Posts Tagged smartphone

[Project Report] “Active on Wheels” INF2260/4060 H2016 – Full Text PDF

1. Introduction

The “Active on Wheels” project is done in collaboration with Matthijs Wouda at Sunnaas Sykehus HF, and our project statement is simply put to design a useful, inspiring, and motivating interface for the “Active on Wheels” app. The app combines a smartphone, fitness-armband, and a heart rate monitor belt to provide accurate energy expenditure (how many calories you use) for wheelchair users. The app exists today with a functional, but bare bones design (See Fig 1), which our task is to change. The goal of the app is to enable exercise measuring and tracking for disabled people outside of hospital settings, in order to motivate and support them to exercise and work out.

Full Text PDF

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[Abstract] A Rehabilitation-Internet-of-Things in the Home to Augment Motor Skills and Exercise Training

Abstract

Although motor learning theory has led to evidence-based practices, few trials have revealed the superiority of one theory-based therapy over another after stroke. Nor have improvements in skills been as clinically robust as one might hope.

We review some possible explanations, then potential technology-enabled solutions. Over the Internet, the type, quantity, and quality of practice and exercise in the home and community can be monitored remotely and feedback provided to optimize training frequency, intensity, and progression at home. A theory-driven foundation of synergistic interventions for walking, reaching and grasping, strengthening, and fitness could be provided by a bundle of home-based Rehabilitation Internet-of-Things (RIoT) devices. A RIoT might include wearable, activity-recognition sensors and instrumented rehabilitation devices with radio transmission to a smartphone or tablet to continuously measure repetitions, speed, accuracy, forces, and temporal spatial features of movement.

Using telerehabilitation resources, a therapist would interpret the data and provide behavioral training for self-management via goal setting and instruction to increase compliance and long-term carryover. On top of this user-friendly, safe, and conceptually sound foundation to support more opportunity for practice, experimental interventions could be tested or additions and replacements made, perhaps drawing from virtual reality and gaming programs or robots. RIoT devices continuously measure the actual amount of quality practice; improvements and plateaus over time in strength, fitness, and skills; and activity and participation in home and community settings. Investigators may gain more control over some of the confounders of their trials and patients will have access to inexpensive therapies.

Source: A Rehabilitation-Internet-of-Things in the Home to Augment Motor Skills and Exercise Training

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[Abstract] A Rehabilitation-Internet-of-Things in the Home to Augment Motor Skills and Exercise Training

Abstract

Although motor learning theory has led to evidence-based practices, few trials have revealed the superiority of one theory-based therapy over another after stroke. Nor have improvements in skills been as clinically robust as one might hope. We review some possible explanations, then potential technology-enabled solutions. Over the Internet, the type, quantity, and quality of practice and exercise in the home and community can be monitored remotely and feedback provided to optimize training frequency, intensity, and progression at home. A theory-driven foundation of synergistic interventions for walking, reaching and grasping, strengthening, and fitness could be provided by a bundle of home-based Rehabilitation Internet-of-Things (RIoT) devices. A RIoT might include wearable, activity-recognition sensors and instrumented rehabilitation devices with radio transmission to a smartphone or tablet to continuously measure repetitions, speed, accuracy, forces, and temporal spatial features of movement. Using telerehabilitation resources, a therapist would interpret the data and provide behavioral training for self-management via goal setting and instruction to increase compliance and long-term carryover. On top of this user-friendly, safe, and conceptually sound foundation to support more opportunity for practice, experimental interventions could be tested or additions and replacements made, perhaps drawing from virtual reality and gaming programs or robots. RIoT devices continuously measure the actual amount of quality practice; improvements and plateaus over time in strength, fitness, and skills; and activity and participation in home and community settings. Investigators may gain more control over some of the confounders of their trials and patients will have access to inexpensive therapies.

Source: A Rehabilitation-Internet-of-Things in the Home to Augment Motor Skills and Exercise Training

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[Blog post] 10 DISASTER APPS THAT COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE

SEPTEMBER 5, 2016
In 2016, there is a great need to explore faster and more effective methods of activating relief efforts. These apps can help keep you and your family safe in the event of an emergency. If you, or someone you know, has a disability which will make escaping a disaster situation not easy, it is imperative to plan ahead and give yourself enough time.

text description of infographic is below

 

Text description:

  1. Disaster Alert
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Disaster Alert by the Pacific Disaster Centre provides mobile access to multi-hazard monitoring of and early warning for “active hazards” aroudn the globe.

  1. First Aid by American Red Cross
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Features simple step-by-step instructions that guide you through everyday first aid scenarios.

