Posts Tagged Unity3D

[Abstract] User Experience Evaluation of an Interactive Virtual Reality-Based System for Upper Limb Rehabilitation – IEEE Conference Publication

Abstract

This article evaluates the usability of an interactive virtual reality system for the recovery of hand and wrist mobility by means of the LeapMotion device and the Unity3D graphics engine. Through the programmed interfaces, the proposed VR system allows the patient to correctly complete established medical protocols via exercise routines with audio and video feedback. The usability evaluation of the VR system was carried out using the VRUSE model in an experiment. This model was utilized to design a survey consisting of 10 items, where each item represents a model factor. The survey was applied in the experiment in which 30 patients participated. The obtained results showed that the VRUSE factors of the proposed VR system for rehabilitation are significantly related to its overall use, with factor correlation values lower than 0,005. Patients participating in the experiment consider that the interactive virtual reality-based system for upper limb rehabilitation is usable. Additionally, it was proved that the rehabilitation environments programmed in the Unity 3D graphics engine allows patients to comply precisely with the established medical protocols, driving them to a progressive movement recovery of the affected limb.

 

via User Experience Evaluation of an Interactive Virtual Reality-Based System for Upper Limb Rehabilitation – IEEE Conference Publication

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[Abstract] Gesture Interaction and Augmented Reality based Hand Rehabilitation Supplementary System – IEEE Conference Publication

Abstract:

The existing systems of hand rehabilitation always design different rehabilitation medical apparatus and systems according to the patients’ needs. This kind of system always contain problems such as complexity, using only single training programs, inconvenient to wear and high cost. For these reasons, this paper uses gesture recognition technology and augmented reality technology to design a simple and interactive hand rehabilitation supplementary system. The system uses a low-cost, non-contact device named Leap Motion as the input device, and Unity3D as the development engine, realizing three functional modules: conventional training, AR game training and auxiliary functions. This rehabilitation training project with different levels of difficulty increases the fun and challenge of the rehabilitation process. Users can use the system to assist the treatment activity of hand rehabilitation anytime and anywhere. The system, which has good application value, can also be used in other physical rehabilitation fields.

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[Conference paper] Virtual Environments for Motor Fine Skills Rehabilitation with Force Feedback – Abstract+References

Abstract

In this paper, it is proposed an application to stimulate the motor fine skills rehabilitation by using a bilateral system which allows to sense the upper limbs by ways of a device called Leap Motion. This system is implemented through a human-machine interface, which allows to visualize in a virtual environment the feedback forces sent by a hand orthosis which was printed and designed in an innovative way using NinjaFlex material, it is also commanded by four servomotors that eases the full development of the proposed tasks. The patient is involved in an assisted rehabilitation based on therapeutic exercises, which were developed in several environments and classified due to the patient’s motor degree disability. The experimental results show the efficiency of the system which is generated by the human-machine interaction, oriented to develop human fine motor skills.

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Source: Virtual Environments for Motor Fine Skills Rehabilitation with Force Feedback | SpringerLink

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[ARTICLE] Rehabilitation System for Stroke Patients using Mixed-Reality and Immersive User Interfaces – Full Text PDF

Abstract

The work presented in this paper addresses stroke, a disease costing the healthcare in Europe and USA over 3% of their entire healthcare expenditure, including inpatient treatments, outpatient hospital visits and long-term rehabilitation and care.

The StrokeBack project is a response to those needs offering an effective long term care and rehabilitation strategy for stroke patients, which would actively involve patients in the rehabilitation process while minimizing costly human support. The game based training system has been proposed allowing physicians to supervise the rehabilitation of patents at home. The proposed approach empowers patients and their caretakers to execute effectively rehabilitation protocols in their home settings, while leading physicians are able to monitor the rehabilitation progress remotely via Personal Health Record (PHR) system.

The increased rehabilitation speed and ability to perform training at home directly improves quality of life of patients.

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[ARTICLE] Serious Games for Stroke Rehabilitation Employing Immersive User Interfaces in 3D Virtual Environment – Full Text PDF

ABSTRACT

Stroke is a disease with very high socio-economic impact. In average, the healthcare expenditure cost for Strokes across different countries in Europe and USA exceeds 3% of their entire healthcare expenditure, including inpatient treatments, outpatient hospital visits and long-term rehabilitation and care. Therefore, there is an urgent need for devising an effective long-term care and rehabilitation strategy for stroke patients, which would actively involve patients in the rehabilitation process while minimizing costly human support. This paper reports on the ongoing developments of the serious gaming approach to an integrated rehabilitation training for post-stroke patients employing the Unity3D virtual reality environment combined with a hybrid of advanced media technologies and immersive user interfaces. The proposed approach empowers the patients and their caretakers for effective application of rehabilitation protocols in their home settings, while leading physicians are enabled to supervise the progress of the rehabilitation (and intervene if needed) through the use of Personal Health Record (PHR) system. The increased rehabilitation speed and ability to perform training at home directly improves quality of life of patients. The work described herein has been performed in the “StrokeBack” project co-funded by the European Commission under the Framework 7 Program in the ICT domain.

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