Posts Tagged surgery

[WEB PAGE] Study offers possibility of squelching a focal epilepsy seizure before symptoms appear

Patients with focal epilepsy that does not respond to medications badly need alternative treatments.

In a first-in-humans pilot study, researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have identified a sentinel area of the brain that may give an early warning before clinical seizure manifestations appear. They have also validated an algorithm that can automatically detect that early warning.

These two findings offer the possibility of squelching a focal epilepsy seizure — before the patient feels any symptoms — through neurostimulation of the sentinel area of the brain. This is somewhat akin to the way an implantable defibrillator in the heart can staunch heart arrhythmias before they injure the heart.

In the pilot study, three epilepsy patients undergoing brain surgery to map the source of their focal epilepsy seizures also gave consent to add an investigational aspect to their planned surgeries.

As neurosurgeons inserted long, thin, needle-like electrodes into the brain to map the location of the electrical storm that initiates an epileptic seizure, they also carefully positioned the electrodes to add one more task — simultaneously record the electrical activity at the anterior nucleus of the thalamus.

The thalamus is a structure sitting deep in the brain that is well connected with other parts of the brain. The thalamus controls sleep and wakefulness, so it often is called the “pacemaker” of the brain. Importantly, preclinical studies have shown that focal sources of seizures in the cortex can recruit other parts of the brain to help generate a seizure. One of these recruited areas is the anterior thalamic nucleus.

The UAB team led by Sandipan Pati, M.D., assistant professor of neurology, found that nearly all of the epileptic seizures detected in the three patients — which began in focal areas of the cortex outside of the thalamus — also recruited seizure-like electrical activity in the anterior thalamic nucleus after a very short time lag. Importantly, both of these initial electrical activities appeared before any clinical manifestations of the seizures.

The UAB researchers also used electroencelphalography, or EEG, brain recordings from the patients to develop and validate an algorithm that was able to automatically detect initiation of that seizure-like electrical activity in the anterior thalamic nucleus.

“This exciting finding opens up an avenue to develop brain stimulation therapy that can alter activities in the cortex by stimulating the thalamus in response to a seizure,” Pati said. “Neurostimulation of the thalamus, instead of the cortex, would avoid interference with cognition, in particular, memory.”

“In epilepsy, different aspects of memory go down,” Pati explained. “Particularly long-term memory, like remembering names, or remembering events. The common cause is that epilepsy affects the hippocampus, the structure that is the brain’s memory box.”

Pati said these first three patients were a feasibility study, and none of the patients had complications from their surgeries. The UAB team is now extending the study to another dozen patients to confirm the findings.

“Hopefully, after the bigger group is done, we can consider stimulating the thalamus,” Pati said. That next step would have the goals of improved control of seizures and improved cognition, vigilance and memory for patients.

For epilepsy patients where medications have failed, the surgery to map the source of focal seizures is a prelude to two current treatment options — epilepsy surgery to remove part of the brain or continuous, deep-brain stimulation. If the UAB research is successful, deep brain stimulation would be given automatically, only as the seizure initiates, and it would be targeted at the thalamus, where the stimulation might interfere less with memory.

 

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[WEB SITE] Surgery for Epilepsy – What Do You Need to Know?

Surgery for Epilepsy – What Do You Need to Know?

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders that can affect anyone irrespective of their age and gender. Marked by recurrent seizures causing a disturbance in the normal functioning of the body, epilepsy takes a toll on the patient’s overall normal life. Therefore, it is crucial that the patient must seek medical consultation from the best neurologist in India for accurate and timely treatment.

Thanks to the advancements in the medical field, epilepsy can be controlled by using various treatment options. Approximately 70% of people who suffer from epilepsy can control this condition through medications prescribed by a neurologist. In case medications are not enough to manage the condition, the patients can opt for surgery or other alternatives.

Now, deciding to undergo neurosurgery is a big step. Hence, it is very important to gather all the information about the surgery and find the best neurosurgeon in India for a successful result. For anyoneplanning to undergo a surgery for epilepsy, here is what they need to know.