  1. Global Emergency Overview
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

The app allows you to quickly browse through the different countries included in the overview while providing easy access to more in-depth sectoral analysis and baseline information.

  1. Humanitarian Kiosk
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

The Humanitarian Kiosk created by the United Nations provides a range of up-to-the-minute humanitarian related information from emergencies around the world.

  1. Real Time Warning
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Real Time Warning offers alerts about disasters around the world. Users select an event to see its location, damage, severity, and rumble radius on a world map.

  1. Earthquake Alert!
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Earthquake Alert offers information about earthquakes with a magnitude of 1.0 and up in the US and magnitude of 4.0 and up from anywhere else in the world.

  1. SirenGPS
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

With SIrenGPS you can contact the emergency services with the tap of the button and it instantly gives them your exact location and personal details.

  1. Red Panic Button
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

By simply pushing the red panic buton, this app will send your GPS coordinates and a link to Google Maps by SMS or email to previously specified contact list.

  1. Life360
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Life 360 allows you and your family to set up a private network, then with a click of a button, you can let yourr family where you are and if you’re safe.

  1. Guardly
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Guardly enables you to receive emergency and operational alerts from your company or company’s security team in the event of an emergency at work.

Emergency Checklist

In the event of an emergency:

  1. Assess your personal safety before taking action.
  2. Call emergency services and tell them:
    a. The location of the emergency including nearby landmarks.
    b. The telephone number from where the call is being made.
    c. What happened.
    d. How many people require assistance.
    e. Condition of the people.
    f. What assistance is being given.
    g. Stay on the line until the operator says it’s okay to hang up.
  3. Try to stay calm until the emergency services arrive.

References:

News.abs-cbn.com/ Lifestyle/ 07/ 17/ 15/ 7-mobile-apps-can-help-during-natural-disasters
Heavy.com/tech/2015/09/top-5-best-free-disaster-emergency-red-cross-apps-for-iphone-android thenextweb.com/Insider/2015/11/17/7—essential-personal-safety-apps-for-emergency-situations/#gref
iphonelife.com/content/top-iphone-features-and-apps-can-save-your-life
Au.reachout.com/what-to-do-in-an-emergency

Source: Nature’s Water Ltd.

Source: 10-disaster-apps-that-could-save-your-life-infographic – Assistive Technology Blog

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[WEB SITE] Samsung Unveils Prototype Stroke Detecting Headset

samsung-stroke

While brain monitoring using EEG is not a new technique, advancements in technology may allow it to be used for detecting a variety of conditions that are currently hard to diagnose. Samsung is continuing to show evidence that it’s serious about getting a major foothold in the medical field with the announcement that it’s been working on a wearable EEG headset that can be used by patients themselves to detect signs of stroke as well as for regular monitoring to gauge stress levels, analyze sleep, and other brain health parameters that are often not measured quantitatively.

The Early Detection Sensor & Algorithm Package (EDSAP) will pair up with a user’s smartphone or tablet to display the results of the ECG tests, which can be done within about a minute. The company says that its sensors are able to pickup a much higher quality signal than current EEG headsets thanks to newly developed dry electrodes made of a novel material discovered by the group. The material is rubbery in feel, is highly conductive, and doesn’t require a gel or saline solution to be applied to make a good electrical connection with the scalp.

On the software side, Samsung’s team developed an algorithm that compares a particular EEG scan against a previous analysis of a bunch of stroke patient EEG scans. Using signal processing and artificial intelligence methods, the algorithm aims to spot telltale signs of stroke. In addition to this technology finding its way into ambulances and emergency rooms, the company believes that it can be used by patients themselves that suspect having had a minor stroke. Moreover, the dry electrodes may allow other form factors to help monitor EEG over longer periods by embedding the electrodes into the tips of glasses or into headphones to grab brainwaves through the temples.

While the technology is currently being explored for EEG, the researchers believe that it can be translated to monitor the heart via ECG.

Source: Samsung Unveils Prototype Stroke Detecting Headset | Medgadget

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[ARTICLE] Design of a Smartphone Application with Integrated Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) Treatment Randomization and On-The-Fly Stimulus Parameter Adjustment for Streamlining the Clinical Evaluation of FES Protocols – Full Text PDF

Abstract

The clinical application of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) has evolved over the last five decades.

However, the use of the Randomized Control Trial (RCT) methodology in evaluating the clinical effectiveness of new and existing applications of FES is a demanding process adding time and cost to these trials.

Consequently, there has been a low level of RCTs applied to FES studies. Poor quality trials result in poor evidence of FES effectiveness with a consequence that the technique may not be adopted into clinical practice.

In this paper some of the key challenges encountered in FES randomised control clinical trials are identified and a solution to address these challenges is presented in the form of a smartphone App and a Bluetooth controlled FES architecture.

