Posts Tagged sensory overload

[BLOG POST] 21 People Explain What Sensory Overload Feels Like – The Mighty

 

Sensory overload happens when too much sensory stimulus is occurring at once — it can be triggered by a crowded room, a TV turned up too loud, strong aromas, fluorescent lighting — or a hundred other things. It’s often associated with certain diagnoses like autism, sensory processing disorderchronic fatigue syndromefibromyalgiapost-traumatic stress disorder and more, although anyone can experience it.

Sensory overload can be overwhelming, scary and exhausting, and may require a person to separate him or herself from a situation, perform a calming ritual or in some cases, melt down. It’s a hard experience to understand unless you’ve felt it. So, we asked our readers who’ve experienced sensory overload to describe what it’s like.

This is what they had to say:

1. “Do you remember the movie ‘Bruce Almighty’? He was receiving prayer requests by hearing them in his head as they occurred, hundreds at a time. They became jumbled, and he became frustrated and couldn’t make sense of any of them. Sensory overload is like that. Everything is coming at me at once, but it seems I’m the only one noticing. I can hear my heartbeat, I can feel the heat of the lamps, I can’t function. I’m frozen, stuck. It usually takes a shock to get me back from this, like a touch if I’m not being touched, or a change of environment or cold water on my skin.” — Meredith Lime

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2. “Sometimes it just feels like you need everything around you to pause… It’s like a bunch of things occurring while a bunch of other things are approaching at the same time — like a spinning room.” — TwoMlln Thghts AndCntg

3. “During an auditory overload, just about every sound can feel like someone took a microphone to it and set it on full blast.” — Chelle Neufeld

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4. “I hear everything when in sensory overload. But it’s not as if I can hear what is being said; rather it is just many, many sounds, unfiltered and loud. It feels like sounds are coming at me from every direction. Lights from all directions also seem to glare in my eyes. Sensory overload is horrible.” — Laura Seil Ruszczyk

5. “It’s like when your computer freezes because there are too many tasks open or a task is stuck. And your brain hits ‘Ctrl-Alt-Del’ automatically. In my case, this means sudden fatigue, balance problems, speaking problems, disorientation.” — Zahra Khan

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6. “Too much, noise, lights, sensation, all bombarding my body. [I] cannot stop feeling all of it and can’t shut it off… Your normal filters cease to work, you can’t stop hearing the sounds, talking, cars, etc., can’t stop seeing the lights, colors, can’t stop feeling it all so intensely.” — Susan Coughlin Broad

7. “I would explain it as walking into an amusement park with eight young kids on a hot summer day. Imagine all the senses you would be feeling at that time — hot, sticky, screaming kids all wanting to do different things, noises coming from all different places, music from all the rides, voices, babies crying, noises from all the rides.” — Frankie Hathaway

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8. “I hear both everything and nothing at the same time. It feels like you are surrounded by a circular wall and all the walls are folding in on themselves at once.” — Jana Young

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9. “Imagine walking into a room filled with 25 72-inch flat-screen TVs that all have super-high definition and surround sound, but they’re all playing different movies. On full blast. At the same time. And the door is locked, so you can’t get out. Feeling anxious? Now imagine getting the same reaction just from being at the grocery store and having to drive home with your infant in the backseat. Yeah, that’s what it’s like.” — Jenalyn Cloward Barton

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10. “It feels like being trapped on a merry-go-round. All the lights and sounds come and go so quickly you can’t make sense of any of it. You’re up and then you’re down. No matter what you can’t get off. You have to wait for the ride to be over.” — Hailey Remigio

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11. “Sensory overload for me is hearing sounds from all directions and wanting to jump out of my skin because of it. My worst experience involved a television show, rain and wind outside, my husband’s laughter and my son telling me he loved me. I was feeling the sounds in every inch of my body, and it physically hurt me. I felt as if I had hot pokers up and down my spine with cactuses being pushed into my palms with a side of sandpaper down my throat. The only relief came when I left the room for a few minutes to escape and decompress.” — Rea Ball

12. “Imagine being tied to the front of a freight train during a hurricane with an iPod on the highest volume of the most annoying song you know.” — Melanie Johanson

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13. “It feels as though I’m trapped and restricted in a glass case that I can’t escape, and the overwhelming fear and anxiety climbs up my body and throat in an almost suffocating way. All I can think to do is escape.” — Laura Spoerl