Types of Epilepsy Surgery

Usually, the main aim of an epilepsy surgery is either to remove the part of the brain which causes seizures orcontrol the nerves to stop the seizures. Depending on the patient’s condition, the neurosurgeon can opt for different types of epilepsy surgery, including:

  • Resective Surgery

It is the most common type of surgery that is performed to treat epilepsy. In resective surgery, the neurosurgeons remove the part of the brain that causes seizures. It is helpful in reducing the number of seizures and limiting the risk of permanent brain damage.

  • Multiple Subpial Transection

It is a rare procedure that is performedonly when the patient suffers from severe and frequent seizures. During this surgery, the neurosurgeoncreates small incisions in the brain to stop the seizures.

  • Hemispherectomy

In this type of surgery, the neurosurgeon removes, disconnects or disables half of the brain (cerebral hemisphere). It is usually performed in cases where children suffer from a damaged hemisphere and have intractable seizures.

  • Corpus Callosotomy

Unlike other epilepsy surgeries, it focuses on decreasing the severity of the seizures rather than stopping them. Neurosurgeon cuts the nerve fiberswhich helps in preventing the seizures from spreading from one side of the hemisphere to the other.

The Surgery

Before making the surgical decision, the neurosurgeon ensures that the patient is eligible for the surgery by performing various tests and evaluating the results. It is only after a thorough examination that the neurosurgeon begins with the procedure.

The surgery is performed by neurosurgeons trained in this field. Hospitals like Max Healthcare have teams consisting of thebest neurosurgeon in India. Before the surgery, the neurosurgeon informs the patient about all the procedures, risks and benefits.

In an anterior temporal lobectomy, that is the most common type of Resective Surgery.The neurosurgeons make an opening in the skin of the head andmake a circular opening in the skull, known as a craniotomy. Using special equipment, they perform brain mapping to locate the areas of the brain that cause seizures. Once the area is identified, neurosurgeons remove that area while carefully looking through an operative microscope. After the surgery, the bone flap is replaced and secured with titanium plates and screws. The skin of the head is also sutured back together.

Usually, the surgery takes three to four hours,and the patient is shifted to the neuroscience intensive care unit (NSICU) for observation and monitoring. The hospital stay can vary from three to four days.

The Road to Recovery

After the surgery, the patient needs to take at least three to four weeks of rest before resuming to normal activities. If the patient keeps following the advice of doctors and adopts a healthy lifestyle, the recovery process can accelerate significantly. Moreover, there are various precautions that are needed to be takenin order to avoid any complications. Doctors also recommend speech or physical therapy if there are any issues after the surgery.

 

via Surgery for Epilepsy – What Do You Need to Know? » Northeast Today

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[NEWS] Surgery, precision medicine: the big hopes for epilepsy

19 March 2018

Αποτέλεσμα εικόνας για Surgery, precision medicine: the big hopes for epilepsy

PRECISION therapies targeting the molecular mechanisms of the disease are the shining hope for patients with uncontrolled, drug-resistant epilepsy, according to the authors of a narrative review published by the MJA.

The review was written in the wake of a new classification of epileptic seizures released by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILEA) in March 2017, which emphasises the importance of aetiology in allowing “optimisation of management”, as well as the importance of identifying comorbidities, such as learning, psychiatric and behavioural problems.

“The treatment of epilepsy relies primarily on antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy, which fully controls seizures in about two-thirds of patients,” wrote the authors – Dr Piero Perucca, consultant neurologist at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and Monash University, Professor Ingrid Scheffer, paediatric neurologist at Austin Health and the Florey Institute, and Dr Michelle Kiley, the director of Epilepsy Services at the Royal Adelaide Hospital.

“Second generation AEDs have expanded opportunities for tailoring treatment, but the burden of drug-resistant epilepsy, with its associated risks of disability, morbidity and mortality, has remained substantially unchanged for several decades.”

Over 15 second-generation AEDs have been developed since the 1990s and although they offer greater choice, and therefore more targeted options for patients, they have not significantly altered seizure-free outcomes.

