Posts Tagged upper limb

[ARTICLE] Home-based neurologic music therapy for arm hemiparesis following stroke: results from a pilot, feasibility randomized controlled trial – Full Text

 

Continue —> Home-based neurologic music therapy for arm hemiparesis following stroke: results from a pilot, feasibility randomized controlled trialClinical Rehabilitation – Alexander J Street, Wendy L Magee, Andrew Bateman, Michael Parker, Helen Odell-Miller, Jorg Fachner, 2017

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Figure 1. Study flow diagram. Data collection occurred at weeks 1, 6, 9, 15 and 18. Cross-over analysis required data from weeks 1, 6, 9 and 15.

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[ARTICLE] Robotic-assisted serious game for motor and cognitive post-stroke rehabilitation – Full Text PDF

 

Abstract

Stroke is a major cause of long-term disability that can cause motor and cognitive impairments. New technologies such as robotic devices and serious games are increasingly being developed to improve post-stroke rehabilitation. The aim of the present project was to develop a ROBiGAME serious game to simultaneously improve motor and cognitive deficits (in particular hemiparesis and hemineglect). In this context, the difficulty level of the game was adapted to each patient’s performance, and this individualized adaptation was addressed as the main challenge of the game development. The game was implemented on the REAplan end-effector rehabilitation robot, which was used in continuous interaction with the game. A preliminary feasibility study of a target pointing game was run in order to validate the game features and parameters. Results showed that the game was perceived as enjoyable, and that patients reported a desire to play the game again. Most of the targets included in the game design were realistic, and they were well perceived by the patients. Results also suggested that the cognitive help strategy could include one visual prompting cue, possibly combined with an auditory cue. It was observed that the motor assistance provided by the robot was well adapted for each patient’s impairments, but the study results led to a suggestion that the triggering conditions should be reviewed. Patients and therapists reported the desire to receive more feedback on the patient’s performances. Nevertheless, more patients and therapists are needed to play the game in order to give further and more comprehensive feedback that will allow for improvements of the serious game. Future steps also include the validation of the motivation assessment module that is currently under development.

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[Abstract] A Randomized Trial on the Effects of Attentional Focus on Motor Training of the Upper Extremity Using Robotics with Individuals after Chronic Stroke 

 

Highlights

  • Individuals with moderate-to-severe arm impairment after stroke improved motor control after engaging in high-repetition training
  • There were no differences between external focus or internal focus of attention on retention of motor skills after four weeks of arm training for individuals with stroke
  • Individuals with moderate-to-severe arm impairment may not experience the advantages of an external focus during motor training found in healthy individuals
  • Attentional focus is most likely not an active ingredient for retention of trained motor skills for individuals with moderate-to-severe arm impairment

Abstract

Objective

To compare the long-term effects of external focus (EF) versus internal focus (IF) of attention after 4-weeks of arm training. Design: Randomized, repeated measure, mixed ANOVA.

Setting

Outpatient clinic.

Participants

33 individuals with stroke and moderate-to-severe arm impairment living in the community (3 withdrawals).

Interventions

4-week arm training protocol on the InMotion ARM robot (12 sessions).

Main Outcome Measures

Joint independence, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and Wolf Motor Function Test measured at baseline, discharge, and 4-week follow-up.

Results

There were no between-group effects for attentional focus. Participants in both groups improved significantly on all outcome measures from baseline to discharge and maintained those changes at 4-week follow-up regardless of group assignment [Jt indep-EF, F(1.6, 45.4) = 17.74, p<.0005, partial η2=.39; Jt indep-IF, F(2, 56)= 18.66, p<.0005, partial η2=.40; FMA, F(2, 56) = 27.83, p<.0005, partial η2=.50 ; WMFT, F(2, 56) =14.05, p<.0005, partial η2=.35].

Conclusion

There were no differences in retention of motor skills between EF and IF participants four weeks after arm training, suggesting that individuals with moderate-to-severe arm impairment may not experience the advantages of an EF found in healthy individuals. Attentional focus is most likely not an active ingredient for retention of trained motor skills for individuals with moderate-to-severe arm impairment, whereas dosage and intensity of practice appear to be pivotal. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects of attentional focus for individuals with mild arm impairment.

