Posts Tagged smart technologies

[Abstract] A systematic review of personal smart technologies used to improve outcomes in adults with acquired brain injuries

This review aimed to determine the effectiveness of personal smart technologies on outcomes in adults with acquired brain injury.

A systematic literature search was conducted on 30 May 2019. Twelve electronic databases, grey literature databases, PROSPERO, reference list and author citations were searched.

Randomised controlled trials were included if personal smart technology was used to improve independence, goal attainment/function, fatigue or quality of life in adults with acquired brain injury. Data were extracted using a bespoke form and the TIDieR checklist. Studies were graded using the PEDro scale to assess quality of reporting. Meta-analysis was conducted across four studies.

Six studies met the inclusion criteria, generating a total of 244 participants. All studies were of high quality (PEDro ⩾ 6). Interventions included personal digital assistant, smartphone app, mobile phone messaging, Neuropage and an iPad. Reporting of intervention tailoring for individual needs was inconsistent. All studies measured goal attainment/function but none measured independence or fatigue. One study (n = 42) reported a significant increase in memory-specific goal attainment (p = 0.0001) and retrospective memory function (p = 0.042) in favour of the intervention. Another study (n = 8) reported a significant increase in social participation in favour of the intervention (p = 0.01). However, our meta-analyses found no significant effect of personal smart technology on goal attainment, cognitive or psychological function.

At present, there is insufficient evidence to support the clinical benefit of personal smart technologies to improve outcomes in acquired brain injury. Researchers need to conduct more randomised studies to evaluate these interventions and measure their potential effects/harms.

 

via A systematic review of personal smart technologies used to improve outcomes in adults with acquired brain injuries – Jade Kettlewell, Roshan das Nair, Kate Radford,

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[BOOK] Introduction to Smart eHealth and eCare Technologies.

Front CoverBoth the demographics and lack of resources in the health and well-being industry are increasingly forcing us to find alternative solutions for individualized health and social care. In an effort to address this issue, smart technologies present enormous potential in solving this challenge. This book strives to enhance communication and collaboration between technology and health and social care sectors. The reader will receive an extensive overview of the possibilities of various technologies in care sectors (including ICT, electronics, automation, and sensor technology) written by experts from various countries. It will prove extremely useful for engineers developing well-being related systems, software, or other devices that can be used by professionals working with people with specialist needs, well-being and health service providers, educators teaching related courses, and upper level undergraduate students and graduate student studying related topics. The technology focus of the book is widespread and addresses elderly care and hospitals, in addition to solutions for various user groups, devices, and technologies. Beyond serving as a resource for nurses and people working in care sector, the book is also meant to give guidelines for engineers developing person-centered systems by exploring the integration of these technologies into service systems.

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Source: Merilampi: Introduction to Smart eHealth and eCare… – Google Scholar

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