Posts Tagged Swallowing

[WEB SITE] Parenting After Brain Injury

Parenting After Brain Injury

Parenting is a challenging life role for all people, yet one of the most valued roles within society. Brain Injury frequently occurs at a life stage where people are yet to complete their parenting responsibilities. For people with acquired brain injury (ABI), facing cognitive, physical, communication, behavioural and psychological challenges, parenting can present complex challenges. In addition, persons with ABI often face societal and environmental barriers. These fact sheets have been developed to assist parents with an ABI and their partners to improve their knowledge and skills to meet the ongoing challenges of parenting. family walking together
little girl finger painting boy doing his homework two little girls arguing

Encouraging your
Developing Child

Setting Routines

Managing Behaviour

Other Useful Parenting Website Links and Resources

Parenting Fact Sheet References and Acknowledgements
Return to Support for Families

Contact ABIOS
abios@health.qld.gov.au

Last updated: 20 March 2017

via Parenting After Brain Injury | Queensland Health

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[Abstract] Sensing motion and muscle activity for feedback control of functional electrical stimulation: Ten years of experience in Berlin

Abstract

After complete or partial paralysis due to stroke or spinal cord injury, electrical nerve stimulation can be used to artificially generate functional muscle contractions. This technique is known as Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES). In combination with appropriate sensor technology and feedback control, FES can be empowered to elicit also complex functional movements of everyday relevance. Depending on the degree and phase of impairment, the goal may be temporary support in a rehabilitation phase, e.g. during re-learning of gait after a stroke, or permanent replacement/support of lost motor functions in form of assistive devices often referred to as neuro-prostheses.

In this contribution a number of real-time capable and portable approaches for sensing muscle contractions and motions are reviewed that enable the realization of feedback control schemes. These include inertial measurement units (IMUs), electromyography (EMG), and bioimpedance (BI). This contribution further outlines recent concepts for movement control, which include e.g. cascaded control schemes. A fast inner control loop based on the FES-evoked EMG directly controls the amount of recruited motor units. The design and validation of various novel FES systems are then described that support cycling, walking, reaching, and swallowing. All methods and systems have been developed at the Technische Universität Berlin by the Control Systems Group within the last 10 years in close cooperation with clinical and industrial partners.

Source: Sensing motion and muscle activity for feedback control of functional electrical stimulation: Ten years of experience in Berlin – ScienceDirect

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