Posts Tagged Video

[VIDEO] NAO performs physical rehabilitation with CP and OBPP patients (P2) – YouTube

The patient is a male of 9 years old with Brachial Plexus Palsy and a degree of dystonia where muscle contractions cause him twisting and unintentional movements.

This video belongs to a set of evaluations of our autonomous robotic system in the Hospital Virgen del Rocio (Sevilla, Spain) while performing rehabilitation sessions with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy (OBPP) patients.

Planning and Learning Group

http://www.plg.inf.uc3m.es

More info Therapist: http://www.therapist.uma.es

via NAO performs physical rehabilitation with CP and OBPP patients (P2) – YouTube

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[VIDEO] MOTORE++ – A new Rehabilitation Robot for the upper limb – YouTube

ECHORD Plus PlusΔημοσιεύτηκε στις 12 Μαΐ 2017
The goal of this experiment was to continue the development of a rehabilitation robot named MOTORE to restore upper limb functionality. MOTORE++ improved the existing MOTORE rehabilitation device by improving the system to the level which is required for commercialization: it works without any links or wire and it is the first robot small enough to be easily carried and as such suitable for in-home rehabilitation. A proprietary software was developed with several exercises and a wide range of exercise parameters. Moreover, a patient database permits the customization of the therapy. The commercial application of this technological development will allow building smaller and lighter robotic systems which are able to interact with patients in hospitals, in retirement homes or are even suitable for in-home therapy. The improved prototype was tested in home-based rehabilitation sessions.

via MOTORE++ – A new Rehabilitation Robot for the upper limb – YouTube

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[VIDEO] Your Brain on Depression: Neuroscience, Animated – YouTube

Depression is a multifaceted and insidious disorder, nearly as complex as the brain itself. As research continues to suggest, the onset of depression can be attributed to an interplay of the many elements that make us human—namely, our genetics, the structure and chemistry of our brains, and our lived experience. Second only, perhaps, to the confounding mechanics of anesthesia, depression is the ultimate mind-body problem; understanding how it works could unlock the mysteries of human consciousness.

Emma Allen, a visual artist, and Dr. Daisy Thompson-Lake, a clinical neuroscientist, are fascinated by the physical processes that underlie mental health conditions. Together, they created Adam, a stop-motion animation composed of nearly 1,500 photographs. The short film illuminates the neuroscience of depression while also conveying its emotive experience.

“It was challenging translating the complicated science into an emotional visual story with scenes that would flow smoothly into each other,” Allen told The Atlantic.

“One of the most complex issues we had to deal with,” added Thompson-Lake, “is that there no single neuroscientific explanation for depression…While scientists agree that there are biological and chemical changes within the brain, the actual brain chemistry is very unique to the individual—although, of course, we can see patterns when studying large numbers of patients.” As a result, Allen and Thompson-Lake attempted a visual interpretation of depression that does not rely too heavily on any one explanation.

The film’s first sequence depicts the brain’s vast network of neuronal connections. Neurons communicate via synapses, across which electrical and chemical signals are exchanged. In a depressed patient’s brain, some of these processes are inefficient or dysfunctional, as the animation illustrates. Next, we see a positron emission tomography (PET) scan of a depressed brain, demarcated by darkened areas. Finally, the animation shows activity in the hippocampus and the frontal lobe. Abnormalities in the activity of both of these areas of the brain have been implicated in depression by recent research.

For Allen, one of the main objectives in creating Adam was to help dispel the notion that depression is a character flaw. “A common misconception is that the person is at fault for feeling this way, and that to ask for help is a weakness or embarrassing,” Allen said. “But depression has a physical component that needs treating.”

“The shame surrounding mental health still exists,” Allen continued. “In fact, in the case of Kate Spade, it was reported that she was concerned about the stigma her brand might face if this were made public.”

And who, exactly, is Adam? “Daisy lost a friend to suicide,” said Allen, “so the film is named in his memory.”

“Adam” was directed by animator Emma Allen and neuroscientist Daisy Thompson-Lake. It is part of The Atlantic Selects, an online showcase of short films from independent creators, curated by The Atlantic.

 

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[VIDEO] Your Brain on Depression

Depression is a multifaceted and insidious disorder, nearly as complex as the brain itself. As research continues to suggest, the onset of depression can be attributed to an interplay of the many elements that make us human—namely, our genetics, the structure and chemistry of our brains, and our lived experience. Second only, perhaps, to the confounding mechanics of anesthesia, depression is the ultimate mind-body problem; understanding how it works could unlock the mysteries of human consciousness.
Emma Allen, a visual artist, and Dr. Daisy Thompson-Lake, a clinical neuroscientist, are fascinated by the physical processes that underlie mental health conditions. Together, they created Adam, a stop-motion animation composed of nearly 1,500 photographs. The short film illuminates the neuroscience of depression while also conveying its emotive experience.
“It was challenging translating the complicated science into an emotional visual story with scenes that would flow smoothly into each other,” Allen told The Atlantic.
“One of the most complex issues we had to deal with,” added Thompson-Lake, “is that there no single neuroscientific explanation for depression…While scientists agree that there are biological and chemical changes within the brain, the actual brain chemistry is very unique to the individual—although, of course, we can see patterns when studying large numbers of patients.” As a result, Allen and Thompson-Lake attempted a visual interpretation of depression that does not rely too heavily on any one explanation.
The film’s first sequence depicts the brain’s vast network of neuronal connections. Neurons communicate via synapses, across which electrical and chemical signals are exchanged. In a depressed patient’s brain, some of these processes are inefficient or dysfunctional, as the animation illustrates. Next, we see a positron emission tomography (PET) scan of a depressed brain, demarcated by darkened areas. Finally, the animation shows activity in the hippocampus and the frontal lobe. Abnormalities in the activity of both of these areas of the brain have been implicated in depression by recent research.
For Allen, one of the main objectives in creating Adam was to help dispel the notion that depression is a character flaw. “A common misconception is that the person is at fault for feeling this way, and that to ask for help is a weakness or embarrassing,” Allen said. “But depression has a physical component that needs treating.”
“The shame surrounding mental health still exists,” Allen continued. “In fact, in the case of Kate Spade, it was reported that she was concerned about the stigma her brand might face if this were made public.”
And who, exactly, is Adam? “Daisy lost a friend to suicide,” said Allen, “so the film is named in his memory.”

 

Author: Emily Buder

via Your Brain on Depression – The Atlantic

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[VIDEO] tutorial tDCS Soterix – YouTube

via (2) tutorial tDCS Soterix – YouTube

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[VIDEO] Research Workshop on Fundamentals and Applications of tDCS – YouTube

via (12) Research Workshop on Fundamentals and Applications of tDCS – YouTube

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[BLOG POST] AlterEgo: A New Wearable Device Responds To Your Thoughts – Video

A man seen wearing the wearable alterego on this face.

Ever said “you read my mind!” to someone who said the same thing you were just about to say? Researchers at MIT are making this a reality. A new wearable invented at MIT, called AlterEgo, is a device that sits on your ear, loops behind it, and attaches to your face. What’s special about this device is that it recognizes non-verbal prompts – things that you are thinking in your mind, and responds to them. This wearable device also attaches to a computer system that translates your thoughts into a command that is understood by it, thus prompting a response.

There are certain locations on your face that generate neuromuscular signals when you think about something. Researchers working on AlterEgo worked on identifying those locations – first they found that 7 different location were consistently able to distinguish internal verbalization, and with more experiments, they started finding comparable results with just four locations, which meant that the wearable wasn’t going all over your face with electrodes and being intrusive. After identifying those signals, they sent them to a computer that could translate and analyze them, and eventually associating them with different words. The wearable responds, either in the form of an action, or in the form of an audible answer. For example, you may be looking at your Netflix screen on your TV and wanting to browse through all of the movies displayed. Just thinking “right” would make the Netflix screen to navigate to the next displayed movie. Similarly, just saying “what is the time?” to yourself in your mind will make the wearable say the time out loud to you. What’s also interesting is that the wearable uses bone conducting headphones which means that your ear is still available to you for any other conversation you may be having with another person. The researchers also tried it with a game of Chess (the user would just think about the opponent’s move and the wearable would respond by suggesting the next move), and with basic arithmetic operations.

Currently, AlterEgo has the accuracy of 92%, and responds to around 20 words. The researchers are confident that this wearable would learn more words with more training data, and would scale up very soon in the near future.

Of course, this wearable can be used by any non-verbal person, and someone who cannot operate a device (and control the device with just their thought), but other applications of this device could be communicating with others in extremely loud environments (air traffic personnel  directing flights on the tarmac or at a concert) where there would be no need to speak – just your thoughts would be communicated to the other person!

Watch the video below to learn more about the current prototype and go to the source links to learn more about AlterEgo.

Source: The Verge, MIT News

 

via AlterEgo: A New Wearable Device Responds To Your Thoughts – Assistive Technology Blog

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[VIDEO] Epilepsy is manageable but beware the risks

A person with a seizure disorder may put lives of others at risk. Photo: Thato Mahlangu.

Being epileptic doesn’t mean you cannot drive a car, according to Epilepsy SA.

It is, however, important for people with epilepsy to understand that the decision to drive is a great responsibility since they could be putting the public at risk if they lose consciousness while behind the wheel.

It was not only a seizure itself that could cause an accident but the anticonvulsant medication epilepsy sufferers take could result in drowsiness and lead to loss of control of consciousness.

ALSO READ: Urgent search launched for man with epilepsy

“Not all people who appear to have seizures have epilepsy,” said ER24 chief medical officer Dr. Robyn Holgate.

“About ten percent of the population will have seizures, and only one percent will be diagnosed with epilepsy.”

Holgate said that while some epilepsies were genetic there were many causes.

The condition can be traced to various factors, including:

– Head trauma as a result of a car accident or other injury.

– Brain conditions such as brain tumours or strokes can cause epilepsy. (Stroke is a leading cause of epilepsy in adults older than age 35.)

– Infectious diseases, such as meningitis, AIDS, and viral encephalitis.

– Prenatal injury. Before birth, babies are sensitive to brain damage that could be caused by things such as an infection in the mother, poor nutrition or oxygen deficiencies.

Watch the video here:

The myths about epilepsy that should be debunked, include:

– Swallowing one’s tongue during a seizure.

“It is physically impossible to swallow your tongue. If left on your back, your tongue may obstruct your airway, but it’s not possible to swallow your tongue,” she said.

– You should force something into victim’s mouth when they are having a seizure.

“Absolutely not. This could damage teeth, the patient’s jaw and gums. The correct first aid technique is to gently roll somebody onto their side and put something soft under their head (such as a pillow). You should also never restrain somebody having a seizure.”

– Epilepsy is contagious.

“You cannot catch epilepsy from another person.”

– Only kids get epilepsy.

ALSO READ: Why did 94 psychiatric patients have to die?

“Epilepsy may affect people of any age, but in our older population, the causes may be as a result of health rather than genetics.”

– People with epilepsy should not be in jobs with any responsibility.

“Epilepsy is a chronic medical problem, which can be managed with medication. When this condition is well-managed, those suffering from epilepsy can be active and valuable members of society. Some people may be able to identify what triggers their epilepsy. This may include lack of sleep, illness, stress, bright or flashing lights, caffeine or alcohol, and skipping meals. Where a trigger is identified, these triggers should be avoided if possible.”[…]

 

via VIDEO: Epilepsy is manageable but beware the risks | Centurion Rekord

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[VIDEO] Third Thumb Changes the Prosthetics Game – YouTube

 

London-based product designer, Dani Clode designed a third thumb to change the way people think about prosthetics. Clode believes that prosthetics extent a wearer’s ability. They shouldn’t be regarded as a replacement to part of the human body. The third thumb is made from a series of interconnected parts: a hand piece, an attachment, cables, motors, and two Bluetooth controllers. See more from Dani Clode: http://daniclodedesign.com/

https://www.instagram.com/dani_clode/

via Third Thumb Changes the Prosthetics Game – YouTube

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[VIDEO] Rehabilitation centre Reade in Amsterdam on Functional Electrical Stimulation – YouTube

 https://youtu.be/A1526ngFUOw

Published on Mar 7, 2018

Want to know more? Visit our website: http://www.berkelbike.co.uk/fes

 

via Rehabilitation centre Reade in Amsterdam on Functional Electrical Stimulation – YouTube

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