14. “Sensory overload feels like, for me, everything is crawling. My skin is crawling, noises feel like they are crawling in and out of my ears, blood is skittering out of my heart, air is crawling out of my lungs and racing up and down my throat.” — Janette Luyk Postma

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15. “It feels like my head is like a cup of hot water. My whole body starts to overheat, and every question from a co-worker, student or even the phone ringing is like more water being added to the cup. Obviously the cup starts to overflow, and I can’t take any more. I have to step away, get air, lean against a wall. And I never notice there is a problem brewing until it is too late.” — Virginia Wilson

16. “I tell people that it’s like taking a bite of cake, but, instead of simply enjoying the cake, your brain decides that it needs to identify every single ingredient/texture/flavor of the cake all at exactly the same moment. That’s what sensory overload is like for me — my brain picking apart the general ‘din’ into individual bits of stimuli while trying to process each bit individually all at exactly the same moment.” — Kristy Steele Rose

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17. “Imagine standing in the middle of a large dance floor, music blasting and dozens of people dancing wildly around you. Now imagine that the lights are being turned on and off with no pattern or warning at all. You glance through the crowd to find someone across the room who is waving at you and saying something to you, but you can’t hear them. You can tell from their gestures and their facial expression that what they’re saying is important, but you can’t focus long enough to grasp their words. Every emotion a person can have floods your mind — anger, fear, resentment, sadness, hopelessness. But your feet are glued to the dance floor. There’s no escape, and no one around you sees what you see — chaos and doom.” — Jill Toler

18. “It’s like being underwater at the beach while the waves wash away your thoughts. You’re struggling to catch a breath, but every time you are able to reach the surface, you are struck by another wave and you can’t organize a coherent thought. You can’t get on top of it and you start to panic.” — Sam Gee

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19. “Imagine opening a door, and through it you think will be a peaceful valley with rolling hills, trees, birds and not a soul around, but when you take that first step you are then falling down from an airplane with no parachute.” — Genevieve Geehan

20. “[It’s] like being inside a pinball machine.” — Ali Canellas Carlton

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21. “Every sense you have is already naturally exaggerated, and an overload is having every sense explode beyond anything tolerable. Every sound is a deafening explosion, every light like a flash of a bomb, every sense at the extreme. As a result your brain starts to panic, and all it acknowledges is the senses and how strong they are… It’s an incredibly painful experience and its something I have come to fear.” — Hallie Ervin

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via People Explain What Sensory Overload Feels Like | The Mighty

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[VIDEO] How to Reduce Sensory Overload – YouTube

People who experience difficulty processing sensory information, such as autistic people, those with sensory processing disorder SPD, or highly sensitive people can sometimes go into a state of sensory overload. Overload occurs when a person experiences too much sensory stimulation and cannot handle it all, like a computer trying to process too much data and overheating. This can happen when there’s a lot going on, like hearing people talk while a TV blares in the background, being surrounded in a crowd, or seeing lots of blinking screens or flashing lights. If you or someone you know is experiencing sensory overload, there are some things you can do to help reduce its effects.

 

 

 

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[BLOG POST] 10 Tips for Including People with Disabilities in Your Holiday Celebrations

10 Tips for Including People with Disabilities in your Holiday Celebration. Graphic of a tree in the snow. Logo for RespectAbility

With the holiday season upon us, it is easy to hold a gathering where all guests — with and without disabilities — feel welcomed, respected and have fun. All it takes is some planning. With some help from Alie Kriofske Mainella, an expert on working for inclusion of people with disabilities, here are some tips to ensure your gatherings are inclusive, thoughtful and welcoming to all.

1. Dont be afraid to include guests with disabilities.

People with disabilities have their disabilities 24/7, so they know how to create work-arounds so that they feel comfortable. If you know someone has a disability, use a simple strategy — ask the person what they need to be fully included. All too often people with disabilities are not invited to events, or dont go because they feel embarrassed to put someone out” by asking for a simple thing that will help them attend. By telling them that their presence is valued, and asking what they need, you will build a new level of trust and affection. For example, one of the biggest things that aging loved ones need is a ride. So help them find a carpool or send an accessible taxi or Uber to pick them up and return them home.

