Posts Tagged vibration

[Abstract] Upper limb tendon/muscle vibration in persons with subacute and chronic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis

 

INTRODUCTION: Results of several recent studies suggest that tendon/muscle vibration treatment may improve motor performance and reduce spasticity in individuals with stroke. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of tendon/muscle vibration treatment for upper limb functional movements in persons with subacute and chronic stroke.

EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: We searched MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Wiley) from inception to September 2017. We included randomized controlled trials comparing upper limb tendon/muscle vibration to sham treatment/rest or conventional interventions in persons with subacute and chronic stroke. Our primary outcome was upper limb functional movement at the end of the treatment period.

EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: We included eight trials, enrolling a total of 211 participants. We found insufficient evidence to support a benefit for upper limb functional movement (standard mean difference -0.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.74 to 0.10, I2 25%, 6 trials, 135 participants). Movement time for reaching tasks significantly decreased after using tendon/muscle vibration (standard mean difference -1.20, 95% CI -2.05 to -0.35, I2 65%, 2 trials, 74 participants). We also found that tendon/muscle vibration was not associated with a significant reduction in spasticity (4 trials).

CONCLUSIONS: Besides shorter movement time for reaching tasks, we did not identify evidence to support clinical improvement in upper limb functional movements after tendon/muscle vibration treatment in persons with subacute and chronic stroke. A small number of trials were identified; therefore, there is a need for larger, higher quality studies and to consider the clinical relevance of performance-based outcome measures that focus on time to complete a functional movement such as a reach.

via Upper limb tendon/muscle vibration in persons with subacute and chronic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis – European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2019 October;55(5):558-69 – Minerva Medica – Journals

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[Abstract] DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW APPROACH TO WRIST REHABILITATION

Abstract

Wrist injuries are a very common type of pathology that can compromise most daily
tasks. Conventional therapy is dependent on the availability of physiotherapists as well as devices
designed for this purpose. Conventional devices do not accompany the patient throughout their
rehabilitation process, requiring their constant replacement. Vibratory therapies emerged in recent
years and have demonstrated several benefits in this area. However, there are few vibratory
devices designed for wrist rehabilitation. In this paper, we propose two different portable and
active models for wrist rehabilitation based on vibratory therapy for wrist rehabilitation. The first
model has a cylindrical shape and the second model has a dumbbell shape. The results obtained
showed that vibratory therapy can assist the wrist rehabilitation because it promoted
improvements in joint amplitude gain in all wrist movements. Furthermore, the second device
demonstrated higher joint gains than the first device. In addition, the results obtained from the
measurement of accelerations demonstrate that the natural frequencies of both devices are
adequate for wrist and forearm rehabilitation as well as the mode of vibration. There are
differences between what the simulations predicted and what was obtained in practice in terms of
natural frequency values.

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[ARTICLE] Whole-Body Vibration in Horizontal Direction for Stroke Rehabilitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial – Full Text

Abstract

Background

As most of the existing whole-body vibration (WBV) training programs provide vertical or rotatory vibration, studies on the effects of horizontal vibration have rarely been reported. The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of WBV in the horizontal direction on balance and gait ability in chronic stroke survivors.

Material/Methods

This study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. Twenty-one stroke survivors were randomly allocated into 2 groups (whole-body vibration group [n=9] and control group [n=12]). In the WBV group, WBV training in the horizontal direction was conducted for 6 weeks, and a conventional rehabilitation for 30 min, 3 days per week for a 6-week period, was conducted in both the WBV and control groups. Outcome variables included the static balance and gait ability measured before training and after 6 weeks.

Results

On comparing the outcome variables before and after training in the WBV group, significant differences were observed in the cadence and single support time of gait ability. However, there were no significant differences in other variables, including velocity, step length, stride length, and double support time. In addition, after training, no significant differences in all variables were observed between the 2 groups.

Conclusions

The results of this study suggest that WBV training in the horizontal direction has few positive effects on balance and gait function in chronic stroke survivors. However, further investigation is needed to confirm this.

