Posts Tagged User satisfaction

[ARTICLE] A systematic review on existing measures for the subjective assessment of rehabilitation and assistive robot devices – Full Text PDF

Yiannis Koumpouros

Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Department of Informatics, Ag. Spyridonos, Aigaleo – 12243, Athens, Greece

email: ykoump@teiath.gr

Abstract:

The objective of the current study is to identify and classify outcome measures currently used for the assessment of rehabilitation or assistive robot devices. Such measures are critical to be used during the development phase of any such product.

We conducted a systematic review of the literature using the PubMed, Medline, CIRRIE and Scopus databases for studies that assessed rehabilitation or assistive robot devices from 1980 through January 2016. In all, 31 articles met all inclusion criteria. Tailor-made questionnaires were the most commonly used tool at 66.7% (22/31), while the great majority 93.9% (29/31) of the studies used nonvalidated instruments.

The study reveals the absence of a standard scale which makes it difficult to compare the results from different researchers. Most of them either use only objective measures (e.g. clinical or technical measurements) or develop not valid questionnaires. There is a great need therefore, for a valid and reliable instrument to be available for use by the intended end users for the subjective assessment of robot devices.

The study concludes by identifying two scales that have been validated in general assistive technology devices and could support the scope of subjective assessment in rehabilitation or assistive robots (with limited however coverage), and a 2 new one called PYTHEIA, recently published. The latter intends to close the gap and help researchers and developers to evaluate, assess and produce products that satisfy the real needs of the end users.

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[ARTICLE] Preparing a neuropediatric upper limb exergame rehabilitation system for home-use: a feasibility study | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

Fig. 1 The portable YouGrabber system. a A patient playing the Airplane game on the portable YouGrabber system. b The complete data glove with sensor-“box”, bending sensors, and vibrating units attached to the size fit neoprene glove. c The complete equipment packed for “take away”

Abstract

Background

Home-based, computer-enhanced therapy of hand and arm function can complement conventional interventions and increase the amount and intensity of training, without interfering too much with family routines. The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility and usability of the new portable version of the YouGrabber® system (YouRehab AG, Zurich, Switzerland) in the home setting.

Methods

Fifteen families of children (7 girls, mean age: 11.3y) with neuromotor disorders and affected upper limbs participated. They received instructions and took the system home to train for 2 weeks. After returning it, they answered questions about usability, motivation, and their general opinion of the system (Visual Analogue Scale; 0 indicating worst score, 100 indicating best score; ≤30 not satisfied, 31–69 average, ≥70 satisfied). Furthermore, total pure playtime and number of training sessions were quantified. To prove the usability of the system, number and sort of support requests were logged.

Results

The usability of the system was considered average to satisfying (mean 60.1–93.1). The lowest score was given for the occurrence of technical errors. Parents had to motivate their children to start (mean 66.5) and continue (mean 68.5) with the training. But in general, parents estimated the therapeutic benefit as high (mean 73.1) and the whole system as very good (mean 87.4). Children played on average 7 times during the 2 weeks; total pure playtime was 185 ± 45 min. Especially at the beginning of the trial, systems were very error-prone. Fortunately, we, or the company, solved most problems before the patients took the systems home. Nevertheless, 10 of 15 families contacted us at least once because of technical problems.

Conclusions

Despite that the YouGrabber® is a promising and highly accepted training tool for home-use, currently, it is still error-prone, and the requested support exceeds the support that can be provided by clinical therapists. A technically more robust system, combined with additional attractive games, likely results in higher patient motivation and better compliance. This would reduce the need for parents to motivate their children extrinsically and allow for clinical trials to investigate the effectiveness of the system.

Keywords

Data glove, Pediatrics ,Neurorehabilitation, Upper extremities ,YouGrabber, Tele-rehabilitation, Game-based, Cerebral palsy, Children and adolescents, Clinical utility, User satisfaction

Continue —>  Preparing a neuropediatric upper limb exergame rehabilitation system for home-use: a feasibility study | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

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