2. Include a line about disability accommodations in the RSVP.

Keep in mind that not all disabilities are visible, so you may not know that someone you want to include in your event has a disability. By including a line about accommodations and food allergies in the invitations RSVP, you are already letting guests know that everyone welcome. If its an event for children, parents can tell you, right off the bat, what their childs needs might be to attend the event. They will be happy you asked! We want everyone to have fun — please let us know if you have dietary restrictions or require other special accommodations to attend! We will do our best to meet special needs.” Note that you arent promising to meet all needs — if you cant find a sign language interpreter at the last minute or there is another issue, for example, you will be able to let your guest know in advance. Indeed, they may be able to help you find a solution!

3. Physical Access.

Most public places are accessible. However, because religious institutions are exempted from the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), many of them are not fully accessible. Thus, if your event is at a venue that is not physically accessible to all, move it to a place that is. That can mean a different room in a place of worship, or to a completely different place. Venues should have a ground level entrance or ramp, an elevator if its upstairs, and accessible bathrooms. Most public places (hotels, restaurants, bowling, video games, pools, bounce houses, etc.) are usually equipped for people with disabilities. Just check with the venue ahead of time. If you have someone coming who uses a wheelchair, you should also put the food on a table that is low enough for them so they can take it themselves.

4. Special Diets and Fragrance Allergies.

Anyone can have allergies, celiac disease or lactose intolerance, but you wont know unless you ask on the invitation RSVP. Making sure there is an option for cake, snacks, treats and other food for these guests can be as simple as picking up a gluten free cupcake to serve with the cake. It is thoughtful to have refreshments that everyone can enjoy and/or asking people not to wear perfume to your event.

5. Addressing attitude.

Kids and adults can be daunted when encountering someone who is different from them. If children are at the event, you can talk to them at the start of the event about kindness and respect for each other and each others differences. A holiday gathering is a great opportunity for kids to learn about one another.

6. Involving parents.

Holiday gatherings can be exhausting for the hosts. Asking a parent or two to volunteer to help out, particularly if its a big group, can lighten the load for the hosts. Parents may feel more comfortable, especially if their child has social anxiety issues, if they are invited to stay or help as an option.

7. Sensory overload awareness.

Holiday gatherings can cause sensory overload for any child or adult. But for a person with autism or a sensory processing disorder, a large gathering can be really overwhelming. Offer opportunities for guests to take a break, perhaps in a quiet room away from the crowd. Some venues may have options for turning down music or minimizing stimulation — and that is useful anywhere there are a lot of kids! Latex allergies (balloons) and chemical sensitivities (use of highly scented cleaners or staff wearing perfumes) are real issues. Solutions: Use alternative mylar balloons. Ask people to not wear strong scents, and choose unscented cleaning products. Avoid flashing lights that can trigger seizures in people with epilepsy.

8. Communication.

If a guest attending the gathering is non-verbal or communicates in other ways such as American Sign Language or a communication board, talk about it with the guests. Installing free Dragon software onto an iPad in advance can enable you to speak with someone who is deaf as it instantly transcribes what you are saying. Having an interpreter can be worth the cost, as all the people can communicate and maybe learn a little sign language! Remember to speak directly to a child or adult whether they are verbal or not.

9. Reading, Cognitive Access and Vision Issues.

Children and adults with cognitive, learning disabilities or vision impairments might not be able to read the menu, instructions for a scavenger hunt or a game score sheet. Pictures and verbal instructions are useful, as well as pairing children with those who can help. Its always great to have an extra pair of reading glasses around if you are inviting seniors. But you can always tell someone who cant see or read what they will need or what to know.

10. Enjoy the gathering!

Dont let inclusion stress you out. If you are reading this list and considering these tips, youre already doing more than most! Stay positive, smile and have a great time!

via 10 Tips for Including People with Disabilities in Your Holiday Celebrations – Respect Ability

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[BLOG POST] How To Cope with Sensory Overload after Brain Injury

How To Cope with Sensory Overload after Brain Injury

Sensory overload, also known as hypersensitivity, occurs when the brain’s filters no longer work properly. Unlike a healthy brain, which can identify and filter out irrelevant or unnecessary information, an injured brain often cannot.