Patients with drug-resistant epilepsy – defined by ILEA as “failure of adequate trials of two tolerated, appropriately chosen and used AED schedules (whether as monotherapies or in combination) to achieve sustained seizure-freedom” – should be considered for surgery at the earliest opportunity, the review authors wrote.

“Epilepsy surgery involves resection or, less commonly, disconnection or destruction of epileptic tissue, and it is the most effective therapy for selected patients with drug-resistant epilepsy,” they wrote.

Despite that, and official recommendations from the American Academy of Neurology, the American Epilepsy Society and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, delayed uptake of the surgical option remains “of concern”.

“These recommendations have not translated to increased use of epilepsy surgery,” Perucca and colleagues wrote.

“Consideration of epilepsy surgery still occurs typically 20 years after epilepsy onset, despite evidence of its effectiveness after failure of two adequate AED trials, and despite data suggesting that longer epilepsy duration adversely affects surgical outcome.”

Other non-pharmacological therapies – including vagus nerve stimulation, transcutaneous stimulation of the vagus or trigeminal nerve, deep brain stimulation of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus and responsive cortical stimulation, ketogenic diet and a modified Atkins diet – are also evaluated by the review authors as hopeful paths for research.

Perucca and colleagues were cautious in their hopes for medicinal cannabis.

“Scientifically sound evidence on the effectiveness of cannabinoids in epilepsy was provided only recently [in cases of Dravet and Lennox–Gastaut syndromes] … Overall, more evidence is required before cannabidiol can be considered further for the treatment of most individuals with epilepsy,” they wrote.

Precision medicine provides perhaps the brightest hope for patients battling resistant epilepsy, the review authors wrote.

“The advent of next-generation sequencing has fuelled renewed hope, especially following successful models developed in oncology.

“Epilepsy offers a promising opportunity for precision medicine, due to the myriad of gene discoveries, availability of experimental in vitro and in vivo models for drug screening, and the feasibility of conducting small, cost-effective trials of novel agents.

“For some genetic epilepsies, precision medicine is already a reality,” they said.

“A prime example is glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome, in which dominant mutations in SLC2A1 result in impaired brain uptake of glucose. These patients respond to the ketogenic diet, which provides the brain with an alternative energy substrate.

“Identifying the molecular cause of epilepsy also allows the prevention or minimisation of AED adverse effects. In SCN1A-related epilepsies, sodium channel-blocking AEDs, such as carbamazepine, may aggravate seizures. In epilepsies due to POLG mutations, avoidance of valproate is recommended due to increased risk of hepatic failure.”

The review authors concluded by emphasising surgery and precision medicine as the areas of greatest potential for patients with epilepsy seeking to lead a seizure-free life.

“A subset of drug-resistant individuals can be rendered seizure-free by epilepsy surgery, which should be considered as soon as two AEDs have failed.

“In other individuals, seizure control can be improved by using alternative AEDs or non-pharmacological therapies, but they rarely result in seizure freedom.

“Hope to reduce the proportion of patients with uncontrolled seizures rests on future therapeutic advances, including precision therapies targeting underlying molecular mechanisms.”

via Surgery, precision medicine: the big hopes for epilepsy – MJA InSight 10, 19 March 2018 | doctorportal

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[WEB SITE] New method uses advanced noninvasive neuroimaging to localize and identify epileptic lesions

Epilepsy affects more than 65 million people worldwide. One-third of these patients have seizures that are not controlled by medications. In addition, one-third have brain lesions, the hallmark of the disease, which cannot be located by conventional imaging methods. Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have piloted a new method using advanced noninvasive neuroimaging to recognize the neurotransmitter glutamate, thought to be the culprit in the most common form of medication-resistant epilepsy. Their work is published today in Science Translational Medicine.

Glutamate is an amino acid which transmits signals from neuron to neuron, telling them when to fire. Glutamate normally docks with the neuron, gives it the signal to fire and is swiftly cleared. In patients with epilepsy, stroke and possibly ALS, the glutamate is not cleared, leaving the neuron overwhelmed with messages and in a toxic state of prolonged excitation.

In localization-related epilepsy, the most common form of medication-resistant epilepsy, seizures are generated in a focused section of the brain; in 65 percent of patients, this occurs in the temporal lobe. Removal of the seizure-generating region of the temporal lobe, guided by preoperative MRI, can offer a cure. However, a third of these patients have no identified abnormality on conventional imaging studies and, therefore, more limited surgical options.

“Identification of the brain region generating seizures in location-related epilepsy is associated with significantly increased chance of seizure freedom after surgery,” said the new study’s lead author, Kathryn Davis, MD, MSTR, an assistant professor of Neurology at Penn. “The aim of the study was to investigate whether a novel imaging method, developed at Penn, could use glutamate to localize and identify the epileptic lesions and map epileptic networks in these most challenging patients.”

“We theorized that if we could develop a technique which allows us to track the path of and make noninvasive measurements of glutamate in the brain, we would be able to better identify the brain lesions and epileptic foci that current methods miss,” said senior author Ravinder Reddy, PhD, a professor of Radiology and director of Penn’s Center for Magnetic Resonance and Optical Imaging.

Reddy’s lab developed the glutamate chemical exchange saturation transfer (GluCEST) imaging method, a very high resolution magnetic resonance imaging contrast method not available before now, to measure how much glutamate was in different regions of the brain including the hippocampi, two structures within the left and right temporal lobes responsible for short- and long-term memory and spatial navigation and the most frequent seizure onset region in adult epilepsy patients.

The study tested four patients with medication-resistant epilepsy and 11 controls. In all four patients, concentrations of glutamate were found to be higher in one of the hippocampi, and confirmatory methods (electroencephalography and magnetic resonance spectra) verified independently that the hippocampus with the elevated glutamate was located in the same hemisphere as the epileptic focus/lesion. Consistent lateralization to one side was not seen in the control group.

While preliminary, this work indicates the ability of GluCEST to detect asymmetrical hippocampal glutamate levels in patients thought to have nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy. The authors say this approach could reduce the need for invasive intracranial monitoring, which is often associated with complications, morbidity risk, and added expense.

“This demonstration that GluCEST can localize small brain hot spots of high glutamate levels is a promising first step in our research,” Davis said. “By finding the epileptic foci in more patients, this approach could guide clinicians toward the best therapy for these patients, which could translate to a higher rate of successful surgeries and improved outcomes from surgery or other therapies in this difficult disease.”

Source: Penn Medicine

Source: New method uses advanced noninvasive neuroimaging to localize and identify epileptic lesions

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[WEB SITE] Research provides insights for why some epilepsy patients continue to experience postoperative seizures

New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Brain, has highlighted the potential reasons why many patients with severe epilepsy still continue to experience seizures even after surgery.

Epilepsy continues to be a serious health problem and is the most common serious neurological disorder. Medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains the most frequent neurosurgically treated epilepsy disorder.

Many people with this condition will undergo a temporal lobe resection which is a surgery performed on the brain to control seizures. In this procedure, brain tissue in the temporal lobe is resected, or cut away, to remove the seizure focus.

Unfortunately, approximately one in every two patients with TLE will not be rendered completely seizure free after temporal lobe surgery, and the reasons underlying persistent postoperative seizures have not been resolved.

Reliable biomarkers

Understanding the reasons why so many patients continue to experience postoperative seizures, and identifying reliable biomarkers to predict who will continue to experience seizures, are crucial clinical and scientific research endeavours.

Researchers from the University’s Institute of Translational Medicine, led by Neuroimaging Lead Dr Simon Keller and collaborating with Medical University Bonn (Germany), Medical University of South Carolina (USA) and King’s College London, performed a comprehensive diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study in patients with TLE who were scanned preoperatively, postoperatively and assessed for postoperative seizure outcome.

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a MRI-based neuroimaging technique that provides insights into brain network connectivity.

The results of these scans allowed the researchers to examine regional tissue characteristics along the length of temporal lobe white matter tract bundles. White matter is mainly composed of axons of nerve cells, which form connections between various grey matter areas of the brain, and carry nerve impulses between neurons allowing communication between different brain regions.

Through their analysis the researchers could determine how abnormal the white matter tracts were before surgery and how the extent of resection had affected each tract from the postoperative MRI scans.

