Posts Tagged Travel

[WEB SITE] AIRBNB NOW PROVIDES 24 ACCESSIBILITY RELATED FILTERS FOR TRAVELERS WITH DISABILITIES

An image depicting a person in a wheelchair, a person with crutches, and a person sitting on a sofa inside a house, basically highlighting people with disabilities staying at an airbnb location.

More often than not, people with disabilities have to call up hotels or other places where they are staying beforehand, asking whether the room they will be staying in has suitable accommodations for them. In many cases, travelers face difficulties because of lack of accessibility features, which leaves them with a not so satisfactory experience. In order to provide reasonable accommodations to travelers with disabilities, AirBnb has introduced a set of 24 filters that will help them find homes that will make their stay worthwhile, provide them a lot more independence, and allow them to enjoy their vacation a lot more with the least amount of frustration.

If you go to AirBnb.com now, and search for “Homes” (accessible filters don’t show up for anything besides homes, like experience, restaurant, etc.), you will be provided with a new section called “accessibility” that lists the following filters:

Entering the home

• Step-free access
• Wide doorway
• Well lit path to entrance
• Flat path to front door
Getting around
• Wide hallways clearance Hallways at least 36″ (90cm) wide.
• Elevators If needed, contact hosts about the width.

Bedroom

• Step-free access
• Wide doorway
• Accessible-height bed
• Wide clearance to bed
• Electric profiling bed

Bathroom

• Step-free access
• Wide doorway
• Roll-in shower
• Bathtub with shower chair
• Accessible-height toilet
• Wide clearance to shower, toilet
• Fixed grab bars for shower
• Handheld shower head
• Shower chair

Common areas

• Step-free access
• Wide entryway

Parking

• Disabled parking spot There is a city-approved parking spot or a parking space at least 8ft (2.4m) wide.

However, getting to these filters may be just a bit tricky. Here’s how you get to them.

In the search box, type a location you plan to visit. Make sure to search for “Homes”.

type a location in the search box and make sure to choose homes Once the search results appear, click “more filters”.

click more filters to get to all the accessibility section

 

Under more filters, look for the Accessibility section and then click “choose home features”.

under Accessibility, click choose home features.

This is where you will see a list of 24 accessibility related filters. Choose the ones you need for your stay, and click Save. Your search results will be updated now.

choose all filters you require under "accessibility needs".

 

To see what accommodations a specific listing provides, click on it and scroll to the Accessibility section.

 

And there you have it. AirBnb’s filters are very specific, and can help you find a home that will meet your exact needs in terms of accessibility. Next time you travel, give these filters a try, and let us know how they worked out for you!

Source: Fast Company

via AirBnb Now Provides 24 Accessibility Related Filters For Travelers With Disabilities – Assistive Technology Blog

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[BLOG POST] Flying with a brain injury: my first long flight – Finding a new normal

Flying is my least favourite mode of transportation. Unfortunately it’s also the most convenient way to travel outside of Europe.

After my brain injury I was very curious about whether or not I’d still be able to fly (by myself). This called for an experiment.

Trying out flying

My first flight was a year and a half after my brain injury. At that time I could handle far less compared to the situation now. I had far less energy and got overstimulated very easily. Or maybe I had yet to discover how I should handle the ‘new me’.

So I avoided places with a lot of people. As fifteen minutes in a busy place would deteriorate my speech, thinking and balance quickly. Flying thus was written of in advance.

Luckily someone told me about the special assistence you can request when you plan to fly. This service makes it easier for people with any kind of disability to travel by plane. Once requested in advance, someone will escort you all the way into the plane. Which means that you get a lot faster through the airport and can save some precious energy. This service made flying suddenly a possibility.

And as a result I had two succesful flights within Europe. Which meant that it was time for the next step. To take a long flight and to try it without any kind of assistance.

A ten hour flight

That long flight was my flight to Sri Lanka last week. This time, not the airport but the flight itself was the most challenging. In the airport I had my earplugs, noise cancelling headphones and sunglasses and could hide out in a quiet corner. I even made a reservation for an airport lounge to rest in, which almost made me forget I was at an airport.

In the plane however, you can’t leave. Blocking out the world is a whole lot harder if there’s nowhere for you to go. This made the flight challenging, thought the last three hours of turbulance might also be to blame. Still I learned some lessons for my next flight in five weeks.

Know your triggers

I always find travel days extremely stressful. Nine out of ten times this culminates in a panic attack. This time was no different. Thankfully I recognised I was having a panic attack early on, so I could do something about it.

Follow your gut

If you notice that you stress yourself out over something, try and do something about it. I kept chaecking my watch every other minute, because I was afraid to be late. After an hour of annoying myself I finally decided to just go to the airport way too early. Looking back I should have done that earlier.

Plan your route

Nowadays, I think you can find the map of almost all airports online. This means that you can plan where to go in advance. Knowing where the lounges, quiet areas or prayer rooms are located beforehand can give you some piece of mind. Once you’ve passed security at the airport you already know the shortest way to where you plan to rest.

Keep a choice of distractions ready

Once you’re seated in the plane, it’s a matter of sitting it through. Of waiting until the plane has landed and you can get off. I discovered that I can’t read or watch tv on a plane. My mp3 player is therefore filled with different kinds of music. Music to sleep, to distract or to cancel out other noises. Make sure you have the option of distractions for the duration of the flight.

Keep yourself hydrated

Any time you get offered a drink on the plane, take it. Not only will it help you to stay hydrated (so don’t pick an alcoholic drink) it’ll force you to go to the toilet. In other words to stand up and walk around.