Background

Stroke survivors suffer from central nervous system damage, with sensory and motor system damage, which leads to consequences such as decreased control of muscle tone, delay in muscle contraction, and absence of selective movement [1,2]. In addition, stroke survivors have unstable balance and poor gait ability, which naturally limits their activities of daily living and participation in the community, while losing independence [2,3]. Consequently, the first priority for stroke survivors is recovery of independent activities, and for this, the recovery of balance in a standing posture and gait abilities is essential.

For functional recovery of stroke survivors, various methods have been suggested [4], and whole-body vibration (WBV) is a relatively novel form of exercise intervention that could improve functional recovery [5]. WBV involves the use of a vibrating platform in a static position or while performing dynamic movements. In previous studies, it was suggested that WBV training could improve physical functions. Castrogiovanni et al. [6] reported that a multi-component training, including aerobic activity and other types of training (resistance and/or strength exercises), is the best kind of exercise for improving bone mass and bone metabolism in elderly people and especially in osteopenic and osteoporotic women. With regard to whole-body vibration training, studies have suggested that it could be a valid method. Pichler et al. [7] reported that mechanical stimulation such as treadmill and vibration stimulation training inhibits the activity of RANKL in osteoporosis. In addition, Musumeci et al. [8] suggested that, in certain diseases such as osteoporosis, mechanical stimulation including treadmill and vibration platform training could be a possible therapeutic treatment. Based on their results, they proposed the hypothesis that physical activity could also be used as a therapeutic treatment for cartilage diseases such as osteoarthritis. Van Nes et al. [9] introduced WBV as a means of somatic sensory stimulation for functional recovery of stroke survivors. They also reported that somatosensory stimulation through WBV can significantly improve muscle performance, balance, and daily activities. Balance, defined as the ability to maintain the center of pressure (COP) on the support surface in given circumstances, can be held through adjusted harmony of visual, vestibular, and somatic sensory system [10], and vibration stimulation is reported to cause small changes in the skeletal muscle length of the human body and affect the motor neurons to facilitate activation of the spinal reflexes through short spindle-motor neuron connections [11].

Balance is a major component required for controlling or maintaining the COP in mobility and locomotion in which the support surface changes [12]. The information on changes of the support surface along with the biomechanic information needed for movement control is passed on to the central nervous system by muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs, and joint receptors in the proprioception sense; thus, they have a very important role in controlling balance [13,14]. In addition, Muller and Redfern [15] performed a comparative analysis of the latency of beginning muscle activity by measuring electromyogram (EMG) activation degree of muscle strength of the lower extremities caused by movement of the COP while the support surface moved back and forth. Consequently, the latency of activation of the tibialis anterior muscle was rapid on the support surface moving forward and that of the soleus muscle was rapid when moving backward. Given these reports, for recovery of balance ability, the horizontal vibration in all directions might be needed more than the vertical or rotatory vibration provided by the original WBV training. Additionally, our bodies maintain standing posture using ankle strategy, hip strategy, or both [16]. The ankle strategy, which is the postural control strategy that starts first in postural sway, enables immediate recovery of standing balance through ankle joint muscle contraction [16]. Horizontal vibration, therefore, may significantly activate not only stimulation of somatosensory, but also ankle strategy or hip strategy.

However, since most of the existing WBV training programs provide only vertical or rotatory vibrations, studies on effects of horizontal vibrations have been rarely reported. Accordingly, the present study examined the effects of horizontal WBV in an antero-posterior or medio-lateral direction on balance and gait abilities of stroke survivors.[…]

Continue —> https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6408868/#__sec6title

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Figure 2
Whole-body vibration in horizontal direction.

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[Abstract] Upper limb tendon/ muscle vibration in persons with subacute and chronic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis

 

INTRODUCTION: Results of several recent studies suggest that tendon/muscle vibration treatment may improve motor performance and reduce spasticity in individuals with stroke. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of tendon/muscle vibration treatment for upper limb functional movements in persons with subacute and chronic stroke.
EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: We searched MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Wiley) from inception to September 2017. We included randomized controlled trials comparing upper limb tendon/muscle vibration to sham treatment/rest or conventional interventions in persons with subacute and chronic stroke. Our primary outcome was upper limb functional movement at the end of the treatment period.
EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: We included eight trials enrolling a total of 211 participants. We found insufficient evidence to support a benefit for upper limb functional movement (standard mean difference -0.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.74 to 0.10, I2 25%, 6 trials, 135 participants). Movement time for reaching tasks significantly decreased after using tendon/muscle vibration (standard mean difference -1.20, 95% CI -2.05 to -0.35, I2 65%, 2 trials, 74 participants). We also found that tendon/muscle vibration was not associated with a significant reduction in spasticity (4 trials).
CONCLUSIONS: Besides shorter movement time for reaching tasks, we did not identify evidence to support clinical improvement in upper limb functional movements after tendon/muscle vibration treatment in persons with subacute and chronic stroke. A small number of trials were identified; therefore, there is a need for larger, higher quality studies and to consider the clinical relevance of performance-based outcome measures that focus on time tocomplete a functional movement such as a reach.

via Upper limb tendon/ muscle vibration in persons with subacute and chronic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis – European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2019 Mar 11 – Minerva Medica – Journals

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[BOOK] New Vibratory Device for Wrist Rehabilitation – Innovation, Engineering and Entrepreneurship – Google Books

New Vibratory Device for Wrist Rehabilitation

H Puga – Innovation, Engineering and Entrepreneurship, 2018
Wrist injuries are very common in most of the population, specially bone fractures,
but also other pathologies such as tendinitis and neurological diseases. When the
wrist is injured, their flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation and pronation …

 

via Innovation, Engineering and Entrepreneurship – Google Books

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[Dissertation] Brain Mechanism for Enhanced Hand Function with Remote Sensory Stimulation – Full Text PDF

ABSTRACT

BRAIN MECHANISM FOR ENHANCED HAND FUNCTION WITH REMOTE SENSORY STIMULATION

by

Kishor Lakshmi Narayanan

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 2016

Under the Supervision of Professor Mohammad Habibur Rahman

The neurological bases for remote vibration enhanced sensory feedback and motor function are yet poorly understood. The purpose of this dissertation was to identify and examine the effect of vibration on finger tactile sensation in healthy adults and how imperceptible random vibration applied to the wrist changes cortical activity for fingertip sensation and precision grip. In a series of studies on healthy adults, white-noise vibration was applied to one of four locations (dorsum hand by the second knuckle, thenar and hypothenar areas, and volar wrist) at one of four intensities (zero, 60%, 80%, and 120% of the sensory threshold for each vibration location), while the fingertip sensation, the smallest vibratory signal that could be perceived on the thumb and index fingertip pads, was assessed. Vibration intensities significantly affected the fingertip sensation (p<.01) in a similar manner for all four vibration locations. Specifically, vibration at 60% of the sensory threshold improved the thumb and index fingertip tactile sensation (p<.01), while vibration at 120% of the sensory threshold degraded the thumb and index fingertip tactile sensation (p<.01) and the 80% vibration did not significantly change the fingertip sensation (p>.01), all compared with the zero vibration condition. The next step was to examine the cortical activity for this vibration-enhanced fingertip sensation. We measured somatosensory evoked potentials to assess peak-to-peak response to light touch of the index fingertip with applied wrist vibration versus without. We observed increased peak-to-peak somatosensory evoked potentials with wrist vibration, especially with increased amplitude of the later component for the somatosensory, motor, and premotor cortex with wrist vibration. These findings corroborate an enhanced cortical-level sensory response motivated by vibration. It is possible that the cortical modulation observed here is the result of the establishment of transient networks for improved perception. Finally, we examined the effect of imperceptible vibration applied to the wrist on cortical control for precision grip. We measured β-band power to assess peak-to-peak response while subjects performed precision pinch with wrist vibration versus without. We observed increased peak-to-peak β-band power amplitude with wrist vibration, especially with event-related synchronization for the prefrontal, sensorimotor, motor, premotor, and supplementary motor areas with vibration. The enhanced motor function may possibly be a result of higher recalibration following movement and faster motor learning.

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