Surgery outcomes

The researchers identified preoperative abnormalities of two temporal lobe white matter tracts that are not included in standardised temporal lobe surgery in patients who had postoperative seizures but not in patients with no seizures after surgery.

The two tracts were in the ‘fornix’ area on the same side as surgery, and in the white matter of the ‘parahippocampal’ region on the opposite side of the brain.

The tissue characteristics of these white matter tracts enabled researchers to correctly identify those likely to have further seizures in 84% of cases (sensitivity) and those unlikely to have further seizures in 89% of cases (specificity). This is significantly greater than current estimates.

The researchers also found that a particular temporal lobe white matter tract called the ‘uncinate fasciculus’ was abnormal – and potentially involved in the generation of seizures – in patients with excellent and suboptimal postoperative outcomes.

However, it was found that significantly more of this tract was surgically resected/removed in the patients with an excellent outcome.

New insights

Dr Simon Keller, said: “There is scarce information on the prediction of postoperative seizure outcome using preoperative imaging technology, and this study is the first to rigorously investigate the tissue characteristics of temporal lobe white matter tracts with respect to future seizure classifications.

“Although there is some way to go before this kind of data can influence routine clinical practice, these results may have the potential to be developed into imaging prognostic markers of postoperative outcome and provide new insights for why some patients with temporal lobe epilepsy continue to experience postoperative seizures.”

Source: Research provides insights for why some epilepsy patients continue to experience postoperative seizures

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[WEB SITE] Brain surgery helps remove scar tissue causing seizures in epilepsy patients

By the time epilepsy patient Erika Fleck came to Loyola Medicine for a second opinion, she was having three or four seizures a week and hadn’t been able to drive her two young children for five years.

“It was no way to live,” she said.

Loyola epileptologist Jorge Asconapé, MD, recommended surgery to remove scar tissue in her brain that was triggering the seizures. Neurosurgeon Douglas Anderson, MD, performed the surgery, called an amygdalohippocampectomy. Ms. Fleck hasn’t had a single seizure in the more than three years since her surgery.

“I’ve got my life back,” she said. “I left my seizures at Loyola.”

Surgery can be an option for a minority of patients who do not respond to medications or other treatments and have epileptic scar tissue that can be removed safely. In 60 to 70 percent of surgery patients, seizures are completely eliminated, and the success rate likely will improve as imaging and surgical techniques improve, Dr. Anderson said.

Traditionally, patients would have to try several medications with poor results for years or decades before being considered for surgery, according to the Epilepsy Foundation. “More recently, surgery is being considered sooner,” the foundation said. “Studies have shown that the earlier surgery is performed, the better the outcome.” (Ms. Fleck is a service coordinator for the Epilepsy Foundation North/Central Illinois Iowa and Nebraska.)

Dr. Asconapé said Ms. Fleck was a perfect candidate for surgery because the scar tissue causing her seizures was located in an area of the brain that could be removed without damaging critical structures.

Ms. Fleck experienced complex partial seizures, characterized by a deep stare, unresponsiveness and loss of control for a minute or two. An MRI found the cause: A small area of scar tissue in a structure of the brain called the hippocampus. The subtle lesion had been overlooked at another center.

Epilepsy surgery takes about three hours, and patients typically are in the hospital for two or three days. Like all surgery, epilepsy surgery entails risks, including infection, hemorrhage, injury to other parts of the brain and slight personality changes. But such complications are rare, and they pose less risk to patients than the risk of being injured during seizures, Dr. Asconapé said.

Loyola has been designated a Level Four Epilepsy Center by the National Association of Epilepsy Centers. Level Four is the highest level of specialized epilepsy care available. Level Four centers have the professional expertise and facilities to provide the highest level of medical and surgical evaluation and treatment for patients with complex epilepsy.

Loyola’s comprehensive, multidisciplinary Epilepsy Center offers a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to epilepsy and seizure disorders for adults and children as young as two years old. Pediatric and adult epileptologist consultation and state-of-the-art neuroimaging and electrodiagnostic technology are used to identify and assess complex seizure disorders by short- and long-term monitoring.

Source: Loyola University Health System

Source: Brain surgery helps remove scar tissue causing seizures in epilepsy patients

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[WEB SITE] Study investigates plasticity of motor representations in patients with brain tumors

Winner of the Brainlab Community Neurosurgery Award, Sandro Krieg, MD, presented his research, Plasticity of Motor Representations in Patients with Brain Lesions: a Navigated TMS Study, during the 2017 American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) Annual Scientific Meeting.

This study investigated the spatial distributions of motor representations in terms of tumor-induced brain plasticity by analyzing navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) motor maps derived from 100 patients with motor eloquently located brain tumors in or adjacent to the precentral gyrus (PrG).

The research evoked 8,774 motor potentials (MEPs) that were elicited in six muscles of the upper and lower extremity by stimulating four gyri in patients with five possible tumor locations. Regarding the MEP frequency of each muscle-gyrus subdivision per patient, the expected frequency was 3.53 (8,774 divided by 100 patients, further divided by six muscles and four gyri). Accordingly, the patient ratio for each subdivision was calculated by defining the per-patient minimum data points as three.

The tumor-location specific patient ratios were higher for frontal tumors in both gyri than for other tumor locations. This suggests that the finger representation reorganization in these frontal gyri, which corresponds to location of dorsal premotor areas, might be due to within-premotor reorganization rather than relocation of motor function from PrG into premotor areas one might expect from the Rolandic tumors. The research indicates that reorganization of the finger motor representations might be limited along the middle-to-dorsal dimension of the dorsal premotor areas (posterior MFG and SFG) and might not cross rostrally from the primary motor cortex (PrG) to the dorsal premotor cortex.

Source: Study investigates plasticity of motor representations in patients with brain tumors

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[WEB SITE] New wearable electronic device could revolutionise treatment for stroke patients

Stroke patients are starting a trial of a new electronic device to recover movement and control of their hand.

Neuroscientists at Newcastle University have developed the device, the size of a mobile phone, which delivers a series of small electrical shocks followed by an audible click to strengthen brain and spinal connections.

The experts believe this could revolutionise treatment for patients, providing a wearable solution to the effects of stroke.

Following successful work in primates and healthy human subjects, the Newcastle University team are now working with colleagues at the prestigious Institute of Neurosciences, Kolkata, India, to start the clinical trial. Involving 150 stroke patients, the aim of the study is to see whether it leads to improved hand and arm control.

Stuart Baker, Professor of Movement Neuroscience at Newcastle University who has led the work said: “We were astonished to find that a small electric shock and the sound of a click had the potential to change the brain’s connections. However, our previous research in primates changed our thinking about how we could activate these pathways, leading to our study in humans.”

Recovering hand control

Publishing today in the Journal of Neuroscience, the team report on the development of the miniaturised device and its success in healthy patients at strengthening connections in the reticulospinal tract, one of the signal pathways between the brain and spinal cord.

This is important for patients as when people have a stroke they often lose the major pathway found in all mammals connecting the brain to spinal cord. The team’s previous work in primates showed that after a stroke they can adapt and use a different, more primitive pathway, the reticulospinal tract, to recover.

However, their recovery tends to be imbalanced with more connections made to flexors, the muscles that close the hand, than extensors, those that open the hand. This imbalance is also seen in stroke patients as typically, even after a period of recuperation, they find that they still have weakness of the extensor muscles preventing them opening their fist which leads to the distinctive curled hand.

Partial paralysis of the arms, typically on just one side, is common after stroke, and can affect someone’s ability to wash, dress or feed themselves. Only about 15% of stroke patients spontaneously recover the use of their hand and arm, with many people left facing the rest of their lives with a severe level of disability.

Senior author of the paper, Professor Baker added: “We have developed a miniaturised device which delivers an audible click followed by a weak electric shock to the arm muscle to strengthen the brain’s connections. This means the stroke patients in the trial are wearing an earpiece and a pad on the arm, each linked by wires to the device so that the click and shock can be continually delivered to them.

“We think that if they wear this for 4 hours a day we will be able to see a permanent improvement in their extensor muscle connections which will help them gain control on their hand.”