After care

The second or third day after the flight, I’ll feel the consequences. So listen to your body. If you need to sleep for 12 hours, do that. If you crave sugary or salty snacks, have those. Flying is hard and challenging, so take some recovery days into account and allow yourself some rest.

– I can only speak from my own exprience, so do check with your doctor if you have specific requirements to take into account when flying –

What do you do when you fly? Do you have or need something special that really helps you?

via Flying with a brain injury: my first long flight – Finding a new normal

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[BLOG POST] Safety Nets: Travel After Brain Injury

There’s so much out there that beckons—family, friends, ethnic textiles, and, more recently, the writers’ world. I am compelled to answer the call—all the calls! I reject the invalid role that my bloody brain repeatedly tries to thrust on me.

In order to live a full life, I’ve had to learn to set up safety nets wherever I go.

Before the brain injury, I had no difficulty living a fast-paced life. I combined a full-time job with a variety of extra curricular activities including time-consuming hobbies, such as weaving and dragon boating. Travel was an integral part of my life, with trips to conferences, workshops, and with family and friends at home and abroad.

Now, in the wake of my injury, I can’t do nearly as much. Tasks that in my past life were a matter of course, such as grocery shopping and driving, deplete my resources. Travel now drains me, especially when it involves flying. Contending with the high volumes of sensory input streaming in at airports and in flight wears me out.

I’ve had to learn to apply coping mechanisms and compensation techniques to function with my damaged brain. Though pacing myself to prevent debilitating fatigue would seem easy to apply, for me, it is one of the hardest adjustments I’ve had to implement. When I travel, it’s especially difficult.

When I’m outside my home territory, having less control over the agenda hampers any attempts to slow down. Also, I don’t want people to worry. I don’t want to call attention to myself. I don’t want to miss out, and I don’t want to slow others down.

Another obstacle in my way is that future events, including possible sources of trouble, now mean less to me. As far as I’m concerned, much of the future is abstract. It’s as if the wiring between cause and effect, between my notion of past and future, is faulty.

Trips often don’t seem real until I actually land at the destination. As a result, planning and preparations don’t make sense. I usually pack for an upcoming trip at the last moment, and when I finally get to it, I have to force myself to do it. In my mind, there’s no good reason for me to undertake a task that now feels so overwhelming in its complexity. Since the injury, poor organizational skills and the difficulties in managing high volumes of data—figuring out what I need to pack, how to arrange it in my luggage, what bags should I take—are daunting.

In time, as I healed, I became better able to manage my bloody brain. I learned to set myself a list of unbreakable rules that help me prepare for trips. A side effect of my brain injury, a strong OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) streak, has a surprising benefit: I have a list of basics I need to pack that I follow religiously, plus a set way to organize items in my suitcase.

My rules also include arranging for safety nets.

I knew the trip to visit my family in Israel would be grueling. I knew better than to trust my own judgment. If I hoped to convince my bloody brain to cooperate, I needed someone to watch out for me, to keep me out of trouble.

Before the trip to Israel, I spoke to my sister about my anxiety. She understood and empathized—she’s walked in my shoes. She too has cavernous angiomas that have bled. Like me, she is often tempted to outpace herself. But unlike me she is assertive, and when all hell breaks loose with her bloody brain, she knows to take it easy and to rest despite outside pressure. I, on the other hand, have trouble protecting myself, no matter how bad shape I’m in.

During the trip, she shielded me from ambitious plans from well-meaning family and friends who wanted me to participate in activities that would drain my resources. And she also shielded me from myself; I was excited to spend time with my family, not wanting to cause concern, reluctant to disappoint, and too willing to go along with the crowd.

Unfortunately, the safety nets don’t always work. Some of the changes that the bloody brain brought about get in the way. I am more emotionally volatile now, and often, my emotions drive me instead of reason. In addition, my impaired memory and poor grasp of the connection between cause and effect often results in me downplaying potential difficulties.

During my first couple of days in Israel, I didn’t listen to my sister’s advice. I was sure I knew better and that I would be fine. Even after the bloody brain lashed out at me with a crippling headache, I felt that she was being overprotective. I did finally listen to her—not because I fully agreed with her, but because I didn’t want to upset her.

As my brain rewired post-injury, my memory and my ability to make connections improved. As my self-awareness grew and I became more in-tune with myself and the bloody brain, planning ahead was easier.

But even now, more than a decade since the surgeries, when I realize that common sense says, “wait a bit, take a break, don’t do so much,” there is still a niggling little voice inside me telling me that it’s not really necessary. I still overstretch myself, though nowhere near as much as I used to. I’m doing better now, I’ll be fine.

Now, where did I put that safety net?

via Safety Nets: Travel After Brain Injury | Brain Blogger

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[BLOG POST] 12 Epilepsy Travel Tips

Epilepsy Talk

Traveling has never been easy, and people with epilepsy have always had to think twice about safety and managing medications while traveling. Since September 11, 2001, taking a trip has become even more difficult for people with epilepsy and their family members.

There are several reasons for this. Increased security is producing closer scrutiny of medications carried on flights, more questions regarding implanted Vagus Nerve Stimulators and increased concerns about the possibility of having a seizure during a flight.

And not everyone knows what a seizure is or what to do. They may not recognize certain behaviors as being caused by a seizure. They may just think that a person who is confused during a seizure will become agitated or attack someone. Or in a mistaken attempt to help or detain, they may try to restrain that person.

So it’s mandatory to have written information from your GP or neurologist…

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