Posts Tagged hemiparesis

[ARTICLE] Assessment of the Efficacy of ReoGo-J Robotic Training Against Other Rehabilitation Therapies for Upper-Limb Hemiplegia After Stroke: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial – Full Text

Background: Stroke patients experience chronic hemiparesis in their upper extremities leaving negative effects on quality of life. Robotic therapy is one method to recover arm function, but its research is still in its infancy. Research questions of this study is to investigate how to maximize the benefit of robotic therapy using ReoGo-J for arm hemiplegia in chronic stroke patients.

Methods: Design of this study is a multi-center parallel group trial following the prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded endpoint (PROBE) study model. Participants and setting will be 120 chronic stroke patients (over 6 months post-stroke) will be randomly allocated to three different rehabilitation protocols. In this study, the control group will receive 20 min of standard rehabilitation (conventional occupational therapy) and 40 min of self-training (i.e., sanding, placing and stretching). The robotic therapy group will receive 20 min of standard rehabilitation and 40 min of robotic therapy using ReoGo®-J device. The combined therapy group will receive 40 min of robotic therapy and 20 min of constraint-induced movement therapy (protocol to improve upper-limb use in ADL suggests). This study employs the Fugl-Meyer Assessment upper-limb score (primary outcome), other arm function measures and the Stroke Impact Scale score will be measured at baseline, 5 and 10 weeks of the treatment phase. In analysis of this study, we use the mixed effects model for repeated measures to compare changes in outcomes between groups at 5 and 10 Weeks. The registration number of this study is UMIN000022509.

Conclusions: This study is a feasible, multi-site randomized controlled trial to examine our hypothesis that combined training protocol could maximize the benefit of robotic therapy and best effective therapeutic strategy for patients with upper-limb hemiparesis.

Introduction

Severe, persistent paresis occurs in over 40% of stroke patients (1) and is reported to significantly decrease their quality of life (2). Thus, much research has been conducted to develop interventions, with many specifically targeting upper extremity hemiplegia. Among the many examples of neuroscience-based rehabilitation (neuro-rehabilitation) strategies, there is strong evidence supporting robotic therapy, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), and task-oriented training (34).

Robotic therapy is considered an effective intervention for mild to severe hemiplegic arm (56), and is cost-effective for chronic stroke patients in terms of both manpower and medical costs (78). However, its effects may be limited for some patients. Some researchers have found that robotic therapy effectively improves arm function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) (9) and Action research arm test (ARAT) (10), but does not improve the use of the affected arm in activities of daily living (ADL) as measured by the Motor activity log (MAL)-14 (11) and by analysis of data from an accelerometer attached to the affected arm (61214).

On the contrary, CIMT is the most well-established intervention for improving the use of the affected arm in ADL (15). CIMT consists of three components: (1) a repeated task-oriented approach, (2) a behavioral approach to transfer the function gained during training to actual life (also called the “transfer package”), and (3) constraining use of the affected arm. Some researchers consider the transfer package the most important component of CIMT. In fact, research has shown that usage of the affected arm in daily life is significantly different between patients treated with and without the transfer package component (1617). However, many therapists question whether CIMT could benefit their patients because of the shortage of sites possessing the clinical resources to provide the intervention for the long duration required for effectiveness (18).

Therefore, there is an urgent need to establish an effective therapeutic approach, especially for upper-limb hemiplegia during the chronic stage of stroke recovery for which there are few clinical resources (In Japan, the insurance system only allows 260 min per month). Therefore, we will compare the efficacy of several therapy methods. As a control, we will monitor changes in arm function in patients undergoing a short, standard rehabilitation by a therapist and standard self-training (control group). This will be compared to similar self-training including robotic therapy with the ReoGo-J device as an adjuvant therapy (RT group). Finally, the robotic therapy will be compared to combined therapy including robotic therapy and CIMT (CT group). Through these comparisons, we will investigate the effect of robotic therapy, both alone and in combination with CIMT, which we hypothesize will complement each other in chronic stroke rehabilitation. Here, we report the structure and protocol of a multi-center, randomized controlled trial.[…]

 

Continue —> Frontiers | Assessment of the Efficacy of ReoGo-J Robotic Training Against Other Rehabilitation Therapies for Upper-Limb Hemiplegia After Stroke: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial | Neurology

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[Abstract] Adding electrical stimulation during standard rehabilitation after stroke to improve motor function. A systematic review and meta-analysis

Abstract

Background

Clinical studies have shown that sensory input improves motor function when added to active training after neurological injuries in the spinal cord.

Objective

We aimed to determine the effect on motor function of extremities of adding an electrical sensory modality without motor recruitment before or with routine rehabilitation for hemiparesis after stroke by a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods

We searched databases including MEDLINE via PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1978 to the end of November 2017 for reports of randomized controlled trials or controlled studies of patients with a clinical diagnosis of stroke who underwent 1) transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or peripheral electromyography-triggered sensory stimulation over a peripheral nerve and associated muscles or 2) acupuncture to areas that produced sensory effects, without motor recruitment, along with routine rehabilitation. Outcome measures were motor impairment, activity, and participation outcomes defined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

Results

The search yielded 11 studies with data that could be included in a meta-analysis. Electrical sensory inputs, when paired with routine therapy, improved peak torque dorsiflexion (mean difference [MD] 2.44 Nm, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.26–4.63). On subgroup analysis, the combined therapy yielded a significant difference in terms of sensory stimulation without motor recruitment only on the Timed Up and Go test in the chronic phase of stroke (MD 3.51 sec, 95% CI 3.05–3.98). The spasticity score was reduced but not significantly (MD − 0.83 points, 95% CI -1.77 − 0.10).

Conclusion

Electrical sensory input can contribute to routine rehabilitation to improve early post-stroke lower-extremity impairment and late motor function, with no change in spasticity. Prolonged periods of sensory stimulation such as TENS combined with activity can have beneficial effects on impairment and function after stroke.

via Adding electrical stimulation during standard rehabilitation after stroke to improve motor function. A systematic review and meta-analysis – ScienceDirect

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[ARTICLE] Botulinum Toxin Type A Treatment Combined with Intensive Rehabilitation for Gait Poststroke: A Preliminary Study – Full Text

Goal

To examine the effects of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) treatment combined with intensive rehabilitation for gait compared with intensive rehabilitation alone in patients with chronic stroke.

Materials and Methods

A comparative case series design was used. Subjects were 19 patients with chronic stroke and spastic hemiplegia. In 9 patients (group I), BoNT-A was injected into spastic muscles of the affected lower limbs, followed by a 4-week inpatient intensive rehabilitation program. In the other 10 patients (group II), a 4-week inpatient intensive rehabilitation program alone was first provided (control period) followed by the same treatment protocol in group I. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) scores, range of motion (ROM), gait speed in the 10-Meter Walking Test, 6-Minute Walking Distance Test (6MD) scores, Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) scores, and Berg Balance Scale scores were evaluated every 4 weeks following baseline assessments.

Results

All results except for the MAS score of knee flexor and the ROM of knee flexion improved in group I and the gait speed, 6MD, and TUG scores improved in group II. Intergroup comparisons at week 4 showed significantly greater improvements in the MAS score of ankle plantar flexor, ROM of ankle dorsiflexion, and 6MD in group I than in group II (P = .016, .011, and .009, respectively).

Conclusions

BoNT-A treatment for lower-limb spasticity, combined with intensive rehabilitation, was effective in improving spasticity and the 6MD compared with intensive rehabilitation alone in patients with chronic stroke.

 

Introduction

Lower-limb spasticity is a major problem in the management of patients after stroke12 because it causes gait disturbance.3 Such patients often have difficulty performing ankle dorsiflexion effectively during the swing phase of the gait cycle because of muscle spasticity and the inability to activate the ankle dorsiflexors.4 Calf muscle spasticity typically causes foot deformity, which results in the loss of heel strike, reduced toe clearance, and an inadequate base of support.5 These impairments decrease gait ability: cadence, stride length, speed, capacity, and stability.678910 Thus, lower-limb spasticity causes gait disturbance, which limits activities of daily living and, eventually, quality of life. Effective treatment of lower-limb spasticity is important in improving gait ability and enhancing the independence of patients after a stroke.

One of the primary treatments for lower-limb spasticity is botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A). Although BoNT-A has been shown to reduce lower-limb spasticity in patients after stroke,111213its effects on improving gait ability have not been consistent among different previous studies. Pittock et al,14 Kaji et al,15 and Burbaud et al1 reported that BoNT-A injection reduced lower-limb spasticity but did not significantly improve gait pattern or speed. By contrast, Hesse et al11 and Mancini et al16 reported that BoNT-A treatment was effective in improving gait speed as well as lower-limb spasticity. Similarly, a systematic review and meta-analysis recently showed that BoNT-A treatment for lower-limb spasticity was associated with a small but statistically significant increase in gait speed.17 Consequently, the effect of BoNT-A alone for improving gait ability has been considered minimal.

To improve gait ability, adjunctive rehabilitation has recently been recommended to optimize the effects of BoNT-A treatment for lower-limb spasticity in poststroke patients.181920212223Gastaldi et al21 reported that BoNT-A treatment for lower-limb spasticity combined with additional stretching and physical therapy improved gait speed and single- and double-limb support during the stance phase of the gait cycle. Similarly, Roche et al22 reported that BoNT-A treatment for lower-limb spasticity combined with self-rehabilitation improved gait speed, capacity, and time to ascend and descend a flight of stairs. By contrast, Demetrios et al23 suggested no significant improvement in gait speed for 2 groups receiving BoNT-A treatment for lower-limb spasticity combined with high- or low-intensity rehabilitation. However, they concluded that both groups received BoNT-A treatment combined with regular rehabilitation, so there may have been insufficient variation of intensity during the rehabilitation phase. Therefore, the capacity of BoNT-A treatment combined with more intensive rehabilitation to improve gait ability remains unclear in poststroke patients.

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of BoNT-A treatment for lower-limb spasticity combined with intensive rehabilitation on improving gait ability in patients with chronic stroke and spastic hemiplegia compared with intensive rehabilitation alone. This study hypothesized that BoNT-A treatment combined with intensive rehabilitation would improve lower-limb spasticity and gait ability more effectively than intensive rehabilitation alone.[…]

 

Continue —> Botulinum Toxin Type A Treatment Combined with Intensive Rehabilitation for Gait Poststroke: A Preliminary Study – ScienceDirect

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[Abstract] Clinical and kinematic evaluation of the H-Man arm robot for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation: Preliminary findings of a randomised controlled trial

Introduction/Background

The H-Man robot, a table-top, portable, 2D planar, end-effector with virtual reality feedback was designed to deliver self-paced, repetitive reaching arm movements. Preliminary results of a randomized clinical trial of 26/44 strokes with hemiparetic arm weakness are presented.

Material and method

Inclusion criteria included first-stroke, > 4 months duration with Fugl Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) 20–50/66) without contraindications to robot-aided therapy. Following informed consent, subjects were randomized into 2 groups: H-Man-conventional (HCT) group received 18 sessions over 6 weeks of 60 minutes of H-man training then 30 minutes of conventional therapy (CT), while control group (CG) received a similar intensity of 90 minutes of CT. Blinded outcome assessments at weeks 0 (baseline), 3, 6 (end-training), 12 and 24 (follow-up). The primary outcome measure was FMA change at week 6. Parametric analysis was used and level of significance was P < 0.05.

Results

Altogether, data from 26 out of 44 subjects were analyzed. (13 HCT, 13 CG). Mean age was 54.0 years (SD 10.9), 14/26 were male, 15/26 had hemorrhagic strokes, mean stroke duration 227.2 days (SD 207.2), and mean baseline FMA 38.6 (SD 11.1). The HCT group achieved significantly better FMA gains compared to CG (4.15 HCT vs. 1.69 CG, P = 0.03) at week 6 (post-training), and at week 24 (5.77 HCT vs 2.61 CG, P = 0.03). There were no adverse side effects or drop outs. Robotic kinematic measures of line and circle temporal tracing correlated with FMA scores at Week 0.

Conclusion

Combinatory arm rehabilitation with H-Man robot was superior to CT and well tolerated.

 

via Clinical and kinematic evaluation of the H-Man arm robot for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation: Preliminary findings of a randomised controlled trial – ScienceDirect

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[Abstract] Sporadic distant neurotoxin effects in the chronic treatment of spasticity

Introduction/Background

Neurotoxin therapy is an effective component of comprehensive spasticity management. The two cases presented demonstrate adverse effects.

Material and method

Patient S is a 60-year-old female with right spastic hemiparesis due to left hemispheric stroke (age 46) treated with therapy, bracing, oral baclofen. Patient R is a 28-year-old female with left spastic hemiparesis due to hemispherectomy (age 6).

Results

For patient S, onabotulinumtoxinA (ONA) was initiated at 300 units (u) to the right upper extremity (RUE), advanced to 500u. She received injections every 3–3.5 months for over 9 years and continued to function independently. At routine follow-up, she related left upper extremity (LUE) weakness that she noted but did not report with her two prior injections. She denied any other symptoms. Examination revealed mild, diffuse LUE weakness, imaging was unremarkable and EMG demonstrated a chronic LUE axonal polyradiculopathy. ONA was continued at 300u to the RUE with somewhat lesser but maintained benefit without adverse effects.

For patient R, ONA was initiated at 400u to the LUE every three months for 13 rounds, advanced to 500u. Contralateral (RUE) weakness developed after the second round of 500u dosing. Diagnostic evaluation was notable only for increased insertional activity, fibrillationpotentials and decreased recruitment with subsequent long duration polyphasic motor unitpotentials. Unchanged with high dose steroids, weakness improved with IVIG. Repeat ONA with 500u resulted in good local effect, recurrent contralateral upper and lower extremity weakness. EMG demonstrated contralateral cervical, thoracic and lumbosacral axonal polyradiculopathy. Symptoms improved with IVIG. Patient declined subsequent ONA.

Conclusion

Both patients were treated with neurotoxin therapy for 3–9 years with good clinical response before developing the adverse reaction. Weakness distant to the injection sites is supported by electrodiagnostic findings of contralateral axonal polyradiculopathy. The clinical presentations suggest the possibility that the adverse effect of distant weakness may be immune-mediated and dose-related.

 

via Sporadic distant neurotoxin effects in the chronic treatment of spasticity – ScienceDirect

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[Abstract] How effective is physical therapy for gait muscle activity in hemiparetic patients who receive botulinum toxin injections?

BACKGROUND: Administration of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) to the ankle plantar flexors in patients with hemiplegia reduces the strength of knee extension, which may decrease their walking ability. Studies have reported improvements in walking ability with physical therapy following BoNT-A administration. However, no previous studies have evaluated from an exercise physiology perspective the efficacy of physical therapy after BoNT-A administration for adult patients with hemiplegia.

AIM: To investigate the effects of physical therapy following BoNT-A administration on gait electromyography for patients with hemiparesis secondary to stroke.

DESIGN: Non-randomized controlled trial.

SETTING: Single center.

POPULATION: Thirty-five patients with chronic stroke with spasticity were assigned to BoNT-A monotherapy (n=18) or BoNT-A plus physical therapy (PT) (n=17).
METHODS: On the paralyzed side of the body, 300 single doses of BoNT-A were administered intramuscularly to the ankle plantar flexors. Physical therapy was performed for 2 weeks, starting from the day after administration. Gait electromyography was performed and gait parameters were measured immediately before and 2 weeks after BoNT- A administration. Relative muscle activity, co-activation indices, and walking time/distance were calculated for each phase.

RESULTS: For patients who received BoNT-A monotherapy, soleus activity during the loading response decreased 2 weeks after the intervention (p<0.01). For those who received BoNT-A+PT, biceps femoris activity and knee co-activation index during the loading response and tibialis anterior activity during the pre-swing phases increased, whereas soleus and rectus femoris activities during the swing phase decreased 2 weeks after the intervention (p<0.05). These rates of change were significantly greater than those for patients who received BoNT-A monotherapy (p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Following BoNT-A monotherapy, soleus activity during the stance phase decreased and walking ability either remained unchanged or deteriorated. Following BoNT-A+PT, muscle activity and knee joint stability increased during the stance phase, and abnormal muscle activity during the swing phase was suppressed.

CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: If botulinum treatment of the ankle plantar flexors in stroke patients is targeted to those with low knee extension strength, or if it aims to improve leg swing on the paralyzed side of the body, then physical therapy following BoNT-A administration could be an essential part of the treatment strategy.

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via How effective is physical therapy for gait muscle activity in hemiparetic patients who receive botulinum toxin injections? – European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2018 Jun 11 – Minerva Medica – Journals

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[Abstract] Bilateral Motor Cortex Plasticity in Individuals With Chronic Stroke, Induced by Paired Associative Stimulation

Background: In the chronic phase after stroke, cortical excitability differs between the cerebral hemispheres; the magnitude of this asymmetry depends on degree of motor impairment. It is unclear whether these asymmetries also affect capacity for plasticity in corticospinal tract excitability or whether hemispheric differences in plasticity are related to chronic sensorimotor impairment.

Methods: Response to paired associative stimulation (PAS) was assessed bilaterally in 22 individuals with chronic hemiparesis. Corticospinal excitability was measured as the area under the motor-evoked potential (MEP) recruitment curve (AUC) at baseline, 5 minutes, and 30 minutes post-PAS. Percentage change in contralesional AUC was calculated and correlated with paretic motor and somatosensory impairment scores.

Results: PAS induced a significant increase in AUC in the contralesional hemisphere (P = .041); in the ipsilesional hemisphere, there was no significant effect of PAS (P = .073). Contralesional AUC showed significantly greater change in individuals without an ipsilesional MEP (P = .029). Percentage change in contralesional AUC between baseline and 5 m post-PAS correlated significantly with FM score (r = −0.443; P = .039) and monofilament thresholds (r = 0.444, P = .044).

Discussion: There are differential responses to PAS within each cerebral hemisphere. Contralesional plasticity was increased in individuals with more severe hemiparesis, indicated by both the absence of an ipsilesional MEP and a greater degree of motor and somatosensory impairment. These data support a body of research showing compensatory changes in the contralesional hemisphere after stroke; new therapies for individuals with chronic stroke could exploit contralesional plasticity to help restore function.

 

via Bilateral Motor Cortex Plasticity in Individuals With Chronic Stroke, Induced by Paired Associative Stimulation – Jennifer K. Ferris, Jason L. Neva, Beatrice A. Francisco, Lara A. Boyd, 2018

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[ARTICLE] Upper Limb Motor Impairment Post Stroke – Full Text

Synopsis

Understanding upper limb impairment after stroke is essential to planning therapeutic efforts to restore function. However determining which upper limb impairment to treat and how is complex for two reasons: 1) the impairments are not static, i.e. as motor recovery proceeds, the type and nature of the impairments may change; therefore the treatment needs to evolve to target the impairment contributing to dysfunction at a given point in time. 2) multiple impairments may be present simultaneously, i.e., a patient may present with weakness of the arm and hand immediately after a stroke, which may not have resolved when spasticity sets in a few weeks or months later; hence there may be a layering of impairments over time making it difficult to decide what to treat first. The most useful way to understand how impairments contribute to upper limb dysfunction may be to examine them from the perspective of their functional consequences. There are three main functional consequences of impairments on upper limb function are: (1) learned nonuse, (2) learned bad-use, and (3) forgetting as determined by behavioral analysis of tasks. The impairments that contribute to each of these functional limitations are described.

The nature of upper limb motor impairment

According to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health model (ICF) (Geyh, Cieza et al. 2004), impairments may be described as (1) impairments of body function such as a significant deviation or loss in neuromusculoskeletal and movement related function related to joint mobility, muscle power, muscle tone and/or involuntary movements, or (2) impairment of body structures such as a significant deviation in structure of the nervous system or structures related to movement, for example the arm and/or hand. A stroke may lead to both types of impairments. Upper limb impairments after stroke are the cause of functional limitations with regard to use of the affected upper limb after stroke, so a clear understanding of the underlying impairments is necessary to provide appropriate treatment. However understanding upper limb impairments in any given patient is complex for two reasons: 1) the impairments are not static, i.e. as motor recovery proceeds, the type and nature of the impairments may change; therefore the treatment needs to evolve to target the impairment contributing to dysfunction at a given point in time. 2) multiple impairments may be present simultaneously, i.e., a patient may present with weakness of the arm and hand immediately after a stroke, which may not have resolved when spasticity sets in a few weeks or months later; hence there may be a layering of impairments over time making it difficult to decide what to treat first. It is useful to review the progression of motor recovery as described by Twitchell (Twitchell 1951) and Brunnstrom (Brunnstom 1956) to understand how impairments may be layered over time (Figure 1).

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Sequential progression of motor recovery as described by Twitchell and Brunstrumm. Note that while recovery is proceeding from one stage to the next, residual impairment from preceding stages may still be present leading to the layering of impairment. Also note the underlying physiological processes that may account for progression from one stage to the next.

