[Abstract] Preliminary results of testing the recoveriX system on stroke patients 

Abstract

Motor imagery based brain-computer interfaces (BCI) extract the movement intentions of subjects in real-time and can be used to control a cursor or medical devices. In the last years, the control of functional electrical stimulation (FES) devices drew researchers’ attention for the post-stroke rehabilitation field. In here, a patient can use the movement imagery to artificially induce movements of the paretic arms through FES in real-time.

Five patients who had a stroke that affected the motor system participated in the current study, and were trained across 10 to 24 sessions lasting about 40 min each with the recoveriX® system. The patients had to imagine 80 left and 80 right hand movements. The electroencephalogram (EEG) data was analyzed with Common Spatial Patterns (CSP) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and a feedback was provided in form of a cursor on a computer screen. If the correct imagination was classified, the FES device was also activated to induce the right or left hand movement.

In at least one session, all patients were able to achieve a maximum accuracy above 96%. Moreover, all patients exhibited improvements in motor function. On one hand, the high accuracies achieved within the study show that the patients are highly motivated to participate into a study to improve their lost motor functions. On the other hand, this study reflects the efficacy of combining motor imagination, visual feedback and real hand movement that activates tactile and proprioceptive systems.

Source: O174 Preliminary results of testing the recoveriX system on stroke patients – Clinical Neurophysiology

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Effect of reciprocal pedaling exercise on cortical reorganization and gait in stroke patients

Abstract

Objectives

Functional impairment of the lower limb is a major complication in stroke patients. The involvement of the cortex in pedaling has critical clinical implications to control of cyclical motor functions in patients with damaged cortical structures or cortical pathways.The study aimed at determining the effect of reciprocal pedaling exercise (RPE) on the gait and cortical reorganization in the stroke patients.

Methods

Forty patients suffering from stroke with hemiparesis will be included in this study. They were divided to Group I treated by training for lower limb muscles of the affected side. While Group II were treated by the same program as group I in addition to RPE. Quantitative EEG (QEEG) was carried for all patients before and after the treatment programs. The midline frontal, central and parietal regions (Fz, Cz and Pz) were studied for evidence of plasticity induced by RPE.

Results

Neuroplasticity was noticed among patients of group II in the midline frontal region (Fz) and to a lesser extent the midline central region (Cz).

Discussion

The rhythmic and reciprocal nature of cycling motion permits patients to generate timely symmetrical and reciprocal powers from both limbs required for locomotion.

Conclusions

Leg cycling exercise, and thus RPE, is a rehabilitation program that improves the function of ambulation in stroke patients.

Significance

Post stroke physical therapy can utilize RPE for better rehabilitation.

Source: S186 Effect of reciprocal pedaling exercise on cortical reorganization and gait in stroke patients – Clinical Neurophysiology

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] The effect of bilateral arm training on motor areas excitability in chronic stroke patients

Abstract

Objectives

Physical therapy exercises that do not enhance motor areas neuroplasticity lead to motor impairment especially at the upper extremity (UE) in the chronic stroke patients. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of using bilateral arm training on motor areas excitability (neuroplasticity) in the chronic stroke patients.

Methods

Thirty male chronic stroke patients with moderate impairment of UE were assigned into two equal groups. The changes of motor areas excitability (neuroplasticity) were assessed before and after arm training by spectral analysis of mapping electroencephalogram (EEG). Delta, theta, alpha, beta 1 and beta 2 waves were recorded. The equation which was used to detect the neural plasticity and the changing at motor areas excitability was dividing the fast wave/slow waves or detecting the ratio of mean frequency of (beta 2 + beta 1 + alpha/theta + delta).

Results

Patients in group 1 (G1) received unilateral arm training and patients in group 2 (G2) received bilateral arm training. The Results: Showed significant increase in the excitability (neuroplasticity) at (F4 + F8) and (C4) motor areas in G2 comparing to G1 (p!9 .006) and (p!9 .036 ) respectively.

Discussion

Bimanual training leads to activation of extensive networks in both hemispheres.

Conclusions

It was concluded that bilateral arm training is a recommended method to enhance the motor areas excitability (neuroplasticity) in the chronic stroke patients.

Significance

Post stroke physical therapy can make use of bimanual training for better rehabilitation.

