Posts Tagged sexual problems

[WEB SITE] Research Reports – Sexuality in individuals with traumatic brain injury and their partners – CNS

Neuropsychol Rehabil. 2016 Sep 28:1-10. [Epub ahead of print]

Downing M(1), Ponsford J(1).

Whilst previous research has detailed the impact of TBI on an individual’s
sexuality, few studies have investigated couples’ sexuality where one partner has sustained a TBI.

The study assessed sexual function in individuals with TBI and their partners. Fifty five individuals who had sustained TBI and their partners completed the Derogatis Interview for Sexual Function-Self Report (DISF-SR). All participants scored below the 50th percentile in relation to norms. Whilst participants with TBI obtained lower T-scores than partners on all subscales (except for sexual behaviour/experiences where scores were equivalent), as well as the total score, none of these differences was significant. Item analysis indicated that female participants with TBI reported significantly lower scores than female partners on frequency of having normal lubrication. Normative comparisons revealed that approximately one-third of individuals with TBI and one-fifth of their partners scored below the second percentile.

Given the high frequency of sexual problems in individuals with TBI, which also impact their partners, addressing sexual problems should be a priority in rehabilitation and beyond.

Source: Traumatic Brain Injury Resource Guide – Research Reports – Sexuality in individuals with traumatic brain injury and their partners

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[TEDx TALK/WEB SITE] A woman with a disability gets real about dating and sex. She’s funny and honest.

“So just recently I went out on a Match.com date, and it was fantastic,” begins Dr. Danielle Sheypuk in her TEDx Talk.

If you’ve ever been on a bunch of Match.com dates, that opening line might make you do a double take. How does one get so lucky?!

But don’t get too jealous. Things quickly went downhill two dates later, as most Match.com dates ultimately do. This time, however, the reason may not be something that you’ve ever experienced. Intrigued? I was too. So here’s the story.

Dr. Sheypuck is a pretty amazing woman.

She’s a licensed clinical psychologist, an advocate, and a model — among other things. She’s also been confined to a wheelchair since childhood. And that last fact is what did her recent date in.

On their third date over a romantic Italian dinner, Sheypuk noticed that he was sitting farther away from her than usual. And then, out of nowhere, he began to ask the following questions:

“I’ve been thinking, how are you gonna be a mother? How are you gonna do the duties that’s gonna be required of you? And even as wife — how … I’m not sure how this is gonna work.

“Used to this line of inquiry, she had the perfect quippy reply: “Well that’s simple: I’m just gonna hire someone like every other New Yorker.

“But despite her witty answer, he’d already made up his mind. She never heard from him again.

“I tried to convince myself that this was like any other relationship, but deep down I knew the reality. Who wants to date someone in a wheelchair?”

Dr. Sheypuk knows that that single question is evidence of a really serious problem —not just on the dating scene, but in society in general.

Society has factored out an entire group of potential romantic partners: people with disabilities.

In her words:

“We are completely left out of the dating picture. Society, media included, seems to ignore the fact that we have the same emotional needs and desires as everyone else. Is this injustice born out of the concept of the poster child and his or her duty to induce pity to raise money?

Or maybe it’s a conclusion drawn form mainstream porn where we have actors performing, like, gymnastic stunts with the stamina that none of us have of bucking broncos and jackrabbits.

“Um, yes. So much yes. She continues:


“The silent message: The more in shape your body, the better the sex. The unspoken conclusion: If you have a disability, you are too sick to have sex.


“Now let’s look at the continuum in our society where sexual is measured. On the one hand, we have humans that are the ultimate sex appeal object. So on that end, we have Victoria Secret models, Playboy centerfolds, people like that.

On the complete opposite end, we have people with physical disabilities. And it seems like the more we deviate from this ultimate sex icon, the more desexualized we become, the more taboo the topic, and the more damaging the consequences.

Now, for most people there are quick fixes, right? We have Hair Club for Men, Botox, Spanx, butt implants. But for people with disabilities, there are no quick fixes. There is no magic pill.”

“And we are hit hard.”

Watch the rest of Dr. Sheypuk’s talk to hear her important insights about what dating and relationships are like when a person has a disability — and how much of society is limiting itself.

She talks about a guy on Tinder who asked her if she was capable of having sex (her answer is funny), why people with disabilities can have sexual experiences that are even better than those of able-bodied folks, and more.

Source: A woman with a disability gets real about dating and sex. She’s funny and honest.

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[BROCHURE] Sexuality after Traumatic Brain Injury

Changes in sexual functioning are common after TBI. If you are experiencing sexual problems, there are things you can do to help resolve these problems. The information below describes common sexual problems after TBI and ways to improve sexual functioning.

How does a traumatic brain injury affect sexual functioning?

The following changes in sexual functioning can happen after TBI: ƒ

  • Decreased Desire: Many people may have less desire or interest in sex. ƒ
  • Increased Desire: Some people have increased interest in sex after TBI and may want to have sex more often than usual. Others may have difficulty controlling their sexual behavior. They may make sexual advances in inappropriate situations or make inappropriate sexual comments. ƒ
  • Decreased Arousal: Many people have difficulty becoming sexually aroused. This means that they may be interested in sex, but their bodies do not respond. Men may have difficulty getting or keeping an erection. Women may have decreased vaginal lubrication (moisture in the vagina). ƒ
  • Difficulty or Inability to Reach Orgasm/Climax: Both men and women may have difficulty reaching orgasm or climax. They may not feel physically satisfied after sexual activity. ƒ
  • Reproductive Changes: Women may experience irregular menstrual cycles or periods. Sometimes, periods may not occur for weeks or months after injury. They may also have trouble getting pregnant. Men may have decreased sperm production and may have difficulty getting a woman pregnant.

What causes changes in sexual functioning after TBI?

more?? –> Get Broshure

 

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