Posts Tagged Stepping Training

[Abstract] Stepping training with external feedback relating to lower limb support ability effectively improved complex motor activity in ambulatory patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial

 

BACKGROUND: Lower limb support ability is important for steady and efficient mobility, but previous data commonly involved training during double stance positions, with or without external feedback, using a complex and costly machine.
AIM: To compare the effects of stepping training with or without external feedback in relation to the lower limb support ability of the affected limb on the functional ability necessary for independence in individuals with stroke.
DESIGN: A single-blinded, randomised controlled trial.
SETTING: Tertiary rehabilitation centres.
POPULATION: Ambulatory participants with stroke who walked independently over at least 10 meters with or without walking devices.
METHODS: Thirty-six participants were randomly arranged to be involved in a program of stepping training with or without external feedback related to the lower limb support ability of the affected limb (18 participants/group) for 30 minutes, followed by overground walking training for 10 minutes, 5 days/week over 4 weeks. The outcomes, including the lower limb support ability of the affected legs during stepping, functional ability and spatial walking data, were assessed prior to training, immediately after the first training session, and after 2- and 4- week training.
RESULTS: Participants demonstrated significant improvement in the amount of lower limb support ability, immediately after the first training with external feedback. Then, these participants showed further improvement in both the amount and duration of lower limb support ability, as well as the timed up and go data after 2 and 4 weeks of training (p < 0.05). This improvement was not found following control training.
CONCLUSIONS: The external feedback relating to lower limb support ability during stepping training effectively improved the movement stability and complex motor activity of ambulatory individuals with stroke who had long post-stroke time (approximately 3 years).
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Stepping training protocols and feedback can be easily applied in various settings using the amount of body-weight from an upright digital bathroom scale. Thus, the findings offer an alternative rehabilitation strategy for clinical, community and home-based settings for stroke individuals.

Full Text PDF

via Stepping training with external feedback relating to lower limb support ability effectively improved complex motor activity in ambulatory patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial – European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2019 Oct 15 – Minerva Medica – Journals

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Compensation or Recovery? Altered Kinetics and Neuromuscular Synergies Following High-Intensity Stepping Training Poststroke

Background. High-intensity, variable stepping training can improve walking speed in individuals poststroke, although neuromuscular strategies used to achieve faster speeds are unclear. We evaluated changes in joint kinetics and neuromuscular coordination following such training; movement strategies consistent with intact individuals were considered evidence of recovery and abnormal strategies indicative of compensation.

Methods. A total of 15 individuals with stroke (duration: 23 ± 30 months) received ≤40 sessions of high-intensity stepping in variable contexts (tasks and environments). Lower-extremity kinetics and electromyographic (EMG) activity were collected prior to (BSL) and following (POST) training at peak treadmill speeds and speeds matched to peak BSL (MATCH). Primary measures included positive (concentric) joint and total limb powers, measures of interlimb (paretic/nonparetic powers) and intralimb compensation (hip/ankle or knee/ankle powers), and muscle synergies calculated using nonnegative matrix factorization.

Results. Gains in most positive paretic and nonparetic joint powers were observed at higher speeds at POST, with decreased interlimb compensation and limited changes in intralimb compensation. There were very few differences in kinetic measures between BSL to MATCH conditions. However, the number of neuromuscular synergies increased significantly following training at both POST and MATCH conditions, indicating gains from training rather than altered speeds. Despite these results, speed improvements were associated primarily with changes in nonparetic versus paretic powers.

Conclusion. Gains in locomotor function were accomplished by movement strategies consistent with both recovery and compensation. These and other data indicate that both strategies may be necessary to maximize walking function in patients poststroke.

via Compensation or Recovery? Altered Kinetics and Neuromuscular Synergies Following High-Intensity Stepping Training Poststroke – Marzieh M. Ardestani, Catherine R. Kinnaird, Christopher E. Henderson, T. George Hornby, 2019

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: