateral targets (R2 = 0.291).

Conclusions: SE relates to measures of reach control and may serve as a target for interventions to improve proximal arm control after stroke.

via Self-efficacy and Reach Performance in Individuals With Mild Motor Impairment Due to Stroke – Jill Campbell Stewart, Rebecca Lewthwaite, Janelle Rocktashel, Carolee J. Winstein, 2019

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[Abstract] Functional independence after acquired brain injury: Prospective effects of health self-efficacy and cognitive impairment.

Abstract

Objective: To examine how health self-efficacy and cognitive impairment severity relate to functional independence after acquired brain injury (ABI).

Design: Observational. Setting: Outpatient rehabilitation hospital.

Participants: Seventy-five adults with predominately stroke or traumatic brain injury who were beginning a course of occupational therapy.

Main Measures: Health self-efficacy was assessed with the Self-Rated Abilities for Health Practices. Cognitive functioning was assessed via a composite z score of neuropsychological tests. Trait affectivity was assessed with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. Functional independence was assessed with the Barthel Index and Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale.

Results: Health self-efficacy correlated moderately with functional independence. A moderation threshold effect was detected that revealed for whom health self-efficacy predicted functional independence. Among participants with normal to mildly impaired cognition (>−2 z cognitive composite), health self-efficacy correlated positively with functional independence, which held after accounting for trait affectivity. In contrast, health self-efficacy was not correlated with functional independence among participants with greater impairment (<−2 z cognitive composite).

Conclusions: Health self-efficacy predicts functional independence and may serve as a protective factor after ABI among individuals with relatively intact cognition. However, health self-efficacy does not predict functional independence among individuals with moderate or severe cognitive impairment, possibly due to limited self-awareness.

This study extends the literature linking health self-efficacy with rehabilitation outcomes and reinforces the need for promoting self-management in ABI. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)

via PsycNET Record Display – PsycNET

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[Abstract] A study of the influence of cognitive complaints, cognitive performance and symptoms of anxiety and depression on self-efficacy in patients with acquired brain injury

Abstract

Objective:
To examine the relationship between self-efficacy for managing brain injury–specific symptoms and cognitive performance, subjective cognitive complaints and anxiety and depression symptoms in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI).

Design:
Clinical cohort study.

Setting:
General hospitals, rehabilitation centres.

Subjects:
A total of 122 patients with newly ABI (mean age = 54.4 years (SD, 12.2)) were assessed at discharge home from inpatient neurorehabilitation or at start of outpatient neurorehabilitation after discharge home from acute hospital. Mean time since injury was 14.1 weeks (SD, 8.6).

Main measures:
Self-efficacy was measured using the Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (SEsx), mean score = 82.9 (SD, 21.8). Objective cognitive performance was measured with the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), mean z-score = −1.36 (SD, 1.31). Anxiety and depression symptoms were measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), cognitive complaints with the self-rating form of the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX-P).

Results:
Higher levels of subjective cognitive complaints and higher levels of anxiety and depression symptoms were significantly associated with lower self-efficacy (β = −0.35; P = .001 and β =−0.43; P < .001, respectively). Objective cognitive performance was not significantly associated with self-efficacy (β = 0.04, P = .53). DEX-P scores accounted for 42% and HADS scores for 7% of the total 57% variance explained. Objective cognitive performance did not correlate significantly with subjective cognitive complaints (r = −.13, P = .16).

Conclusion:
Control over interfering emotions and mastery over brain injury–associated symptoms seems important in the development of self-efficacy for managing brain injury–specific symptoms.

via A study of the influence of cognitive complaints, cognitive performance and symptoms of anxiety and depression on self-efficacy in patients with acquired brain injury – Ingrid MH Brands, Inge Verlinden, Gerard M Ribbers, 2018

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[Abstract] Providing Sources of Self-Efficacy Through Technology Enhanced Post-Stroke Rehabilitation in the Home.

Abstract

This research explores the impact of receiving feedback through a Personalised Self-Managed Rehabilitation System (PSMrS) for home-based post-stroke rehabilitation on the users’ self-efficacy; more specifically, mastery experiences and the interpretation of biomechanical data. Embedded within a realistic evaluation methodological approach, exploring the promotion of self-efficacy from the utilisation of computer-based technology to facilitate post-stroke upper-limb rehabilitation in the home included; semi-structured interviews, quantitative user data (activity and usage), observations and field notes. Data revealed that self-efficacy was linked with obtaining positive knowledge of results feedback. Encouragingly, this also transferred to functional activities such as, confidence to carry out kitchen tasks and bathroom personal activities. Findings suggest the PSMrS was able to provide key sources of self-efficacy by providing feedback which translated key biomechanical data to the users. Users could interpret and understand their performance, gain a sense of mastery and build their confidence which in some instances led to increased confidence to carry out functional activities. However, outcome expectations and socio-structural factors impacted on the self-efficacy associated with the use of the system. Increasing the understanding of how these factors promote or inhibit self-management and self-efficacy is therefore crucial to the successful adoption of technology solutions and promotion of self-efficacy.

Source: Providing Sources of Self-Efficacy Through Technology Enhanced Post-Stroke Rehabilitation in the Home. – PubMed – NCBI

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[Poster] Improved Motor Recovery, Gait Speed, and Gait Parameters Following Backwards Walking Training in an Individual Post Chronic Stroke

Source: Improved Motor Recovery, Gait Speed, and Gait Parameters Following Backwards Walking Training in an Individual Post Chronic Stroke – Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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[WEB SITE] Online Patient Platform Improves Epilepsy Self-Management

Patients with epilepsy who participated in an online patient community showed improved ability to manage their condition well by making good medical decisions, according to a new study.

The study, published in the July 14 issue of Neurology, showed that patients with epilepsy taking part in the “Patients Like Me” online platform had improvements in “self-management” and “self-efficacy” of their condition.

Lead author, John D. Hixson, MD, University of California–San Francisco, explained to Medscape Medical News that these endpoints measured whether patients were making good decisions about how they managed their condition.

“Self-efficacy measures whether a patient knows the right thing to do, while self-management measures what the patient actually does. We chose these endpoints as they are validated metrics that reflect well what the online platform is suppose to deliver — helping patients manage their condition themselves.”

He pointed out that “Patients Like Me” is one of several online patient platforms available. These platforms are typically rooted in social media and allow patients to communicate with each other on forums. They also have educational videos and specific tools for tracking frequency and severity of seizures and recording medication side effects.

“This was a real-world study. It is the first study to do a rigorous assessment of this type of platform using validated measures,” Dr Hixson said.

Continue —> Online Patient Platform Improves Epilepsy Self-Management.

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