Posts Tagged Apps

[WEB SITE] Top 18 Apps for People with Brain Injuries

Note: This content was updated in February 2017. Some of the apps from the original post are still listed; however, we’ve found many more that can be extremely helpful…

We know what you’re thinking: don’t people with a traumatic brain injury have enough to relearn without training in new smart phone technology? Our answer: Yes and no. Yes, absolutely, which is why the apps we recommend are meant to complement existing therapies and programming. No, because the more frequently the mind is exercised, the greater the possibility of neuroplasticity rewiring the brain to be more functional in the future.

Technology today is working harder than ever to improve our lives. There are literally hundreds of apps for people with brain injuries and similar problems. We have selected these apps because they build on the day-to-day needs of an individual living with a TBI. We focused our research on these areas:
.         Social/Emotional
.         Functional
.         Cognitive
Specifically, these apps help clients work on the following: short-term memory loss, communication/socialization problems, anxiety, behavioral and organization issues.

Alarmed
Free with $1.99 Upgrade Available (iOS)
(Android Counterpart: Lists Alarmed!)
Alarmed augments short-term memory while the user is rebuilding his or her own. A productivity app for the masses, people with traumatic brain injuries can use Alarmed to create multiple reminders with unique, memorable tones for each task. Reminders can be customized with a “To Do” list and send multiple email reminders/updates. This app also comes with a timer to assist in programming.

Cozi Family Organizer
Free (iOS & Android)
Families can stay in sync on multiple platforms using this app that combines a shared calendar, shopping and “To Do” lists. With everyone on the same page, organizational skills are enhanced and frustration diminished.

EverNote 
Free (iOS & Android)
EverNote helps improve memory, organizational skills and even creativity by syncing ideas on multiple devices. The user can take notes, capture photos, create “To Do” lists and record voice reminders. The searchability function can be a tremendous boon for those with short-term memory loss.

Productive Habits and Daily Goals Tracker
Free with In-App Purchases (iOS)
(Android Counterpart: Habitizer) 
This app helps users develop positive habits in their lives by keeping them organized, tracking their progress and maintaining motivation. It allows users to set the habits they want to develop and receive reminders when tasks are to be completed. Users can color code these based on the priority or category of the habit. This app can also allow a therapist or caregiver to set priority levels for each task.

BrainHQ
Free with In-App Purchases (iOS)
(Android Counterpart: Luminosity)
Brain HQ tailors a training program for each persons’ unique mind. Therapeutic exercises are personalized based on performance and can help improve cognitive skills. Exercises are designed to improve attention, memory, people skills and navigation.

Brainscape – Smart Flashcards
Free to $9.99 with In-App Purchases (iOS & Android)
Pick a subject from geography to vocabulary-building and Brainscape has a set of smart digital flashcards. What makes these flashcards so smart? Besides being color-coded to aid recall, users are asked to indicate prior knowledge of the answers. Questions the user did not understand or answer correctly are repeated more frequently than those answered correctly.

Constant Therapy
Free for 30 Days (iOS & Android)
Constant Therapy is a speech therapy app for individuals who are looking to increase their cognitive abilities. This app is scientifically proven to improve speech, memory, cognition and comprehension skills. While this app can’t take the place of therapy, it is a great way to augment existing treatment by completing progressively challenging tasks right from your very own phone.

Spaced Retrieval TherAppy 
$3.99 (iOS)
(Android Counterpart: Spaced Retrieval)
Spaced Retrieval is a scientifically-proven way of improving recall of names, facts, the routines of several people and more. People with brain injuries can rehearse memory skills by recalling an answer over expanding intervals of time (1, 2, 4 or 8 minutes) that helps to cement the information in their memories. Please note: this app is not intended for use without therapy.

Answers: YesNo
$1.99 (iOS & Android)
For non-verbal clients, this app utilizes two large, color-coded buttons, green for “Yes” and red for “No”. When either button is pressed, the app vocalizes the client’s decision. This is a wonderful tool to help those with a brain injury or speech problem communicate without a struggle.

Audible
Free (iOS &Android)
Audible is for individuals who love a good book but are having difficulty reading, retaining information or who simply enjoy closing their eyes and having a good book read to them. With Audible, users do not have to give up their literary passions, they just have to listen.  This app is also compatible with Amazon, so books can be downloaded right from your account.

Clear Record Premium 
Price ranges from $.99 to $1.99 (iOS) depending on upgrades
(Android Counterpart: AndRecord)
This audio recording app allows the user to record conversations in practically any environment and play it back at the speed and volume of their choosing. Unlike many other voice-recording apps, Clear Record Premium filters out ambient sound to ensure pitch and clear voices.

Dragon Dictation
Free (iOS & Android)
Speak and this app will recognize the users voice and transcribe what they say into text messages, emails and even update social media. Dragon Dictation is a perfect mass media communication tool for anyone with a physical limitation.

Type ‘n Talk
Free (iOS)
(Android Counterpart: Type and Speak)
This app is incredibly useful for non-verbal individuals and other individuals who have difficulty with speech due to physical limitations. Type ‘n Talk allows the user to type what they need to say and their verbalized audio will play through whatever device is being used. This app also allows the user to copy text from websites and messages and provides a variety of languages.

Pocket Verbal Ability 
Free (iOS & Android) 
Users can increase their vocabulary with this user-friendly vocabulary app. Pocket Verbal Ability asks questions that will help prepare for job interviews, exams, and day-to-day life.

Social Skills 
$3.99 (iOS) 
(Android Counterpart: Talkingtiles)
This app includes the most common topics in the functional social skills system for people with brain injuries to model for appropriateness. Topics include the following: meeting/greeting people, taking responsibility, being polite, joining others in groups, apologizing/excusing self, following directions and handling criticism. Users watch a brief video of a person performing the correct behavior for the social situation and can then pattern their own behavior accordingly.

Breathe2Relax
Free (iOS & Android)
For anyone who could use a time out to relax, Breathe2Relax has been proven to help mood stabilization and control anger and anxiety. Users should simply indicate their level of stress and follow the audio instructions to breathe their way back to serenity. Essentially, this app provides on-site audio diaphragmatic breathing exercises.

WeFeel
Free (iOS & Android)
WeFeel is a mental health app that users can use to track their emotions and monitor how they change over time. This app can help manage emotions by allowing the user to visualize their anger, fear, stress, etc and then offer coping strategies. With a subscription, a counselor, therapist or caregiver will be able to monitor the users recorded emotions in real time from their own smart phone.

In Case of Emergency
$1.99 (iOS & Android)
This app allows people to store their medical information in a single location that is convenient for medical personnel in the event of any urgent situation. This app can also use to locate the nearest hospital.

All apps labeled iOS can be found at the Amazon.com: Apps & Games. Apps for Android can be found at either Google Play or the Amazon App Store for Android.

Since this is by no means an exhaustive list, we are always working to improve and add to it. We would love to hear from individuals with a traumatic brain injury and their physicians and caregivers about which apps they use.

Source: Top 18 Apps for People with Brain Injuries – LifeSkillsVillage.com

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[Editorial] E-Rehabilitation: New Reality or Virtual Need?

 

This is an era of digitalization, internet, wifi, use of mobile and smart phones, virtual world, applications and technology. On one hand these are contributing to cyber psychopathology, on the other hand these have a potential for management.

With the understanding of disability as a complex interaction between the effects of illness and contextual factors, both personal and environmental, the relevance of new avenues to deliver rehabilitative services is profound. A significant proportion of the population is underserved, with the National Mental Health Survey of India 2016- a survey which covered 34,802 individuals from 12 states of India- showing a mental morbidity of 10.6% in those over the age of 18 years, and 7.3% in those between the ages of 13 and 17, but with a treatment gap of 28–83% (and 86% for alcohol use disorders). In addition, “three out of four persons with a severe mental disorder experienced significant disability in work, social and family life” [1]. Given the extent of the need and the dearth of services, the report recommends the following, “Technology based applications for near-to-home-based care using smart-phone by health workers, evidence-based (electronic) clinical decision support systems for adopting minimum levels of care by doctors, creating systems for longitudinal follow-up of affected persons to ensure continued care through electronic databases and registers can greatly help in this direction. To facilitate this, convergence with other flagship schemes such as Digital India needs to be explored” [1]. Recent data has shown that smartphone user base in India has crossed 300 million users in 2016, making it the second largest smartphone market in the world [2]. The potential for service delivery via internet enabled devices seems likely only to rise over time, but what are the possibilities before us now, and equally important, what are the challenges to such approaches?

An exploration of the role of modern technology in rehabilitation in January, 2016, has highlighted the various possibilities in terms of social networking and peer support, telepsychiatry, E health services as well as smartphones and apps [3]. It’s interesting that estimates at the time alluded to smartphone users crossing the 200 million mark in 2016, a 100 million users less than later estimates! Looking ahead these are the ways new and emerging technologies could change the ways we approach and conceptualise recovery,

  1. (a)

    Information access: Access to information and more specifically, access to relevant and accurate information have to potential to allow caregivers and patients to recognise mental health issues early, and seek help. Some of this information will be from traditional media, such as radio and television, but a significant proportion of people are likely to glean this information from social media sites and communication apps—such as the almost ubiquitous Whatsapp—on which they also consume other services and obtain their daily news and information from. Search algorithms and the way they rank different sources of information are likely to play an important role in the way people form their opinions about the illnesses they suffer from and the way they seek help. There is a need for curated information on mental health, especially in the Indian context and in vernacular languages, that people can not only refer to themselves, but which they can direct their friends and family toward as reliable sources of information too. Health care professionals must be prepared to help their patients learn ‘eHealth literacy’ [4].

  2. (b)

    Automation: Work is something that most people with mental illness aspire to do, and this can enhance their quality of life significantly [5]. Automation and applications of artificial intelligence are poised to change the face of industry as well as our lifestyles. Some traditional jobs such as fabrication and driving are poised to radically change. This will mean that vocational rehabilitation programmes will have to keep pace with a changing environment, and look to integrating industry expertise in the designing of courses and course materials which remain relevant to patients. Government programmes such as the Skill India initiative have the potential to help evolve this flexibility in course design, and to skill or re-skill persons in their quest to obtain and sustain jobs.

    Workplace is being replaced by home based workstations, computers, laptops and notebooks. People accustomed to these run their office from anywhere and everywhere. There will be a need to redefine ‘work place’ as ‘where ever the laptop is’. Thus, in future, persons undergoing rehabilitation, can ‘work from home’, provided they have the facilities, and job to do. Staying and working from home for persons with mental health problems, will prevent them from ‘live’ socialising, using social skills, and giving respite to family caregivers. On the other hand, they would be under direct supervision of the family, reducing their concerns and anxieties.

  3. (c)

    Digital identities and digital payments: With the increasing digitisation of access to services, there is a growing need for education in digital literacy and security. Programmes which teach life skills will have to help their users familiarise themselves with the advantages of new technologies as well as the risks they bring. A number of records related to disability are likely to form parts of central databases, such as the Unique Disability ID [6], and the potential to offer a number of services through a single user interface to those with disability is significant. It would also ease the accessing of such benefits even when patients travel or move to other states, whether temporarily or permanently. The storage of health records in electronic formats, e-health records, would allow patients to exert control over access to their own records and enable transfers from one healthcare provider to another without delay or loss of information. An e-health record format which is shared among different providers and which allows different hospital information systems to effectively share information is an important need. There can be a possibility to maintain a central registry of persons receiving mental health rehabilitation services.

  4. (d)

    Wearables and digital phenotyping: The mobile devices and other wearable accessories we use have the potential to collect vast amounts of information about our health. Newer approaches look to collect information such as changes in the speed of our typing or motor movements, or the searches we repeat and use these to make estimates about the status of our cognitive and neurological health in real time–an approach called digital phenotyping. This could aid in monitoring persons suffering from dementia or mild cognitive deficits. It could also be used to explore trajectories of development in children and adolescents, and could help inform early intervention programmes. Over and above monitoring, the use of digital assistants could be used to guide and shape behaviour in real time, provide cognitive aids and reduce dependency as well as the burden on caregivers for some tasks.

  5. (e)

    Virtual Reality and Augmented reality: Virtual reality (VR) refers to an interactive immersive experience wherein a computer generated world which a user can interact with is simulated with either a screen or a heads-up display. Augmented reality systems allow perception of the environment around along with the simulated projection. It’s also used to refer to situations where mobile phones or wearables can be used to interact with the environment around to either generate a virtual experience or provide additional information.

    It’s been used as an application for interventions in phobias for some time. Recent gains in the technology have coincided with an expansion of uses to cognitive rehabilitation, social skills training and even craving management in alcohol use disorders [7]. The number of mental health professionals available to deliver these services is low compared to demand and unequally distributed. With the evolution of mobile systems that can deliver VR experiences, such as the Google Daydream platform, it may be possible to translate some of these packages into content that can be delivered across such platforms with fidelity. There is still some work to be done about how perception of such experiences can affect symptoms in those with mental illness, and even if the same visual illusions are perceived differently.

  6. (f)

    Social networks, communication apps and peer support: Social networks and social media increasingly influence information access and viewpoints. They can serve as accepting communities to which people can feel as if they belong. They can also carry risks, including the spread of myths and misconceptions. Peer support groups, much like other networks, are now easier to form and to find. Hence, the potential for persons with mental illness to be involved in advocacy movements and to influence public policy is unprecedented, if still underutilised. The ability to use social networks and the internet to market products and expand networks can help those who chose to be entrepreneurs have greater reach and exposure. The ability to use these networks effectively, and other marketing skills, would also become a skill set that requires mentoring in.

  7. (g)

    The use of learning networks: Virtual classrooms and virtual learning networks have the potential to raise standards of care delivery by spreading best care practices and knowledge. Initiatives like the ECHO network and the Virtual Knowledge Network, NIMHANS can help spread the expertise of institutes by mentoring professionals who are involved in care delivery. They can also serve as ways to allow different institutes to demonstrate their own best practices and innovative models of service delivery to their peers.

The future of psychiatric practice, including psychiatric rehabilitation, in relation to virtual reality, technology and gadgets is likely to change with advances in technology and their usage [8]. While the tools that are available are changing, they will still be guided by the principles that form the bedrock of good practice in rehabilitation. Patients and their families may be drawn to online resources for rehabilitation.

The current issue of the journal is rather healthy with seventeen articles. And there is a good global distribution as well, with descriptions of mental health and rehabilitation services in Vietnam, Nigeria, USA, UK, Canada, Malaysia, and Iran. These have also covered a wide range of themes, from recovery scales, models for community based rehabilitation and community participation, in patient services, first episode psychosis, helping mothers with intellectual disabilities, and infertility. In addition, a book review on a very useful book on challenges of care giving for mental illness, cover an interesting spectrum of articles.

Source: E-Rehabilitation: New Reality or Virtual Need? | SpringerLink

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[WEB SITE] Five of the best apps to train your brain

It is no secret that as we age, our brain function declines. However, studies have suggested that keeping mentally active – particularly when older – can help to maintain cognitive functioning. Brain training apps are considered a useful aid for mental stimulation, but which one is right for you? We present our pick of five of the best brain training apps around.
[An illustration of a brain and technology]

Research has suggested that brain training may be beneficial for cognitive functioning.

Brain training is based on the premise that mental stimulation can improve neuroplasticity. This is the brain’s ability to form and reorganize connections between brain cells in response to new tasks.

While some studies have failed to find a link between brain training and improved cognitive functioning, other research has found the opposite.

A study published in PLOS One in 2013, for example, found that young adults who engaged in brain training games demonstrated improvements in brain processing speed, working memory, and executive functions.

It is not only young adults who might benefit from brain training. Research presented at the 2016 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference found that older adults who took part in ten 1-hour brain training sessions over a 5-week period were 48 percent less likely to develop cognitive decline or dementia over 10 years.

Such studies have fueled the development of hundreds of brain training apps, many of which claim to improve cognitive functions such as learning, memory, and concentration. With so many to choose from, however, how do you know which one is best for you?

Medical News Today have tried and tested five of the best brain training apps available to help you make an informed decision.

Lumosity: Colorful and fun

Considered by many as the “original” brain training app, Lumosity is used by more than 85 million people across the globe. The app consists of more than 50 colorful and fun minigames designed to train five cognitive functions: speed, memory, attention, flexibility, and problem-solving.

Lumosity’s games have been created with the help of more than 100 researchers from around the world. Furthermore, their website cites a study of more than 4,700 adults that found that brain training with Lumosity improved cognition more than crosswords.

[Lumosity iOS image]

Lumosity has more than 85 million users worldwide. Image credit: Lumosity

With this in mind, we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to try the app for ourselves.

At sign-up, you are required to complete a “fit test,” which calibrates your speed, attention, and memory through three separate games.

Once the games are complete, users are shown how their results compare with those of other users in the same age group. This provides insight into the areas of cognition that require the most attention.

Each day going forward, Lumosity sends a reminder to complete a brain “workout.” The daily brain workout involves playing three minigames – five with the premium version – each focusing on the five cognitive functions.

One game we enjoyed was Train of Thought, which focuses on attention. In this game, the user must change the direction of train tracks, with the aim of guiding different colored trains to the correct home. We found that this game really challenged our concentration – although it could be frustrating at times.

Luminosity is an app that could easily appeal to both children and adults. Many of the games – such as Highway Hazards, a driving game that involves moving left or right to avoid road hazards – have a child-like appeal.

Lumosity is free to download on Android and iOS, though upgrading to a premium subscription costs $11.99 per month or $59.99 for 1 year.

Elevate: Boosting ‘productivity, earning power, and self-confidence’

While Elevate has fewer users than Lumosity, at 10 million downloads worldwide, it holds the title of iPhone’s best app of the year for 2014. So what makes it stand out?

The app consists of more than 40 minigames designed to boost math and speaking skills, as well as improve memory, attention, and processing speed.

[Elevate app]

Just like Lumosity, Elevate encourages daily brain training, which involves the completion of three games, or five games with the “PRO” version.

Elevate has more of an adult feel than many of the other brain training apps; the minigames take a more serious approach, focusing less on colorful illustrations and more on text. Each game also comes with a brief description of its goal, such as “stop mixing up commonly confused words” and “improve your reading comprehension.”

One game we enjoyed was Error Avoidance, whereby the user is required to “keep” or “swap” two words in a passage of text within a set time. For example: “He fashioned the cookie doe into the shape of a grazing dough.” In this case, the two words would be swapped.

Elevate provides a daily, weekly, and monthly rundown of overall performance, as well as performance in five specific areas: writing, listening, speaking, reading, and math. If you’re feeling competitive, you have the option of comparing your performance with that of other users in the same age group.

Elevate is available to download for free on both Android and iOS. Upgrading to PRO costs $4.99 for 1 month or $39.99 for a year.

Peak: Flexible training and tracking

Rated by Google as one of the best Android apps for 2016, Peak offers more than 30 minigames to help improve concentration, memory, mental agility, language, and problem-solving.

[Peak app]These games have been developed with the help of scientists from respectable universities across the globe, including Yale University in Connecticut and the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.

Like Lumosity, there are a number of games that may appeal to children and adults alike. One such game is Turtle Traffic – a mental agility game that requires the user to navigate a turtle through the sea and collect jellyfish.

Based on performance in baseline tests, a personalized workout plan is provided, although the user is not limited to this plan. In the “Pro” version, all games are available to play at any time.

The Peak creators recommend brain training for 3 days per week. One great feature of Peak is that you can select the days that you want to train and set reminders for these days.

Cognitive performance is also very easy to track. Not only does the app provide information on individual game performance, but it also provides data on overall performance in each of the five cognitive functions. Similar to the other brain training apps, you are also able to compare performance with other users.

Peak is available to download for free on Android and iOS. A 12-month subscription starts from $34.99, while 1 month starts from $4.99.

Fit Brains: Targeting emotional intelligence

Fit Brains is a creation of Rosetta Stone – an education technology software company best known for their online language courses.

[Fit brains app]This brain training app boasts the largest variety, with more than 60 minigames and more than 500 personalized training programs. With the input of neuroscientists, these games have been created to help exercise key cognitive functions, including concentration, memory, speed of thinking, and problem-solving.

What sets Fit Brains part from other brain training apps, however, is that it also targets emotional intelligence through games that focus on social skills, social awareness, self-awareness, and self-control.

One game we enjoyed at MNT was Speedy Sorts – a game that tests thinking speed by asking the user to arrange objects into the correct piles as quickly as possible.

Based on the results of each game played, the user is provided with a score out of 200 for each cognitive area. The app also compares individual results with those of other users.

Unlike many other brain training apps, Fit Brains also has a school edition – a brain training package that aims to boost the cognitive functions of schoolchildren.

Fit Brains is free to download on Android and iOS. An upgrade to premium costs $9.99 for a month and $49.99 for a year.

CogniFit: For consumers, scientists, and clinicians

CogniFit is perhaps the most advanced brain training app we reviewed, consisting of a variety of minigames designed to train more than 20 cognitive skills, including short-term memory, planning, hand-eye coordination, and auditory perception.

[CogniFit app]

The CogniFit developers are keen to point out that all of their brain training tools have been validated by scientists – including researchers from the University of Washington and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. Furthermore, they state that the efficacy of their tools has been established through general population studies.

Interestingly, CogniFit also offers tools that researchers and healthcare professionals can use in order to study and assess cognitive function in patients.

MNT tested the brain training games for consumers, and we found them to be a good balance of fun and mental stimulation.

One game we enjoyed was Reaction Field, which tests response time, visual scanning, and inhibition – which is the ability to control impulsive behavior. This game is similar to Whac-a-Mole; the user is required to remember the color of a mole and tap on moles of the same color as they pop up from holes in the ground.

Individual cognitive performance is assessed using the Lumosity Performance Index, which is calculated using the average scores of all games played. Like the other brain training apps, you can also compare your performance against that of other users.

CogniFit is available to download for free on Android and iOS. A premium upgrade costs $19.99 for 1 month or $189.99 for a year.

Learn about five of the best meditation apps.

Source: Five of the best apps to train your brain – Medical News Today

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[WEB SITE] Helping you find the right app after a Stroke or Brain Injury

Find the right apps to aid rehabilitation and recovery. Our NHS specialists have trialed thousands of apps and selected the best.

3 in 1

Honest feedback and ratings provided helping you make the choice that is right for you.

“Apps tell you how you’ve done …. you want to do better. Not scary.” (Stroke Patient)

“Excellent, user-friendly website ….reliable assessment, description and app reviews… would recommend” (Charles Brain Injury Therapist)

Top Rated Apps

SitFit

Free

iOS

Primary Use:

Being Active

Free Flow

Free

iOS Android

Primary Use:

Thinking

Peak

Free

iOS Android

Primary Use:

Thinking

Change4Life Be Food Smart

Free

iOS Android

Primary Use:

Eating and Drinking

Bla Bla Bla

Free

iOS

Primary Use:

Communication

Balloon Frenzy!

Free

iOS Android

Primary Use:

Arms and Fingers

Couch to 5K

Free

iOS Android

Primary Use:

Being Active

Lumosity

Free

iOS Android

Primary Use:

Thinking

Sudoku

Free

iOS Android

Primary Use:

Thinking

Color me

Free

iOS

Primary Use:

Relaxing

Language Therapy

Free

iOS Android

Primary Use:

Communication

Headspace

Free

iOS Android

Primary Use:

My Mood

What’s New

Jointly – for carers

£2.99

iOS

Primary Use:

Got questions

Alpha Topics AAC

£4.99

iOS

Primary Use:

Communication

Advanced Comprehension

£23.99

iOS

Primary Use:

Communication

Advanced Naming

£23.99

iOS

Primary Use:

Communication

Apraxia

£23.99

iOS

Primary Use:

Communication

OT Magazine

Free

iOS

Primary Use:

Got questions

Source: Helping you find the right app after a Stroke or Brain Injury – MyTherappy

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[WEB SITE] 5 Top Apps For People With Limited Mobility – Assistive Technology Blog

 

This post was written by Andrew Atkinson from www.mobilitysmart.cc.

Using a wheelchair or mobility scooter can mean that certain places and activities are off-limits.

The world is not designed for people on wheels. Many with disabilities, including the elderly, find themselves restricted in their day-to-day lives.

Technology can help. As well as specific gadgets and devices, users of wheelchairs and scooters can get a lot from iPads and Android tablets.

Here are five of the best apps for people with limited mobility. Why not add an iPad holder to your electric or manual wheelchair, then check out these five applications to add to your device?

Wheelmap

Perhaps the most useful app that you can add to your device.

Wheelmap categorises buildings and public spaces as fully accessible, partially accessible or not accessible, so that you can see where your wheelchair will fit.

This is an app for everyone to get involved with. Many places are still categorised as unknown, so any user can contribute for the benefit of others.

In some towns and cities, Wheelmap is an extremely valuable and detailed resource. In others, it has the potential to be a wheelchair-user’s best digital friend.

Wheelmate

Whilst Wheelmap covers buildings, venues and public spaces, Wheelmate focuses specifically on life’s little practicalities – wheelchair accessible toilets and parking spaces.

The premise is much the same, though the aim is different. Wheelmate also includes mention of which car parks are free, and which you’ll need to pay for.

Skype

Navigating the world often requires two hands.

Install Skype to your device, clip it to your wheelchair or mobility scooter and talk to friends and family on the go.

Skype’s video call functionality makes it incredibly easy to have phonecalls whilst  in your local supermarket. Which flavour pasta sauce did your husband ask for, again?

Uber

For long-distance travel, Uber is a valuable app.

Uber taxis come in all shapes and sizes. You can book one at the touch of a button.

What’s more, you can specifically look for wheelchair accessible vehicles!

You don’t even need cash when you book your taxi. The service offers cashless payment, which is ideal if you’re stuck and need a little help getting home.

Tecla Access

The Tecla Access product is designed to make your smartphone or tablet completely hands-free. It’s ideal if you need to be occupied controlling your wheels, rather than controlling your phone.

Tecla is designed for mobility scooters and electric wheelchairs, and it does require the purchase of additional equipment. But, once it’s set up, you can use motions like blinking and blowing, and can also use the controls on your wheelchair or scooter, to access every feature on your usually-handheld device.

With the right app combination, you can use Tecla Access to control every aspect of your home as well. This means that it’s easy to develop a smart home that is more accessible than ever before.

Source: 5 Top Apps For People With Limited Mobility – Assistive Technology Blog

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[ARTICLE] Anxiety — Is There an App for That? Considering Technology, Psychiatry, and Internet-Assisted Cognitive Behavioral Therapy – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Across Western countries, more than a third of people will have a mental health disorder over their lifetime; mood and anxiety disorders are the most common. The effectiveness of psychological interventions is well established. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), for example, is as effective for mild and moderate anxiety as medica‐ tions; combined psychopharmacology and CBT is superior to either modality alone, suggesting a synergistic effect. However, CBT requires a major investment of time and resources. Thus, in public systems, CBT has limited availability and is subject to long waiting times; primary-care physicians and psychiatrists may not offer CBT.

Can technology address the deficiency of psychological interventions for mental illness? Internet therapies (including smart phone apps) have been developed, offering CBT and other psychological interventions. In this chapter, we focus on Internet-assisted CBT (ICBT).

ICBT allows patients to receive ongoing CBT with easier and quicker access, at reduced cost, and with increased convenience over traditional CBT. We review evidence from randomized trials and meta-analyses, which strongly support the use of ICBT in clinical practice, especially in combination with ongoing therapist support. We consider government experimentation with ICBT, with a particular focus on Australia. We also present a case demonstrating the clinical application of ICBT. Finally, with an eye to the future, we will look at potential research questions.

Full Text PDF

 

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[Pinterest] Apps4OTs on Pinterest

Contexts of Participation: an interactive tool which promotes critical thinking around participation, developed by Rayya Ghul and Dr Ian Marsh, senior lecturers in Occupational Therapy in the Department of Allied Health Professions at Canterbury Christ Church University.#Apps4OTs

These are some of the apps that are available which may be suitable for OTs or service users. These apps are not endorsed by BAOT/COT – we aim to list as many as possible to make OTs aware of the options available. If you have used any of these apps, please do leave a comment to tell others what you thought!

Continue —>  #Apps4OTs on Pinterest | Apps, App and Apraxia.

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[WEB SITE] Life-Changing Mobile Apps for People with Brain Injury – Brainline

Almost every day, we hear of new mobile device applications (“apps”) developed for just about everything — from staying organized to finding pharmacies or restaurants while on the road. It’s hard to keep up.

Apps photo no captionThe BrainLine team sorted through many resources to compile this list of apps for mobile devices for people with a brain injury, their families and caregivers.

Some of these apps have proven to be especially helpful for people with brain injury. The phone can be used to remind you of an upcoming appointment or to take medication, or it can be used like a traditional paper notebook to keep all your addresses, telephone numbers, calendar items, lists, and ideas. Please note that BrainLine does not endorse these or any specific products.

Continue —>  Life-Changing Mobile Apps for People with Brain Injury.

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[WEB SITE] Neurologists evaluate application of smartphones in epilepsy care

While many people with epilepsy can control their seizures with medication, those unpredictable and involuntary changes in behavior and consciousness can be limiting for others. Neurologists writing in the International Journal of Epilepsy evaluated the application of smartphones in epilepsy care.

The paper by Lakshmi Narasimhan Ranganathan and colleagues at the Madras Medical College Institute of Neurology in India has been selected for an Elsevier Atlas Award.

Ranganathan’s team evaluated the mobile applications available for the everyday care of patients with epilepsy. Those apps include seizure diaries as well as medication trackers with reminders to take the next dose of medication. In addition, apps are available to answer any questions patients with epilepsy might have, to detect potential drug interactions and to detect seizures. The latter type of apps senses the irregular motions characteristic of an epileptic seizure and automatically set off an alarm to alert caregivers and doctors.

“Almost all smartphones have a built-in GPS,” Ranganathan said. “They have motion detectors and/or accelerometers. All of those gadgets, if properly integrated into a program, support epilepsy management.”

Ranganathan is already encouraging his patients to take advantage of these technologies. He predicts smartphones will be capable of much more. Already, researchers have shown it is possible to monitor electrical activity in the brain with a headset that sends the electroencephalography (EEG) signal directly to a smartphone. Continuous EEG monitoring could detect the spikes in activity that typically precedes seizures, to alert patients in advance..

The authors say that special sensors integrated into smartphones might allow continuous drug monitoring too. Rather than taking anti-epileptic drugs continuously and suffering from their cognitive side effects, people might take those drugs only when a seizure is coming on.

With almost one percent of people below the age of 20 and three percent of the total population suffering from epilepsy, and 30 percent of those patients refractory to medication, the development and adoption of these apps is of indisputable benefit.

via Neurologists evaluate application of smartphones in epilepsy care.

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[WEB SITE] OT Cafe: Celebrating OT Month – Apps created by OTs

 

Goto Applications —> OT Cafe: Celebrating OT Month | Apps created by OTs.

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