Improving connections

The techniques to strengthen brain connections using paired stimuli are well documented, but until now this has needed bulky equipment, with a mains electric supply.

The research published today is a proof of concept in human subjects and comes directly out of the team’s work on primates. In the paper they report how they pair a click in a headphone with an electric shock to a muscle to induce the changes in connections either strengthening or weakening reflexes depending on the sequence selected. They demonstrated that wearing the portable electronic device for seven hours strengthened the signal pathway in more than half of the subjects (15 out of 25).

Professor Stuart Baker added: “We would never have thought of using audible clicks unless we had the recordings from primates to show us that this might work. Furthermore, it is our earlier work in primates which shows that the connections we are changing are definitely involved in stroke recovery.”

The work has been funded through a Milstein Award from the Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust.

The clinical trial is just starting at the Institute of Neurosciences, Kolkata, India. The country has a higher rate of stroke than Western countries which can affect people at a younger age meaning there is a large number of patients. The Institute has strong collaborative links with Newcastle University enabling a carefully controlled clinical trial with results expected at the end of this year.

A patient’s perspective

Chris Blower, 30, is a third year Biomedical Sciences student at Newcastle University and he had a stroke when he was a child after open heart surgery. He describes his thoughts on the research:

I had a stroke at the age of seven. The immediate effect was paralysis of the right-hand side of my body, which caused slurred speech, loss of bowel control and an inability to move unaided. Though I have recovered from these immediate effects, I am now feeling the longer term effects of stroke; slow, limited and difficult movement of my right arm and leg.

My situation is not unique and many stroke survivors have similar long-term effects to mine. Professor Baker’s work may be able to help people in my position regain some, if not all, motor control of their arm and hand. His research shows that, in stroke, the brains motor pathway to the spinal cord is damaged and that an evolutionarily older signal pathway could be ‘piggybacked’ and used instead. With electrical stimulation, exercise and an audible cue the brain can be taught to use this older pathway instead.

This gives me a lot of hope for stroke survivors. My wrist and fingers pull in, closing my hand into a fist, but with the device Professor Baker is proposing my brain could be re-taught to use my muscles and pull back, opening my hand out. The options presented to me so far, by doctors, have been Botox injections and surgery; Botox in my arm would weaken the muscles closing my hand and allow my fingers to spread, surgery would do the same thing by moving the tendons in my arm. Professor Baker’s electrical stimulations is certainly a more appealing option, to me, as it seems to be a permanent solution that would not require an operation on my arm.

I was invited to look around the animal house and observe a macaque monkey undergoing a test and this has made me think about my own stroke and the effect it has had on my life.

I have never seen anything like this before and I didn’t know what to expect. The macaque monkey that I observed was calmly carrying out finger manipulation tests while electrodes monitored the cells of her spinal cord.

Although this procedure requires electrodes to be placed into the brain and spine of the animal, Professor Baker explained how the monkey had been practicing and learning this test for two years before the monitoring equipment was attached. In this way the testing has become routine before it had even started and the animal was in no pain or distress, even at the sight of a stranger (me).

The animals’ calm, placid temperaments carry over to their living spaces; with lots of windows, natural light and high up spaces the macaques are able to see all around them and along the corridors. This means that they aren’t feeling threatened when people approach and are comfortable enough that even a stranger (me, again) can approach and say ‘hello’.

From my tour of the animal house at the Institute of Neuroscience I saw animals in calm, healthy conditions, to which the tests were just a part of their daily routine. Animal testing is controversial but I think that the work of Professor Baker and his team is important in helping people who have suffered stroke and other life-changing trauma to regain their independence and, often, their lives.

Source: Newcastle University

Source: New wearable electronic device could revolutionise treatment for stroke patients

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[WEB SITE] Study shows continuous electrical stimulation suppresses seizures in patients with epilepsy.

When surgery and medication don’t help people with epilepsy, electrical stimulation of the brain has been a treatment of last resort. Unfortunately, typical approaches, such as vagal nerve stimulation or responsive nerve stimulation, rarely stop seizures altogether. But a new Mayo Clinic study in JAMA Neurology shows that seizures were suppressed in patients treated with continuous electrical stimulation.

Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted. In the study, 13 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy were deemed unsuitable for resective surgery, which removes a portion of the brain — usually about the size of a golf ball — that was causing seizures. When patients are evaluated for surgery, a grid of electrical contacts is placed on the brain to record seizures and interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). IEDs are electrical discharges that occur intermittently during normal brain function, and have been used as markers to locate portions of brain affected by epilepsy.

In the study, the grid of electrical contacts was used for stimulation at levels the patient would not notice. If the stimulation provided clinical benefit to the patient, this temporary grid was replaced with more permanent contacts that could offer continuous stimulation.

Ten of the 13 patients, 77 percent, reported improvement for both epilepsy severity and life satisfaction. The majority of patients experienced more than 50 percent reduction in seizures, and 44 percent were free of disabling seizures. The reduction in IED rate occurred within minutes of initiating stimulation.

“This study suggests that subthreshold cortical stimulation is both effective clinically and reduces interictal epileptiform discharges,” says lead author Brian Lundstrom, M.D., Ph.D., a neurology epilepsy fellow at Mayo Clinic. “We think this approach not only provides an effective treatment for those with focal epilepsy but will allow us to develop ways of assessing seizure likelihood for all epilepsy patients. It would be of enormous clinical benefit if we could personalize treatment regimens for individual patients without waiting for seizures to happen.”

During seizures, abnormal electrical activity in the brain sometimes results in loss of consciousness. For people with epilepsy, seizures severely limit their ability to perform tasks where even a momentary loss of consciousness could prove disastrous — driving a car, swimming or holding an infant, for example. Approximately 50 million people worldwide have epilepsy, according to the World Health Organization.

Seizures sometimes have been compared to electrical storms in the brain. Seizure signs and symptoms may include:

•Temporary confusion
•A staring spell
•Uncontrollable jerking movements of the arms and legs
•Loss of consciousness or awareness

Treatment with medications or surgery can control seizures for about two-thirds of people with epilepsy. However, when drug-resistant focal epilepsy occurs in an area of the brain that controls speech, language, vision, sensation or movement, resective surgery is not an option.

“For people who have epilepsy that can’t be treated with surgery or medication, effective neurostimulation could be a wonderful treatment option,” Dr. Lundstrom says.

The risks of subthreshold cortical stimulation are relatively minimal and include typical infection and bleeding risks as well as the possibility that the stimulation would not be subthreshold and would be noticed by the patient, Dr. Lundstrom says. The authors note that further investigation is needed to quantify treatment effect and examine the effect mechanism. The authors plan to examine the efficacy of this approach in a prospective clinical trial.

This study represents ongoing efforts to restore normal function to epileptic brain tissue by using neurostimulation. Other efforts are aimed at understanding the physiologic changes that chronic stimulation produces in brain tissue.

Source: Study shows continuous electrical stimulation suppresses seizures in patients with epilepsy

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[Abstract] The withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs in patients with low-grade and anaplastic glioma.

Abstract

Introduction: The withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in World Health Organization (WHO) grade II-III glioma patients with epilepsy is controversial, as the presence of a symptomatic lesion is often related to an increased risk of seizure relapse. However, some glioma patients may achieve long-term seizure freedom after antitumor treatment, raising questions about the necessity to continue AEDs, particularly when patients experience serious drug side effects.
Areas covered: In this review, we show the evidence in the literature from 1990-2016 for AED withdrawal in glioma patients. We put this issue into the context of risk factors for developing seizures in glioma, adverse effects of AEDs, seizure outcome after antitumor treatment, and outcome after AED withdrawal in patients with non-brain tumor related epilepsy.
Expert commentary: There is currently scarce evidence of the feasibility of AED withdrawal in glioma patients. AED withdrawal could be considered in patients with grade II-III glioma with a favorable prognosis, who have achieved stable disease and long-term seizure freedom. The potential benefits of AED withdrawal need to be carefully weighed against the presumed risk of seizure recurrence in a shared decision-making process by both the clinical physician and the patient.

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Source: The withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs in patients with low-grade and anaplastic glioma – Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics –

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