Source: A Randomized Trial on the Effects of Attentional Focus on Motor Training of the Upper Extremity Using Robotics with Individuals after Chronic Stroke – Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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[Abstract] Effects of Transcranial direct current stimulation with sensory modulation on stroke motor rehabilitation: A randomized controlled trial  

 

Abstract

Objective

To test whether a multi-strategy intervention enhanced recovery immediately and longitudinally in patients with severe to moderate upper extremity (UE) paresis.

Design

Double-blind randomized controlled trial with placebo control.

Setting

An outpatient department of a local medical center.

Participants

People (n = 25) with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to 2 groups. Participants in the transcranial direct current stimulation with sensory modulation (tDCS-SM) and in the control group were 55.3±11.5 (n=14) and 56.9±13.5 (n=11) years old, respectively.

Interventions

8-week intervention. The tDCS-SM group received bilateral tDCS, bilateral cutaneous anesthesia, and high repetitions of passive movements on the paretic hand. The control group received the same passive movements but with sham tDCS and sham anesthesia. During the experiment, all participants continued their regular rehabilitation.

Main outcome measures

Voluntary UE movement, spasticity, UE function, and basic activities of daily living. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, at post-intervention, and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups.

Results

No significant differences were found between groups. However, there was a trend that the voluntary UE movement improved more in the tDCS-SM group than in the control group, with a moderate immediate effect (partial η2, ηp2 = 0.14, p = 0.07) and moderate long-term effects (ηp2 =0.17, p = 0.05 and ηp2 = 0.12, p = 0.10). Compared with the control group, the tDCS-SM group had a trend of a small immediate effect (ηp2 = 0.02 – 0.04) on reducing spasticity but no long-term effect. A trend of small immediate and long-term effects in favor of tDCS-SM was found on UE function and daily function recovery (ηp2= 0.02 – 0.09).

Conclusions

Accompanied with traditional rehabilitation, tDCS-SM had a non-significant trend of having immediate and longitudinal effects on voluntary UE movement recovery in patients with severe to moderate UE paresis after stroke, but its effects on spasticity reduction and functional recovery may be limited. (NCT01847157)

Source: Effects of Transcranial direct current stimulation with sensory modulation on stroke motor rehabilitation: A randomized controlled trial – Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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[Editorial] Rehabilitation and assistive robotics – Advances in Mechanical Engineering

It is estimated that in the European Union (EU) the proportion of the population aged over 65 years will rise from 17.1% in 2008 to 30% in 2060 and that the proportion of persons aged over 80 years will rise from 4.4% to 12.1% over the same period (EUROSTAT population projections). Neurological conditions, especially stroke, are a major cause of disability among older people. Incidence of a first stroke in Europe is about 1.1 million and prevalence about 6 million. Currently, about 75% of stroke sufferers survive 1 year after. This proportion will increase in the coming years due to steadily increasing quality in hyper-acute lifesaving practice, follow-up acute and sub-acute care, and lifelong management of these conditions. Despite these positive developments in stroke care, approximately 80% of stroke patients experience long-term reduced manual dexterity, a 72% of those affected by stroke suffer leg weakness, affecting walking, and half of all patients with neurological conditions are unable to perform everyday tasks. Rehabilitation and assistive robotics have the potential to change older people lives improving their recovery and/or supporting them to perform everyday tasks.

The purpose of this special collection is to provide an opportunity for researchers working in academy or industry to show their latest theoretical, technological, and experimental aspects of rehabilitation and assistive robotics. A total of eight articles have been accepted after a strict peer review process.

In the topic of rehabilitation robotics, Fraile et al. present an end-effector rehabilitation robot, a 2-degree-of-freedom planar robotic platform for upper limb rehabilitation in post-stroke patients. In addition, they describe the ergonomic mechanical design, the system control architecture, and the rehabilitation therapies that can be performed by the aforementioned rehabilitation robot. There are other two more papers included in this topic. In the first one, Diez et al. propose a novel multimodal robotic system for upper-limb neurorehabilitation therapies in physical environments, interacting with real objects. This system consists of an end-effector upper-limb rehabilitation robot, a hand exoskeleton, a gaze tracking system, an object tracking system, and electromyography measuring units. Their experimental results show that the proposed system is feasible and safe enough. Wrong detections in electromyography (EMG) are the main cause of failure; however, in the 97% of the trials, it still resulted in successful grasping and releasing. In the second one, Simonetti et al. present the design and development of a modular architecture for delivering upper limb robotic telerehabilitation with the CBM-Motus, a planar unilateral robotic machine. Their architecture allows a therapist to set a therapy session on his or her side and send it to the patient’s side with a standardized communication protocol; the user interacts with the robot that provides an adaptive assistance during the rehabilitation tasks. Moreover, the experimental results with seven healthy subjects show the reliability of the novel architecture and the capability to be easily tailored to the user’s needs with the chosen robotic device.