As a result, normal, everyday stimuli can be uncomfortable, overwhelming, or unbearable. Sounds that before your injury were barely noticeable may be alarming and uncomfortable. Crowds may feel overwhelming. Clothing that was once comfortable may be irritating. Bright light can be distressing and might give you a headache.

Flooded is a word that is often used to describe the overstimulated brain. A brain that is flooded with information can shut down or freeze. It can become difficult or even impossible to continue a conversation or make a decision. Agitation and anxiety are common symptoms, but some may even experience panic attacks, nausea, or vomiting.

Hypersensitivity is more common after a mild brain injury, whereas people with severe brain injuries more often experience a loss of sensory function.

Types of Sensory Overload

Sensory overload can affect one, several, or all the senses.

  1. Sight (light intensity, light color)
  2. Sound
  3. Smell
  4. Touch (heat, cold, pressure)
  5. Taste
  6. Balance (movement, spatial awareness)

Factors that can Exacerbate Hypersensitivity

There are some factors that can stress your brain, lowering your ability to adapt to stimuli and exacerbating hypersensitivity. It is good to keep these in mind and plan accordingly.

  1. Fatigue
  2. Lack of sleep
  3. Pain
  4. Heat

Common Symptoms of Sensory Overload

  1. Fatigue
  2. Unable to think clearly
  3. Unable to respond/ feeling “frozen”
  4. Anxiety
  5. Agitation
  6. Panic attacks
  7. Difficulty breathing
  8. Migraine
  9. Nausea/vomiting

How to Deal with Sensory Overload

Common Triggers and Coping Suggestions

Note Hypersensitivity is not something that I personally deal with. If you feel that I have misrepresented any information please let me know. If you know other tips or strategies let that I have neglected to include let me know and I will promptly add them.

Light

  1. Try avoiding bright light and fluorescent lights
  2. Limit exposure to TV, phone, and computer screens
  3. Adjust electronics to display yellow light instead of blue light
  4. Wear sunglasses when needed, even indoors
  5. Wear syntonic light therapy glasses (see below)

Noise

  1. Limit time spent in noisy stores or at events
  2. Wear earplugs or noise cancelling earmuffs (see below)
  3. Ask family members to use headphones when listening to music or watching TV shows
  4. This may seem counter intuitive, but for some people adding quiet, calming background noise can help – sound machine, fan, or peaceful music
  5. When attending an event that you know will be taxing, plan to stay for a short time and/or plan time to rest afterwards
  6. If you feel a situation start to become overwhelming, excuse yourself to a quiet place like the bathroom, close your eyes, and take slow deep breaths

Crowds

  1. Go grocery shopping and run other errands early in the morning
  2. Eat at restaurants between meal times when they are less busy
  3. Plan time to rest after going out

How to Cope with Sensory Overload after Brain Injury - How To Brain

More General Coping Strategies

Planning

Plan any even that could potentially lead to overstimulation. You may need to plan time to rest before and after the event or plan to only stay for part of the event. Sometimes it may even be helpful to plan what you will do if things do not go as expected.

Make a grocery list before going shopping. If there is a chance that the store might not carry an item, consider if you will buy a substitute or go without.

If you are attending an event for the first time since your injury and do not know how it will affect you, explain this to the people joining you. When going to the movies, a concert, or a sporting event it may be a good idea to sit towards the back. It will be slightly less stimulating and you will be able to leave easily, if the need should arise.

Include other senses

Identify the stimuli that is bothering you and add in one that isn’t. For example, if a sound is bothersome try sucking on a peppermint or cinnamon candy. Or if a crowd is overwhelming squeezing a stress ball.

Syntonic light therapy glasses

I would love to get feedback from you guys on this one. Prior to researching for this post, I had not heard of syntonic therapy. But, if the claims made about it are true, it seems that many survivors could benefit from syntonic therapy.

Syntonic therapy glasses have colored lens. Depending on your symptoms, a certain color can be prescribed to alter signals the brain is sending and positively influence the vision system. They claim to be particularly beneficial for brain injury survivors, especially those suffering from light sensitivity and headaches.

If you are interested here is a little more information:

Explanation of Syntonic Therapy (article)
Explanation of Syntonic Therapy (short video)
Brain Injury Success Story

Musicians’ earplugs

I would suggest trying cheap foam ones from the grocery store first, as these seem to work well enough for most people. However, if you find that they do not block enough of the background noise, you can be prescribed custom earplugs by audiologist.

