Posts Tagged sensor glove

[ARTICLE] Interactive Design and Development of Real Arm Movements for Application in Rehabilitation – Full Text PDF

Abstract

An interactive real arm movements for application in rehabilitation is designed and
developed. The aim is to encourage hand paralysis patients performing their physical therapy by introducing games application in replacing conventional hand therapy module and methods. In this project, the accelerometer is used for tracking the orientation of the arm. As the arm moves, the values from x, y and z axis from the accelerometer changes and are being read by the Analog Inputs of the Arduino Board. After being read by the Analog Inputs of the Arduino Board, the 3D model moves as well. Solidworks software was used to modeled the hand in which the data is then transferred to Matlab/Simulink using SimMechanicalLink from Mathworks. Lastly, the sensor glove was programmed to work as a controller of games application in hand rehabilitation thus makes it an enjoyable therapy process. […]

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[Abstract+References] Cortical and functional responses to an early protocol of sensory re-education of the hand using audio–tactile interaction.

Early sensory re-education techniques are important strategies associated with cortical hand area preservation. The aim of this study was to investigate early cortical responses, sensory function outcomes and disability in patients treated with an early protocol of sensory re-education of the hand using an audio-tactile interaction device with a sensor glove model.

After surgical repair of median and/or ulnar nerves, participants received either early sensory re-education twice a week with the sensor glove during three months or no specific sensory training. Both groups underwent standard rehabilitation. Patients were assessed at one, three and six months after surgery on training-related cortical responses by functional magnetic resonance imaging, sensory thresholds, discriminative touch and disability using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand patient-reported questionnaire.

At six-months, there were no statistically significant differences in sensory function between groups. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, trained patients presented complex cortical responses to auditory stimulation indicating an effective connectivity between the cortical hand map and associative areas.

Training with the sensor glove model seems to provide some type of early cortical audio-tactile interaction in patients with sensory impairment at the hand after nerve injury. Although no differences were observed between groups related to sensory function and disability at the intermediate phase of peripheral reinnervation, this study suggests that an early sensory intervention by sensory substitution could be an option to enhance the response on cortical reorganization after nerve repair in the hand. Longer follow-up and an adequately powered trial is needed to confirm our findings.

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via Cortical and functional responses to an early protocol of sensory re-education of the hand using audio–tactile interactionHand Therapy – Raquel Metzker Mendes, Carlo Rondinoni, Marisa de Cássia Registro Fonseca, Rafael Inácio Barbosa, Carlos Ernesto Garrido Salmón, Cláudio Henrique Barbieri, Nilton Mazzer, 2017

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[ARTICLE] MoMiReS: Mobile mixed reality system for physical & occupational therapies for hand and wrist ailments

The MoMiReS is a mobile mixed reality system aimed at physical and occupational therapies. The goal of the system is to engage therapy patients by involving them in a fun to play 3D game environment through physical interactions with a wireless sensor glove. Our system offers a solution for rehabilitation of the hand, wrist originated problems with a smartphone based mobile mixed reality game that will be used in conjunction with traditional rehabilitation programs such as home treatment.

The key factor in the success of the home treatment is compliance of patients to the given therapy instructions. However, therapists report that patients do not carry on their home-exercises and activities. The main reason is the lack of motivation and boredom for the given activities. These activities require patients to carry out set of repetitive movements. The lack of motivation in exercises causes discontinuity and increases the recovery time and eventually increases the cost of the treatment.

Therefore, we propose a complete framework by reducing the drawbacks of the traditional therapy. Our framework has three components; hardware, smartphone game, and cloud for data storage and processing. A sensor glove was developed with plug and play motion sensors streamed in real-time to the mobile phone with Bluetooth connection. The glove is used for tracking finger pressures and motion of the fingers. The patient side smartphone based interactive game verifies compliance of the motions for assigned exercises by occupational/physical therapist. The cloud side aims at ensuring patients that the assigned exercises are carried out and also monitors patient in real-time. Cloud application keeps the record of the patients’ progresses for further analysis by therapists.

In order to understand the effectiveness of the proposed system, we developed games specifically for treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. The usability and effectiveness of the systems are surveyed among the occupational – herapy students. Survey results show that 92% approval rate of the system.

via IEEE Xplore Abstract (Abstract) – MoMiReS: Mobile mixed reality system for physical & occupational therapies for hand and wrist ai….

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