In the topic of robotic prosthetics, Barone et al. propose a multilevel control of an anthropomorphic robotic hand with prosthetic features. The novel approach is based on two distinct levels consisting of (1) a policy search learning algorithm combined with central pattern generators in the higher level and (2) a parallel force/position control managing slippage events in the lower level. Their experimental results demonstrate that the proposed control has the potential to adapt to changes in the environment and guarantees grasp stability, by avoiding object fall thanks to prompt slippage event detection. Moreover, Sekine et al. present the development of a shoulder prosthesis based on a hybrid actuation system composed of pneumatic elastic actuators (PEAs) and servo motors. Their results show that the joints with PEAs could absorb more impact force, which is very important for safe use, than with motors.

In this special collection, there are two papers in the field of wearable exoskeletons. In the first one, Ning et al. present the design and development of a power-assisted gait orthosis. The paper analysed the gait characteristics with crutches, designed the mechanical architecture, and optimized it using genetic algorithms. Moreover, the performance of the final design is verified under many external conditions, such as no-load, gait movement, long-term continuous movement, and load tests. In the second one, Zhang et al. propose a human–machine force interaction designing architecture for a load-carrying exoskeleton. Their experimental results show that the human–machine interaction force detection at the back and feet and the identification of different body modalities and movement intention are feasible. Moreover, the actual load on the human back is far less than the payload, which shows that their exoskeleton has good power-assisted effect.

The last paper included in this special collection is about a novel algorithm to estimate the instantaneous tremor parameters such as the time-varying dominant frequency in the case of nonsynchronous sampling and to distinguish the tremulous movement from the raw data. The experimental results reported by Wang et al. demonstrate that the proposed solution could detect the unknown dominant frequency and distinguish the tremor components with higher accuracy than the existing procedures.

Source: Rehabilitation and assistive roboticsAdvances in Mechanical Engineering – Nicolas Garcia-Aracil, Alicia Casals, Elena Garcia, 2017

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[Abstract] The Effect of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy on Spasticity and Motor Function of the Affected Arm in Patients with Chronic Stroke

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in a real-world clinical setting on spasticity and functional use of the affected arm and hand in patients with spastic chronic hemiplegia.

Method: A prospective consecutive quasi-experimental study design was used. Twenty patients with spastic hemiplegia (aged 22–67 years) were tested before and after 2-week modified CIMT in an outpatient rehabilitation clinic and at 6 months. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), active range of motion (AROM), grip strength, Motor Activity Log (MAL), Sollerman hand function test, and Box and Block Test (BBT) were used as outcome measures.

Results: Reductions (p<0.05–0.001) in spasticity (MAS) were seen both after the 2-week training period and at 6-month follow-up. Improvements were also seen in AROM (median change of elbow extension 5°, dorsiflexion of hand 10°), grip strength (20 Newton), and functional use after the 2-week training period (MAL: 1 point; Sollerman test: 8 points; BBT: 4 blocks). The improvements persisted at 6-month follow-up, except for scores on the Sollerman hand function test, which improved further.

Conclusion: Our study suggests that modified CIMT in an outpatient clinic may reduce spasticity and increase functional use of the affected arm in spastic chronic hemiplegia, with improvements persisting at 6 months.

Source: The Effect of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy on Spasticity and Motor Function of the Affected Arm in Patients with Chronic Stroke | Physiotherapy Canada

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[Abstract] Hand therapy interventions, outcomes, and diagnoses evaluated over the last 10 years: A mapping review linking research to practice

 

Abstract

Study Design

Mapping review.

Introduction

Although published literature and evidence to support medical practice is becoming more abundant, it is not known how well available evidence supports the full spectrum of hand therapy practice.

Purpose of the Study

The aim of this mapping review was to identify strengths and/or gaps in the available literature as compared with the hand therapy scope of practice to guide future research.

Methods

A systematic search and screening was conducted to identify evidence published from 2006 to 2015. Descriptive data from 191 studies were extracted, and the diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes used in the literature were compared with the hand therapy scope of practice.

