Posts Tagged Supra malleolar orthosis

[ARTICLE] Feasibility study into self-administered training at home using an arm and hand device with motivational gaming environment in chronic stroke – Full Text HTML/PDF

Abstract

Background: Assistive and robotic training devices are increasingly used for rehabilitation of the hemiparetic arm after stroke, although applications for the wrist and hand are trailing behind. Furthermore, applying a training device in domestic settings may enable an increased training dose of functional arm and hand training. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and potential clinical changes associated with a technology-supported arm and hand training system at home for patients with chronic stroke.

Methods: A dynamic wrist and hand orthosis was combined with a remotely monitored user interface with motivational gaming environment for self-administered training at home. Twenty-four chronic stroke patients with impaired arm/hand function were recruited to use the training system at home for six weeks. Evaluation of feasibility involved training duration, usability and motivation. Clinical outcomes on arm/hand function, activity and participation were assessed before and after six weeks of training and at two-month follow-up.

Results: Mean System Usability Scale score was 69 % (SD 17 %), mean Intrinsic Motivation Inventory score was 5.2 (SD 0.9) points, and mean training duration per week was 105 (SD 66) minutes. Median Fugl-Meyer score improved from 37 (IQR 30) pre-training to 41 (IQR 32) post-training and was sustained at two-month follow-up (40 (IQR 32)). The Stroke Impact Scale improved from 56.3 (SD 13.2) pre-training to 60.0 (SD 13.9) post-training, with a trend at follow-up (59.8 (SD 15.2)). No significant improvements were found on the Action Research Arm Test and Motor Activity Log.

Conclusions: Remotely monitored post-stroke training at home applying gaming exercises while physically supporting the wrist and hand showed to be feasible: participants were able and motivated to use the training system independently at home. Usability shows potential, although several usability issues need further attention. Upper extremity function and quality of life improved after training, although dexterity did not. These findings indicate that home-based arm and hand training with physical support from a dynamic orthosis is a feasible tool to enable self-administered practice at home. Such an approach enables practice without dependence on therapist availability, allowing an increase in training dose with respect to treatment in supervised settings.

Continue —> JNER | Full text | Feasibility study into self-administered training at home using an arm and hand device with motivational gaming environment in chronic stroke

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[WEB SITE] SureStep: A Revolutionary Bracing Concept

AFO Mechanics

surestep-2SureStep manufactures a variety of products but is primarily known for the SMO (Supra malleolar orthosis) and pediatric AFOs (ankle foot orthosis). The SureStep SMO is meant for patients up to 80 pounds with hypotonic presentations. The purpose is to control the side to side movements of the ankle. The trim lines can be extended longer laterally or medially depending on whether the patient is pronating or supinating. As patients grow older there is a device called the Big Shot that accommodate children and adults weighing over 80 pounds. What makes the SureStep SMO so unique is the dynamic function that the brace allows. It uses compression to create alignment, unique trim-lines to allow freedom of motion where needed, and made from a material that travels together along with the foot.

Controling the Tri-Planar Deformities

This works under compression to maintain stability through midline. In young patients with CMT they can possibly present with a more over pronated foot position because of the low muscle tone (hypotonia) prior to developing a high arch foot presentation. This can been seen in CMT patients who have some symptoms of the disease but have not developed a high arch otherwise known as pes cavus foot. The SMO holds the heel in vertical alignment, giving stability in a coronal plane (side to side) position. An SMO is not necessarily for a patient who has weaknesses pushing up or down the ankle, just poor side-to-side movement.

Improving Stability During Gait

The device is designed to allow for motion to still occur from in and out of the midline position but limits the extremes that the foot would go to, in other words the extreme rolling inward our outward of the ankle. The goal is to improve balance and stability, or limit orthopedic injury. This helps limit out toeing or in toeing as well by improving the position to foot is landing on the ground. Having improved alignment may also utilize remaining strength for dorsiflexion or plantarflexion because the line of pull that these muscles are in has improved line of progression.

Fitting the Device

The trim-lines of the SureStep SMO are designed to be either longer on the lateral border for pronation or medial border for patient who supinate excessively and the orthotist should make the appropriate selection based on the patient’s mechanics. These trim-lines are critical to the successful outcome of this device. Although the SureStep SMO is primarily designed for a younger population as children get older or adults who still have need for such a device the same mechanism of function can be accomplished using the BigShot SMO manufactured by SureStep.

Continue —>  SureStep: A Revolutionary Bracing Concept | Lower Extremity Review Magazine.

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