The design and evaluation of a smartphone application using a User Centred Design approach to provide automatic blind randomization control and facilitating the wireless temporal control of a portable Bluetooth enabled FES device is described.

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[WEB SITE] Handable Aims to Help Those with Hand and Wrist Mobility Issues Hold Phones and Tablets with Ease

Published on October 16, 2015

Mobile Innovations Inc Hand-Held Phone Holder

The HandAble Company, a division of Mobile Innovations, introduces the Handable handheld phone holder, an accessory built to enable those who experience short- or long-term hand and wrist issues hold their cell phones and tablets more easily.

According to a media release from the company, the accessory features a peel-and-stick design that attaches to any smartphone or tablet. Once attached, the top of Handable extends away from the back of the device. The user then slides their fingers underneath.

The Handable then enables the user to provide a strong grip on the cell phone or tablet without needing to use grasping muscles.

With the Handable in place, the cell phone or tablet device remains free for the user to rotate, without having to worry about worsening their injury when using devices for an extended period, the release continues.

For more information, visit the HandAble Company.

Source: Handable Aims to Help Those with Hand and Wrist Mobility Issues Hold Phones and Tablets with Ease – Rehab Managment

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[WEB SITE] Smartphones, Apps Prove Liberating For Those With Special Needs.

Ruben Morales, a 59-year-old retired engineer who is blind and lives in Silicon Valley, has used a specialized screen-reading program for years to write and run spreadsheets on his desktop computer.

But recently, he figuratively cut the cord to his desktop and joined the mobile revolution. Morales was visiting an area Veterans Affairs blind rehabilitation center, learning how to use an iPhone’s features for people with vision impairment.

“It’s pretty amazing,” Morales said, demonstrating how he can call up a song and play it with a few taps. “Whatever I can do on the computer I can basically do it on the iPhone. It has the same capability.”

The smartphone, a gadget designed for the sighted, has turned out to be a godsend for those who are blind and visually impaired, making them more independent than ever before.

With VoiceOver, the iPhone’s built-in gesture-based app that reads text on a touch-screen aloud, or Google Android’s TalkBack, users who are blind can access anything on their phones. The user activates apps with a few gestures — single finger to explore and find buttons, one-finger touch to identify things on the screen and double-tap to push the button after it’s located.

“It’s a learning curve, but you can learn to do every single thing on an iPhone that anyone else can do,” said Lee Huffman, editor of AccessWorld, published by the American Foundation for the Blind. “These devices are opening up a whole new world.”

It didn’t look like it would turn out that way at first.

“The blind community started getting really panicky” when smartphones and later, tablets, took off following the iPhone’s debut in 2007, researcher Joshua Miele, associate director of Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute in San Francisco, recalled. “Touch-screens were a real concern.

”But in 2009, Apple included VoiceOver in its mobile operating system, and followed up with the personal assistant Siri in 2011, launching a new world of mobility for the visually impaired. Google added TalkBack, a screen reader, to its Android operating system in 2009 and Google Now, a personal assistant, in 2012. Microsoft mobile has similar features.

“It’s made a huge difference, productivity-wise,” said Jennison Asuncion, accessibility leader at LinkedIn, who is blind. “I use my mobile phone probably even more than lot of people.”

Erin Lauridsen, 32, a trainer at the Independent Living Resource Center in San Francisco, has been blind since birth and grew up using expensive, clunky, single-purpose devices for doing coursework in school. “When the iPhone 3GS came out with VoiceOver built in it was a huge game-changer for me and a lot of other people,” she said.

She uses an app called BlindSquare for navigation; Money Reader to identify currency denominations; and Voice Dream Reader to assemble audio play lists of documents from many sources. She also uses Uber and a lot of other popular apps.

“I’m on an equal footing with what everyone else does — the Yelping, Facebooking and Twittering,” she said.

People who are visually impaired want to use their mobile phones like anyone else, said Astrid Weber, who researches user experience at Google, visiting people who are visually impaired in their homes to see what they need and how they use technology.

“Mobility is really important for them,” she said.

Google Now — the Android personal assistant — is popular with users with vision impairment, said Eve Andersson, manager of Google’s accessibility engineering. Her parents who are vision impaired use it all the time, she said. “They ask their phones questions, ask it to call me, ask it for directions and create reminders. They love being able to do that with their voice.

”For years there have been screen readers for desktop computers. OutSpoken, developed by Berkeley Systems in the late 1980s, was the first for the Mac, according to Smith-Kettlewell’s Miele, who worked for the company.

But while VoiceOver and TalkBack broke the tether to the desktop, third-party apps still have to be made accessible to people with disabilities.

There’s a legal issue too. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires websites and mobile applications to be accessible, said disability rights lawyer Lainey Feingold, although regulations are still being worked on by the U.S. Department of Justice.

Google announced Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities last year with a $20 million grant for technology innovators in the nonprofit community who work on technology to make people with disabilities more independent. “We’re actively looking for proposals,” said Brigitte Hoyer Gosselink of Google.org….

Continue —> Smartphones, Apps Prove Liberating For Those With Special Needs – Disability Scoop

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[ARTICLE] Smartphone apps to improve fitness and increase physical activity among young people: protocol of the Apps for IMproving FITness (AIMFIT) randomized controlled trial – Full Text HTML

Abstract

Background

Physical activity is a modifiable behavior related to many preventable non-communicable diseases. There is an age-related decline in physical activity levels in young people, which tracks into adulthood. Common interactive technologies such as smartphones, particularly employing immersive features, may enhance the appeal and delivery of interventions to increase levels of physical activity in young people. The primary aim of the Apps for IMproving FITness (AIMFIT) trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of two popular “off-the-shelf” smartphone apps for improving cardiorespiratory fitness in young people.

Methods/Design

A three-arm, parallel, randomized controlled trial will be conducted in Auckland, New Zealand. Fifty-one eligible young people aged 14–17 years will be randomized to one of three conditions: 1) use of an immersive smartphone app, 2) use of a non-immersive app, or 3) usual behavior (control). Both smartphone apps consist of an eight-week training program designed to improve fitness and ability to run 5 km, however, the immersive app features a game-themed design and adds a narrative. Data are collected at baseline and 8 weeks. The primary outcome is cardiorespiratory fitness, assessed as time to complete the one mile run/walk test at 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes are physical activity levels, self-efficacy, enjoyment, psychological need satisfaction, and acceptability and usability of the apps. Analysis using intention to treat principles will be performed using regression models.

Discussion

Despite the proliferation of commercially available smartphone applications, there is a dearth of empirical evidence to support their effectiveness on the targeted health behavior. This pragmatic study will determine the effectiveness of two popular “off-the-shelf” apps as a stand-alone instrument for improving fitness and physical activity among young people. Adherence to app use will not be closely controlled; however, random allocation of participants, a heterogeneous group, and data analysis using intention to treat principles provide internal and external validity to the study. The primary outcome will be objectively assessed with a valid and reliable field-based test, as well as the secondary outcome of physical activity, via accelerometry. If effective, such applications could be used alongside existing interventions to promote fitness and physical activity in this population.

Continue —> BMC Public Health | Full text | Smartphone apps to improve fitness and increase physical activity among young people: protocol of the Apps for IMproving FITness (AIMFIT) randomized controlled trial.

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[WEB SITE] 3 Ways a Smartphone Can Detect If You’re Depressed

Post image for 3 Ways a Smartphone Can Detect If You’re DepressedDepression can be predicted just from smartphone data, a small new study finds.

Just by tracking where people go and how much they use their smartphone, researchers were able to predict depression with 87% accuracy.

Dr David Mohr, one of the study’s authors, said:

“The significance of this is we can detect if a person has depressive symptoms and the severity of those symptoms without asking them any questions.”

For the study, researchers tracked 40 people through their smartphones over a period of two weeks.

The first key factor which predicted depression was time spent using the phone.

Non-depressed people spent, on average, 17 minutes using their phone each day.

Depressed people spent, on average, 68 minutes using their smartphone each day.

Dr Mohr explained:

“People are likely, when on their phones, to avoid thinking about things that are troubling, painful feelings or difficult relationships.

It’s an avoidance behavior we see in depression.”

The second factor linked to depression was changes to normal schedules.

People’s regular routines are disrupted by depression.

For example, by leaving for work at different times each day.

Thirdly, depressed people tend to go to fewer different places.

Dr Mohr explained:

“The data showing depressed people tended not to go many places reflects the loss of motivation seen in depression.

When people are depressed, they tend to withdraw and don’t have the motivation or energy to go out and do things.”

Incredibly, the smartphone data was more accurate in predicting depression than simply asking people how happy or sad they were each day.

The researchers think the technology could be used to monitor people who are at risk of depression.

It may also be of benefit in encouraging helpful behaviour changes.

Dr Sohrob Saeb, the study’s first author, said:

“We will see if we can reduce symptoms of depression by encouraging people to visit more locations throughout the day, have a more regular routine, spend more time in a variety of places or reduce mobile phone use.”

The study was published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (Saeb et al., 2015).

via 3 Ways a Smartphone Can Detect If You’re Depressed – PsyBlog.

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