Results

Osteoarthritis, tendon surgeries, and carpal tunnel syndrome were most frequently studied. Exercise, education, and orthotic interventions were most common, each used in more than 100 studies; only 12 studies used activity-based interventions. Primary outcome measures included range of motion, pain/symptoms, strength, and functional status.

Discussion

Abundant high-quality research exists for a portion of the hand therapy scope of practice; however, there is a paucity of evidence for numerous diagnoses and interventions.

Conclusions

More evidence is needed for complex diagnoses and activity-based interventions as well as behavioral and quality-of-care outcomes.

Source: Hand therapy interventions, outcomes, and diagnoses evaluated over the last 10 years: A mapping review linking research to practice – Journal of Hand Therapy

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[BOOK] Chapter 7: After Stroke Movement Impairments: A Review of Current Technologies for Rehabilitation – Full Text

 

 “Physical Disabilities – Therapeutic Implications”, book edited by Uner Tan, ISBN 978-953-51-3248-6, Print ISBN 978-953-51-3247-9, Published: June 14, 2017 under CC BY 3.0 license. © The Author(s)

Chapter 7: After Stroke Movement Impairments: A Review of Current Technologies for Rehabilitation

Abstract

This chapter presents a review of the rehabilitation technologies for people who have suffered a stroke, comparing and analyzing the impact that these technologies have on their recovery in the short and long term. The problematic is presented, and motor impairments for upper and lower limbs are characterized. The goal of this chapter is to show novel trends and research for the assistance and treatment of motor impairment caused by strokes.

1. Introduction

Stroke is the most common acquired neurological disease in the adult population worldwide (15 million every year [1]). Based on recently published studies, incidence of stroke in Europe at the beginning of the twenty-first century ranged from 95 to 290/100,000 per year [37]. Between 2000 and 2010, the relative rate of stroke deaths dropped by 35.8% in the United States and other countries. However, each year stroke affects nearly 800,000 individuals, becoming the first cause of chronic disability and the third cause of death. It is a global public health problem worldwide that generates a significant burden of illness for healthy life years lost due to disability and premature death.

One-third of stroke survivors achieve only a poor functional outcome 5 years after the onset of stroke. Although there is great progress in the management of acute stroke, most of the care to reduce dependence on post-stroke patients depends on rehabilitation. Optimal functional recovery is the ultimate goal of neurorehabilitation after acute brain injury, mainly by optimizing sensorimotor performance in functional actions. New brain imaging techniques are making it clear that the neurological system is continually remodeling throughout life and after damage through experience and learning in response to activity and behavior.

Rehabilitation in stroke patients seeks to minimize the neurological deficit and its complications, encourage family, and facilitate social reintegration of the individual to ultimately improve their quality of life. Stroke rehabilitation is divided into three phases. The acute phase usually extends for the 1st weeks, where patients get treated and stabilized in a hospital and get stabilized. Subacute phase (1–6 months) is the phase where the rehabilitation process is more effective for recovering functions. In chronic phase (after 6 months), rehabilitation is meant to treat and decrease motor sequels.

The potential ability of the brain to readapt after injury is known as neuroplasticity, which is the basic mechanism underlying improvement in functional outcome after stroke. Therefore, one important goal of rehabilitation of stroke patients is the effective use of neuroplasticity for functional recovery [38].

As mentioned before, neural plasticity is the ability of nervous system to reorganize its structure, function, and connections in response to training. The type and extent of neural plasticity is task—specific, highly time-sensitive and strongly influenced by environmental factors as well as motivation and attention.

Current understanding of mechanisms underlying neural plasticity changes after stroke stems from experimental models as well as clinical studies and provides the foundation for evidence-based neurorehabilitation. Evidence accumulated during the past 2 decades together with recent advances in the field of stroke recovery clearly shows that the effects of neurorehabilitation can be enhanced by behavioral manipulations in combination with adjuvant therapies that stimulate the endogenous neural plasticity.

Nowadays, a large toolbox of training-oriented rehabilitation techniques has been developed, which allows the increase of independence and quality of life of the patients and their families [39]. The recovery of function has been shown to depend on the intensity of therapy, repetition of specified-skilled movements directed toward the motor deficits and rewarded with performance-dependent feedback.

The use of technological devices not only helps to increase these aspects but also facilitates the work of therapists in order to enhance the abilities of patients and a higher level of functional recovery. They create environments with a greater amount of sensorimotor stimuli that enhance the neuroplasticity of patients, translating into a successful functional recovery. The use of technological devices can transfer the effects of rehabilitation to the different environments where patients spend their daily life allowing a favorable social reintegration. In this chapter, a review of technologies for rehabilitation of mobility in upper and lower extremity is presented.[…]

Continue —>  After Stroke Movement Impairments: A Review of Current Technologies for Rehabilitation | InTechOpen

Figure 1. Mechanical treatment devices. (a) Armeo Spring and (b) Saebo ReJoyce.

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[ARTICLE] Neural Plasticity in Moderate to Severe Chronic Stroke Following a Device-Assisted Task-Specific Arm/Hand Intervention – Full Text

Currently, hand rehabilitation following stroke tends to focus on mildly impaired individuals, partially due to the inability for severely impaired subjects to sufficiently use the paretic hand. Device-assisted interventions offer a means to include this more severe population and show promising behavioral results. However, the ability for this population to demonstrate neural plasticity, a crucial factor in functional recovery following effective post-stroke interventions, remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate neural changes related to hand function induced by a device-assisted task-specific intervention in individuals with moderate to severe chronic stroke (upper extremity Fugl-Meyer < 30). We examined functional cortical reorganization related to paretic hand opening and gray matter (GM) structural changes using a multimodal imaging approach. Individuals demonstrated a shift in cortical activity related to hand opening from the contralesional to the ipsilesional hemisphere following the intervention. This was driven by decreased activity in contralesional primary sensorimotor cortex and increased activity in ipsilesional secondary motor cortex. Additionally, subjects displayed increased GM density in ipsilesional primary sensorimotor cortex and decreased GM density in contralesional primary sensorimotor cortex. These findings suggest that despite moderate to severe chronic impairments, post-stroke participants maintain ability to show cortical reorganization and GM structural changes following a device-assisted task-specific arm/hand intervention. These changes are similar as those reported in post-stroke individuals with mild impairment, suggesting that residual neural plasticity in more severely impaired individuals may have the potential to support improved hand function.

Introduction

Nearly 800,000 people experience a new or recurrent stroke each year in the US (1). Popular therapies, such as constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), utilize intense task-specific practice of the affected limb to improve arm/hand function in acute and chronic stroke with mild impairments (2, 3). Neuroimaging results partially attribute the effectiveness of these arm/hand interventions to cortical reorganization in the ipsilesional hemisphere following training in acute and mild chronic stroke (4). Unfortunately, CIMT requires certain remaining functionality in the paretic hand to execute the tasks, and only about 10% of screened patients are eligible (5), thus disqualifying a large population of individuals with moderate to severe impairments. Recently, studies using device-assisted task-specific interventions specifically targeted toward moderate to severe chronic stroke reported positive clinical results (68). However, these studies primarily focus on clinical measures, but it is widely accepted that neural plasticity is a key factor for determining outcome (911). Consequently, it remains unclear whether moderate to severe chronic stroke [upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment (UEFMA) < 30] maintains the ability to demonstrate neural changes following an arm/hand intervention.

Neural changes induced by task-specific training have been investigated widely using animal models (12). For instance, monkeys or rodents trained on a skilled reach-to-grasp task express enlarged representation of the digits of the hand or forelimb in primary motor cortex (M1) following training as measured by intracortical microstimulation (13, 14). Additionally, rapid local structural changes in the form of dendritic growth, axonal sprouting, myelination, and synaptogenesis occur (1518). Importantly, both cortical and structural reorganization corresponds to motor recovery following rehabilitative training in these animals (19, 20).

The functional neural mechanisms underlying effective task-specific arm/hand interventions in acute and chronic stroke subjects with mild impairments support those seen in the animal literature described above. Several variations of task-specific combined arm/hand interventions, including CIMT, bilateral task-specific training, and hand-specific robot-assisted practice, have shown cortical reorganization such as increased sensorimotor activity and enlarged motor maps in the ipsilesional hemisphere related to the paretic arm/hand (2124). These results suggest increased recruitment of residual resources from the ipsilesional hemisphere and/or decreased recruitment of contralesional resources following training. Although the evidence for a pattern of intervention-driven structural changes remains unclear in humans, several groups have shown increases in gray matter (GM) density in sensorimotor cortices (25), along with increases in fractional anisotropy in ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST) (26) following task-specific training in acute and chronic stroke individuals with mild impairments.