Understanding motor impairment from a functional perspective

The most useful way to understand how impairments contribute to upper limb dysfunction may be to examine them from the perspective of their functional consequences. There are three main functional consequences of stroke on the upper limb: (1) learned nonuse, (2) learned bad-use, and (3) forgetting as determined by behavioral analysis of a task such as reaching for a food pellet and bringing it to the mouth in animal models of stroke (Whishaw, Alaverdashvili et al. 2008). These are equally valid for human behavior. Each of the functional consequences and the underlying impairments are elaborated below.[…]

 

Continue —>  Upper Limb Motor Impairment Post Stroke

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[Abstract] The effect of robot therapy assisted by surface EMG on hand recovery in post-stroke patients. A pilot study

Abstract

Background: Hemiparesis caused by a stroke negatively limits a patient’s motor function. Nowadays, innovative technologies such as robots are commonly used in upper limb rehabilitation. The main goal of robot-aided therapy is to provide a maximum number of stimuli in order to stimulate brain neuroplasticity. Treatment applied in this study via the AMADEO robot aimed to improve finger flexion and extension.
Aim: To assess the effect of rehabilitation assisted by a robot and enhanced by surface EMG.
Research project: Before-after study design.
Materials and methods: The study group consisted of 10 post-stroke patients enrolled for therapy with the AMADEO robot for at least 15 sessions. At the beginning and at the end of treatment, the following tests were used for clinical assessment: Fugl-Meyer scale, Box and Block test and Nine Hole Peg test. In the present study, we used surface electromyography (sEMG) to maintain optimal kinematics of hand motion. Whereas sensorial feedback, provided by the robot, was vital in obtaining closed-loop control. Thus, muscle contraction was transmitted to the amplifier through sEMG, activating the mechanism of the robot. Consequentially, sensorial feedback was provided to the patient.
Results: Statistically significant improvement of upper limb function was observed in: Fugl-Meyer (p = 0.38) and Box and Block (p = 0.27). The Nine Hole Peg Test did not show statistically significant changes in motor skills of the hand. However, the functional improvement was observed at the level of 6% in the Fugl-Meyer, 15% in the Box and Block, and 2% in the Nine Hole Peg test.
Conclusions: Results showed improvement in hand grasp and overall function of the upper limb. Due to sEMG, it was possible to implement robot therapy in the treatment of patients with severe hand impairment.

via The effect of robot therapy assisted by surface EMG on hand recovery in pos

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[Abstract] Evolution of upper limb kinematics four years after subacute robot-assisted rehabilitation in stroke patients

Purpose: To assess functional status and robot-based kinematic measures four years after subacute robot-assisted rehabilitation in hemiparesis.

Material and methods: Twenty-two patients with stroke-induced hemiparesis participated in a ≥3-month upper limb combined program of robot-assisted and occupational therapy from two months post-stroke, and received community-based therapy after discharge. Four years later, nineteen (86%) participated in this long-term follow-up study. Assessments two, five and 54 months post-stroke included Fugl-Meyer (FM), Modified Frenchay Scale (MFS, at Month 54) and robot-based kinematic measures of targeting tasks in three directions, north, paretic and non-paretic: distance covered, velocity, accuracy (RMS error from straight line) and smoothness (number of velocity peaks; upward changes in accuracy and smoothness measures represent worsening). Analysis was stratified by FM score at two months: ≥17 (Group 1) or < 17 (Group 2). Correlation between impairment (FM) and function (MFS) was explored at 54 months.

Results: Fugl-Meyer scores were stable from five to 54 months (+1[-2;4], median[1st;3rd quartiles], ns). Kinematic changes in the three directions pooled were: distance covered, -1[-17;2]% (ns); velocity, -8[-32;28]% (ns); accuracy, +6[-13;98]% (ns); smoothness, +44[-6;126]% (p<0.05). Group 2 showed decline vs Group 1 (p<0.001) in FM (Group 1, +3[1;5], p<0.01; Group 2, -7[-11;-1], ns) and accuracy (Group 1, -3[-27;38]%, ns; Group 2, +29[17;140]%, p<0.001). At 54 months, FM and MFS were highly correlated (Pearson’s rho = 0.89; p<0.001).

Conclusions: While impairment appeared stable four years after robot-assisted upper limb training during subacute post-stroke phase, kinematic performance deteriorated in spite of community-based therapy, especially in patients with more severe impairment.

 

via Evolution of upper limb kinematics four years after subacute robot-assisted rehabilitation in stroke patients: International Journal of Neuroscience: Vol 0, No ja

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