These custom earplugs are traditionally used by musicians but can be helpful for brain injury survivors with hypersensitivity to sound.  The article below explains the benefits of musicians’ earplugs over traditional earplugs for sound hypersensitivity resulting from brain injury.

Musicians’ Earplugs vs. Traditional Earplugs

Exposure

Try to slowly build up tolerance to the problematic stimuli. Though avoiding the stimulus entirely may be the most comfortable, doing so could increase your hypersensitivity to that stimulus overtime. When doing this pay close attention to your body and plan an “out” for yourself should you feel the need to rest.

Communication

You cannot expect family members, friends, and coworkers to know what you are going through if you have not told them. Let them know which stimuli are troublesome for you and what they can do to help – be as specific as possible.

What Can You do as a Loved One of a Survivor with Hypersensitivity?

The single biggest thing you can do is to be supportive. Ask your loved one what triggers sensory overwhelm for them and actively try to create an environment that is not overwhelming for them.

If they ask you to stop talking so that they can process what has already been said, listen to them. Do not continue talking until they are ready for you to do so.

When planning outings keep in mind that heat, pain, and lack of sleep can intensify hypersensitivity. Be understanding if they need to cut the outing short.

What coping strategies do you use to deal with hypersensitivity? 

How to Cope with Sensory Overload after Brain Injury - How To Brain

via How To Cope with Sensory Overload after Brain Injury – How To Brain

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[WEB SITE] Lost & Found: Caps, Sunglasses, and Earplugs – Strategies for Coping with Sensory Hypersensitivity – brainline.org

If it seems like your sense of touch, taste, smell, hearing, or vision is extra sensitive or heightened after your brain injury, it’s not your imagination. Sensory hypersensitivities are another major, yet not as obvious, contributor to fatigue and overload after brain injury. What we experience with our senses is essentially more information for our injured brains to try to process and organize. You can have difficulties processing sensory information just like any other information in your brain. Some examples of sensory hypersensitivities are:

  • Sounds that you barely noticed before are alarming and startle you.
  • It feels like you have megaphones in your ears.
  • Background sounds and stimulating environments become overwhelming.
  • Fluorescent and bright lights give you headaches.
  • Clothing that was comfortable before feels irritating now.
  • Large gatherings of people feel overwhelming.

Pain and fatigue can intensify sensory hypersensitivities, putting you in a hyper-sensitive or hyper-vigilant state. When you are in a hyper-sensitive or hyper-vigilant state, even subtle stimulants feel overwhelming. Especially sights and sounds that didn’t bother you before, may now trigger anxiety and the fight-or-flight response where your whole being feels threatened and out of control. You may shut down and not be able to do any more or you may feel compelled to escape from the situation. It can be very taxing, physically and mentally.

Stress management, movement and using all of your senses can help your brain organize and integrate the senses. This is similar to what children do. Consider how physically active children are as they grow and develop!

See Brain Recharging Breaks at the end of this chapter for some basic meditation techniques. Meanwhile, following are suggestions for coping with sensory hypersensitivities.

General Coping Suggestions

Limit exposure to avoid sensory overload.

  • Avoid crowds and chaotic places where there are a lot of stimuli, like shopping malls.
  • Do shopping and errands early in the week and early in the day, when stores are less crowded and quieter.
  • Shop in smaller, quieter stores when possible.
  • Eat out in restaurants when they are quieter, in between regular meal times.
  • Hold conversations in a quiet place.
  • Ask people to please speak one at a time. Explain that you’d really like to hear what everyone has to say but you can only hear one person at a time.
  • Sleep during car trips.
  • If you want to attend a function that you expect will be taxing, plan to stay only a short while. Take your cap, sunglasses and earplugs. Sit towards the back to minimize the sound and where you can easily exit to a quieter place or the car.

Monitor your pain, stress and fatigue levels.

Lights and sounds will bother you the most when you are stressed or fatigued. If you are feeling especially sensitive, use it as a cue that you need to take a break and use some relaxation techniques.

Try avoiding nicotine, caffeine and alcohol.

They may make the symptoms worse. If you have vertigo, try limiting your salt intake, which can cause fluid retention. Consider strengthening exercises for your neck with the guidance of a physical therapist.

When you are starting to feel stressed or anxious, try incorporating another sense.

  • Put something in your mouth to chew or suck on. Strong flavors like peppermint or cinnamon are especially effective.
  • Put on some soothing music.
  • Apply some deep pressure. Give yourself a hug or press your palms firmly together or on the table. Squeeze the steering wheel if you are driving the car.

Experiment with activities and alternative therapies that involve your senses.

Listen to music, experiment with movement, dance, yoga, water, art, aromatherapy, etc.

Challenge your sensitivities.

Gradually increase your exposure and tolerance when using earplugs, sunglasses, etc.
Don’t eliminate the senses completely or you set yourself up for super-sensitivity.

Specific Coping Strategies

Sensitivities to sound

  • Limit your exposure to noisy stores and loud situations like sporting events, the movie theatre and children’s school activities. Don’t participate or plan to stay for a limited amount of time. Sit on the outskirts so you can gracefully escape to a quieter place if needed.
  • Use earplugs, try different kinds, and carry them with you.
  • Use headphones for TV and music:
    • For others, when you don’t want to hear it.
    • For yourself, when you want to hear it better.
  • Minimize distractions from snacking while doing things like working in groups or playing games. Use bowls for food instead of eating directly from noisy bags.
  • Add some background sound – a fan, white noise machine, soothing music.
  • Remove yourself from the situation and go to a quieter place as soon as possible, even the bathroom, when you feel overwhelmed or anxious. Then try:
    • Closing your eyes
    • Taking slow deep stomach breaths
    • Putting an ice pack on your forehead and eyes
  • Gradually expose yourself to different sounds and louder sounds to increase your tolerances.

Sensitivities to light

  • Avoid bright light and fluorescent lights.
  • Use sunglasses or a cap with a brim, even indoors.
  • Try yellow tinted glasses if florescent lights are a problem.
  • Try polarized sunglasses if driving glare is a problem.
  • Try yellow tinted glasses if night driving is a problem.
  • Make sure you are getting plenty of vitamin A (but not too much!).
  • Eat orange colored fruits and vegetables like carrots, sweet potatoes, squash, and cantaloupe.
  • Take a moment to just close your eyes for a few minutes when you are starting to feel stressed or anxious. This blocks out the visual stimuli.

Sensitivities to touch, taste, and smell

  • Experiment! Cultivate an awareness of how things feel, taste and smell.
  • Rub different textures on your arms, increasing the intensity to gradually decrease sensitivities.
  • Add texture, contrasting temperatures and flavors to your food, like ice cream with crunchy nuts or chips with spicy taco sauce.
  • Notice the textures.
  • Pay attention to smells.
  • How do different aromas make you feel?

If your sense of smell is altered, make sure to have functioning smoke and gas detectors in your home.

Doing cognitive work

  • Plan to do cognitive work when your environment is quiet. Eliminate as many distractions and interruptions as possible.
  • Screen out distractions by using earplugs or headphones, playing soothing music, or using a fan or white noise machine if you have sensitivities to sound.
  • Turn down the volume on the phone and let the machine get it.
  • Work in an uncluttered space or use a three sided table screen, to help screen out visual distractions.
  • Give children headphones for the TV if you are having trouble screening it out.
  • Do your “thinking” work while children are in school or asleep.
  • Still having trouble concentrating? Try bringing in another sense.
    • Put on some soothing nature or instrumental music, something without words at a low volume.
    • Try chewing or sucking on something while you are working. Coffee stirrers can substitute for fingernails. Strong flavored or fizzy candies and gum can aid alertness.
    • Try using some deep pressure by giving yourself a hug, pressing your palms strongly against each other or on the table.
    • Try sitting on a large therapy ball while you work. A great strategy if you have trouble sitting still!
  • Take a physical break, every 15 min. at first. Resist the urge to push through. I know it feels counter-intuitive but taking breaks will actually help you work longer! Gradually you will find you can increase the time between breaks.
    • Use a timer – without a ticking sound!
    • Pause and stretch, drink some water or make a cup of tea, walk around the house or the yard, rock in a chair, walk the dog, pat the cat.

Visual Processing Problems

Vision is an extremely important and complex source of sensory information. What you see with your eyes travels through your brain to the back area of your brain, where it is processed in the occipital lobe. There is a lot of territory between the eyes and the back of the brain where an injury can occur. The occipital lobe may be damaged directly from impact to the back of the head or it may be damaged indirectly from the ricochet of the brain inside the skull when the front of the brain is impacted. Damage to the occipital lobe frequently occurs in car accidents, falls and sports injuries. Even subtle visual problems following a brain injury can have a significant impact on cognition and functioning.

I wish I had known about visual problems and visual therapy when I had my car accident. I thought I was really going crazy! Fortunately for me, my issues improved with time but not without mishaps, like falling off a curb!

Some common problems after a brain injury related to vision include:

  • Double vision
  • Trouble tracking words on a page
  • Impaired depth perception
  • Hypersensitivities to light
  • Difficulties remembering and recalling information that is seen
  • Difficulties “filling in the gaps” or completing a picture based on seeing only some of the parts
  • Trouble seeing objects to the side
  • Low tolerances to changing light or clutter
  • Impaired balance, bumping into objects
  • Feeling overwhelmed when there is a lot of visual stimuli

If you notice problems in areas related to visual processing, please consult a visual therapist or a neuroopthalmologist, they can help!

Tips:

  • Don’t eliminate any sense completely or you set yourself up for a super-sensitivity.
  • Gradually expose yourself to more light, sound, touch, smell, and taste.
  • Be patient, in many cases your sensory hypersensitivities will decrease in time!
  • Ask for physical therapy or occupational therapy with a therapist with a background in sensory integration for help with sensory sensitivities.

Some good news about sensory hypersensitivity is that it is also associated with a heightened sense of awareness and intuition. You may find that you feel more aware of your intuition and more creative since your brain injury. This is not uncommon. Enjoy!

Brain Recharging Breaks

If I had to choose one strategy that helped me the most after my brain injury, it would be learning to meditate. Meditation is especially helpful when you are experiencing sensory overload. It can help you calm yourself down from that hyper-sensitive state. It was also the only way I have found to give my brain a rest, to put it temporarily in a “cast”, like you would a broken limb. Often, after meditating for 15-20 minutes, the “logjam” in my brain clears up and I am somehow able to think again!

I recommend using some stress management or meditation techniques at least once a day. Plan it, schedule it in your planner, make it part of your daily routine. Meditation is not as mysterious as you might think. Try these basic steps:

  • Get in a comfortable position on the bed, in a recliner or even in the car; uncross your arms and legs. Cover yourself with a blanket if you are cool.
  • Close your eyes and do some slow deep breathing.
  • Slowly inhale, expanding your stomach and counting to 7.
  • Exhale gradually, contracting your stomach towards your spine, counting to 7.

Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.

When you are feeling more relaxed, as you continue your slow deep breathing, experiment with the following suggestions to increase the effectiveness of the experience.

Do a body scan checking for areas of pain or stress.

  • Eyes closed, inhale deeply, picture your forehead and notice any stress or pain.
  • Exhale and imagine the pain floating away with your exhale.
  • Inhale, picture your eyebrows and notice any stress or pain. Exhale and release it, imagining the stress floating away.
  • Repeat for your eyes, ears, jaw, throat, back of neck, shoulders … down to your toes. Breathe in relaxation, breathe out stress and pain.

Notice how you feel after you get to your toes!

  • Visualize or imagine yourself in a warm, secure, relaxing, happy, peaceful place; floating on a cloud, floating in the water, or recalling a happy memory.
    • Continue slow deep breathing.
  • Focus on a picture or artwork that you like, noticing each detail.
    • Continue slow deep breathing.
  • Listen to music, any music that is soothing to you. Nature sounds or instrumental music is a good place to start experimenting.
    • Continue slow deep breathing.
  • Use aromatherapy – any scent that smells good to you. Favorite scents are often from childhood memories!
    • Continue slow deep breathing.

Strive to let go of that never-ending tape of worries and “shoulds” that plays in your head. Focus on your senses – your breath, the music, a relaxing place, a comforting aroma. If thoughts drift in, gently push them away. It gets easier with practice, you’ll find what works best for you and you’ll be amazed at how much it helps you!

Excerpted from Lost & Found: A Survivor’s Guide for Reconstructing Life After a Brain Injury by Barbara J. Webster. © 20ll by Lash & Associates Publishing/Training Inc. Used with permission. Click here for more information about the book.

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