The extensive nature of neural damage in moderate to severe chronic stroke may result in compensatory mechanisms, such as contralesional or secondary motor area recruitment (27). These individuals show increased contralesional activity when moving their paretic arm, which correlates with impairment (28, 29) and may be related to the extent of damage to the ipsilesional CST (30). This suggests that more impaired individuals may increasingly rely on contralesional corticobulbar tracts such as the corticoreticulospinal tract to activate the paretic limb (29). These tracts lack comparable resolution and innervation to the distal parts of the limb, thus sacrificing functionality at the paretic arm/hand (31). Since this population is largely ignored in current arm/hand interventions, it is unknown whether an arm/hand intervention for these more severely impaired post-stroke individuals will increase recruitment of residual ipsilesional corticospinal resources. These ipsilesional CSTs maintain the primary control of hand and finger extensor muscles (32) and are thus crucial for improved hand function. Task-specific training assisted by a device may reengage and strengthen residual ipsilesional corticospinal resources by training distal hand opening together with overall arm use.

The current study seeks to determine whether individuals with moderate to severe chronic stroke maintain the ability to show cortical reorganization and/or structural changes alongside behavioral improvement following a task-specific intervention. We hypothesize that following a device-assisted task-specific intervention, moderate to severe chronic stroke individuals will show similar functional and structural changes as observed in mildly impaired individuals, demonstrated by (i) a shift in cortical activity related to paretic hand opening from the contralesional hemisphere toward the ipsilesional hemisphere and (ii) an increase in GM density in sensorimotor cortices in the ipsilesional hemisphere.[…]

Continue —> Frontiers | Neural Plasticity in Moderate to Severe Chronic Stroke Following a Device-Assisted Task-Specific Arm/Hand Intervention | Neurology

Figure 5. Statistical maps of gray matter (GM) density changes across all patients. Significant increases (red/yellow) and decreases (Blue) in GM density are depicted on sagittal, coronal, and axial sections (left to right) on Montreal Neurological Institute T1 slices. Sections show the maximum effect on (A) ipsilesioned M1/S1, (B) contralesional M1/S1, and (C) ipsilesional thalamus. Les indicates the side of the lesioned hemisphere. Color maps indicate the t values at every voxel. A statistical threshold was set at p < 0.001 uncorrected.

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[BLOG POST] Home After a Stroke: Reviewing Virtual Reality Rehab

Between September 2011 and May 2017 Dean published 173 posts about the use of virtual reality to provide rehab for stroke survivors.  The results for the hand are depressing.  For six years research focused on a subject’s ability to touch an object on the screen so the computer can move an object or make it disappear.  Enjoying these quick reactions is not enough to justify the cost of this expensive equipment.  It was a good place to start 6 years ago, but progress towards useful gains is disappointing.  Stroke survivors want to manipulate objects with their hand.

There is a glimmer of hope.  Gauthier (1) used video games that make stroke survivors do more than use their shoulder and elbow to reach forward and side to side.  These games require forearm and wrist motions.  This may not sound exciting but these motions orient our hand to the many different positions objects rest in. The photo shows the forearm is halfway between palm up and palm down so the hand can pick up a glass.  Cocking the wrist means the rim of the glass is not pointed at the ceiling but at the person’s mouth.

Unfortunately, Gauthier selected stroke survivors who already had a few degrees of active forearm and wrist movement.  How can subjects make the leap from just reaching to turning their hand palm up to catch a parachute on a video screen?  My OT gave me exercises that helped me regain forearm and wrist motions.  These small motions have made me more independent.  For example, I can turn my hand halfway between palm up and palm down to grab my cane so my sound hand can catch the door before the person in front of me lets it slam shut.  I picture stroke survivors practicing forearm and wrist motions and then immediately trying to turn their hand palm up so they can turn over a card on the computer screen. Fun + repetition is good.
1. Gauthier L, et al. Video game rehabilitation for outpatient stroke (VIGoROUS): protocol for a multi-center comparative effectiveness trial of in-home gamified constraint-induced movement therapy for rehabilitation of chronic upper extremity hemiparesis. BMC Neurology. 2017;17-109. doi:10.1186/s12883-017-0888-0.

Source: Home After a Stroke: Reviewing Virtual Reality Rehab

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