Source: S185 The effect of bilateral arm training on motor areas excitability in chronic stroke patients – Clinical Neurophysiology

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[ARTICLE] Neural Engineering for Rehabilitation – BioMed Research International – Full Text PDF

… In this special issue, we provide the eight research articles
showing recent advances in neural engineering for rehabilitation.
We hope that this special issue will further contribute
to promoting the development of neurorehabilitation and
fundamentally providing clinically feasible neurorehabilitative
methods. To this end, more clinical studies with real
patients are especially required to accurately evaluate the
clinical effect of new rehabilitative methods even though
experiments performed with healthy subjects generally show
similar clinical effects.
Han-Jeong Hwang
Do-Won Kim
Janne M. Hahne
Jongsang Son

 

Contents

Neural Engineering for Rehabilitation
Han-Jeong Hwang, Do-Won Kim, Janne M. Hahne, and Jongsang Son
Volume 2017, Article ID 9638098, 2 pages

EEG-Based Computer Aided Diagnosis of AutismSpectrum Disorder UsingWavelet, Entropy, and ANN
Ridha Djemal, Khalil AlSharabi, Sutrisno Ibrahim, and Abdullah Alsuwailem
Volume 2017, Article ID 9816591, 9 pages

Evaluation of a Compact Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface System
Jaeyoung Shin, Klaus-Robert Müller, Christoph H. Schmitz,
Do-Won Kim, and Han-Jeong Hwang
Volume 2017, Article ID 6820482, 11 pages

Patient-Centered Robot-Aided Passive Neurorehabilitation Exercise Based on Safety-Motion Decision-Making Mechanism
Lizheng Pan, Aiguo Song, Suolin Duan, and Zhuqing Yu
Volume 2017, Article ID 4185939, 11 pages

Vowel Imagery Decoding toward Silent Speech BCI Using Extreme Learning Machine with Electroencephalogram
Beomjun Min, Jongin Kim, Hyeong-jun Park, and Boreom Lee
Volume 2016, Article ID 2618265, 11 pages

Integrative Evaluation of Automated Massage Combined withThermotherapy: Physical, Physiological, and Psychological Viewpoints
Do-Won Kim, DaeWoon Lee, Joergen Schreiber, Chang-Hwan Im, and Hansung Kim
Volume 2016, Article ID 2826905, 8 pages

Effect of Anodal-tDCS on Event-Related Potentials: A Controlled Study
Ahmed Izzidien, Sriharasha Ramaraju, Mohammed Ali Roula, and PeterW. McCarthy
Volume 2016, Article ID 1584947, 8 pages

Analysis of the Influence of Complexity and Entropy of Odorant on Fractal Dynamics and Entropy of EEG Signal
Hamidreza Namazi, Amin Akrami, Sina Nazeri, and Vladimir V. Kulish
Volume 2016, Article ID 5469587, 5 pages

Data-Driven User Feedback: An Improved Neurofeedback Strategy considering the Interindividual Variability of EEG Features
Chang-Hee Han, Jeong-Hwan Lim, Jun-Hak Lee, Kangsan Kim, and Chang-Hwan Im
Volume 2016, Article ID 3939815, 7 pages

Download Full Texr PDF

, , ,

Leave a comment

[BLOG POST] Common Epilepsy Triggers – Epilepsy Talk

Epilepsy Talk

Epilepsy affects each person differently. Below is a guide to some common seizure triggers. You may not feel or notice anything in particular. Or you may have triggers which are not mentioned here. Keeping a seizure diary is the most effective way of keeping track of what triggers your seizures.

Reflex Epilepsy

Some people notice that their seizures occur in response to very specific stimuli or situations, as if the seizure is an automatic “reflex.”  In this type of seizure, it occurs consistently in relation to a specific trigger. For example, one type of reflex epilepsy is photosensitive epilepsy where seizures are triggered specifically by flashing lights. Other types of reflex epilepsies can be seizures triggered by the act of reading or by noises. These reflex epilepsies are not common. However, knowing the type of epilepsy and trigger is important information for a correct diagnosis. You can then work on eliminating these triggers whenever possible or find…

View original post 931 more words

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[BLOG POST] 40+ different types of seizures

Epilepsy Talk

When I was first diagnosed with epilepsy, there were two kinds of seizures. Grand Mal and Petit Mal. (Can you guess how old I am?)

Now, things are much more different and difficult. No more cut and dried.

So, please, if you have any additions, subtractions or corrections, feel free to chime in.

Because I don’t pretend to be an expert. In fact, this has certainly been a learning experience, from start to finish.

Here, to the best of my knowledge, are the 40+ different types of seizures.

1. Absence Seizure (“Petit Mal”)

Absence seizures account for 2-4 percent of epilepsy. They are characterized by brief episodes of staring, usually lasting only 2-10 seconds and may happen repeatedly during the day. There is no warning before a seizure and the person is completely alert afterwards, with no memory of it. Because they are so mild, you might not even realize…

View original post 5,321 more words

,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Traumatic Brain Injury Resource Guide – Brain Injury News

Brain Injury News – August 2017

Date Title
08/18/2017 Detection of text-based social cues in adults with traumatic brain injury
08/18/2017 Mild brain injury can cause bead-like swellings in brain cells
08/17/2017 Deep brain stimulation for the early treatment of the minimally conscious state and vegetative state #neuroskills
08/16/2017 Pain with traumatic brain injury and psychological disorders
08/15/2017 More helmets fewer deaths: Motorcycle helmet legislation impacts traumatic brain injury-related mortality in young adults
08/14/2017 Efficacy of methylphenidate for the treatment of mental sequelae after traumatic brain injury
08/11/2017 Age-related outcome of patients after traumatic brain injury
08/10/2017 Early predictors of outcome after mild traumatic brain injury
08/09/2017 Post-traumatic epilepsy associations with mental health outcomes in the first two years after TBI
08/08/2017 Feasibility of an intensive attention training program and its beneficial effect after childhood traumatic brain injury
08/07/2017 A case report of mania and psychosis five months after traumatic brain injury successfully treated using olanzapine
08/07/2017 Eye movements may be key in detecting brain injury, concussion
08/04/2017 Prediction of behavioural and cognitive deficits in patients with traumatic brain injury at an acute rehabilitation setting
08/03/2017 The effects of video game therapy on balance and attention in chronic ambulatory traumatic brain injury
08/01/2017 Negative impact of litigation procedures on patient outcomes four years after severe traumatic brain injury

Source: Traumatic Brain Injury Resource Guide – Brain Injury News

,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] The eWrist — A wearable wrist exoskeleton with sEMG-based force control for stroke rehabilitation.

Abstract:

Chronic wrist impairment is frequent following stroke and negatively impacts everyday life. Rehabilitation of the dysfunctional limb is possible but requires extensive training and motivation. Wearable training devices might offer new opportunities for rehabilitation. However, few devices are available to train wrist extension even though this movement is highly relevant for many upper limb activities of daily living. As a proof of concept, we developed the eWrist, a wearable one degree-of-freedom powered exoskeleton which supports wrist extension training. Conceptually one might think of an electric bike which provides mechanical support only when the rider moves the pedals, i.e. it enhances motor activity but does not replace it. Stroke patients may not have the ability to produce overt movements, but they might still be able to produce weak muscle activation that can be measured via surface electromyography (sEMG). By combining force and sEMG-based control in an assist-as-needed support strategy, we aim at providing a training device which enhances activity of the wrist extensor muscles in the context of daily life activities, thereby, driving cortical reorganization and recovery. Preliminary results show that the integration of sEMG signals in the control strategy allow for adjustable assistance with respect to a proxy measurement of corticomotor drive.

Source: The eWrist — A wearable wrist exoskeleton with sEMG-based force control for stroke rehabilitation – IEEE Xplore Document

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Towards an ankle neuroprosthesis for hybrid robotics: Concepts and current sources for functional electrical stimulation

Abstract:

Hybrid rehabilitation robotics combine neuro-prosthetic devices (close-loop functional electrical stimulation systems) and traditional robotic structures and actuators to explore better therapies and promote a more efficient motor function recovery or compensation. Although hybrid robotics and ankle neuroprostheses (NPs) have been widely developed over the last years, there are just few studies on the use of NPs to electrically control both ankle flexion and extension to promote ankle recovery and improved gait patterns in paretic limbs. The aim of this work is to develop an ankle NP specifically designed to work in the field of hybrid robotics. This article presents early steps towards this goal and makes a brief review about motor NPs and Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) principles and most common devices used to aid the ankle functioning during the gait cycle. It also shows a current sources analysis done in this framework, in order to choose the best one for this intended application.

Source: Towards an ankle neuroprosthesis for hybrid robotics: Concepts and current sources for functional electrical stimulation – IEEE Xplore Document

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] A novel approach to integrate VR exer-games for stroke rehabilitation: Evaluating the implementation of a ‘games room’

Abstract:

This study evaluates the integration of virtual reality (VR) exer-games for people post-stroke through the implementation of a “exer-games room” in an inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Qualitative data (interviews with patients and clinicians) and quantitative data (from the first year of operation of the games room) are synthesized and reviewed to provide an overall interpretative evaluation. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) is used to analyze the successful and less successful factors involved in the implementation.

Source: A novel approach to integrate VR exer-games for stroke rehabilitation: Evaluating the implementation of a ‘games room’ – IEEE Xplore Document

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: