Posts Tagged foot drop

[VIDEO] WalkAide® Demonstration – YouTube

Published on Mar 29, 2012

WalkAide® patient Connie Fowble demonstrates how the Walkaide® benefits her daily life. She shows the previous orthotic device that she used prior to being fit with the Walkaide®. For more information call 877-4HANGER or visit http://www.hanger.com.

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[WEB SITE] Research report explores the foot drop implants market

Foot drop can be defined as an abnormality in the gait where the forefoot drops due to factors such as weakness of the ankle and toe dorsiflexion. The abnormality is also caused by paralysis of the muscles in the anterior portion of the lower leg or damage to the fibular nerve.

Foot drop can be associated with various conditions, including peripheral nerve injuries, neuropathies, drug toxicities, dorsiflexor injuries, and diabetes. Anatomic, muscular, and neurologic are the three categories of foot drop.

Functional electrical stimulation technology is employed in the foot drop implant to improve the gait of patients and avoid foot drop or tripping while walking. Functional electric stimulators (FES) can either be implanted within the patient’s body or employed externally.External FES is tested on the patient prior to its implantation. Implant FES involves a surgery in which the electrodes are directly placed on the nerves of the patient, which are controlled by the implant placed under the skin.

The FES device activates the implant through a wireless antenna that is worn outside the body. Sensors are also associated with FES which trigger events in the walking pattern such as lifting of the heel, thereby stimulating the nerves.

Obtain Report Details at
www.transparencymarketresearch.com/foot-drop-implants-market.html

The advantages of implant FES include reduction in sensation that is associated with external stimulation. In addition, it eliminates the need to adjust the electrodes on the skin on a daily basis.

Rise in number of foot drop disorders due to nerve injuries, growth in knee and hip replacement therapies that lead to foot drop disorders, and increase in the number of sports related injuries contribute to the growth of the foot drop implants market. Foot drop disorders are commonly observed in diabetic retinopathy patients and this prevalence is growing due to increase in incidence of diabetes, which is propelling the growth of the market.

Furthermore, the market players are focus on research and development to increase the number of foot drop implant products available in the market, driving the market growth. However, lack of reimbursement, high cost of the implants, and low awareness among the people are likely to hinder the growth of the foot drop implants market in the near future.

The global foot drop implants market can be segmented on the basis of product, end-user, and region. On the basis of product, the market is categorized into functional electrical stimulators and internal fixation devices.

The internal fixation devices segment is anticipated to record a significant growth during the forecast period owing to increasing demand for the devices and advantages offered by these devices such as elimination of the need to stimulate the electrodes daily. Based on end-user, the market can be segmented into hospitals, orthopedic centers, and palliative care centers, among others.

The orthopedic centers segment is anticipated to record a high growth during the forecast period due to the increasing number of foot drop cases due to injuries.

Geographically, the foot drop implants market is distributed over North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Middle East & Africa. North America dominated the market in 2016 and is anticipated to continue its dominance during the forecast period.

The significant growth of the market in the region can be attributed to the strong focus on research and development, increase in health care spending, and growth in awareness about the abnormality. The sluggish economy might have a negative impact on the market growth of Europe.

Asia Pacific is anticipated to record a high CAGR during the forecast period, primarily driven by India and China. The rising disposable income is anticipated to contribute to the growth of the Asia Pacific market.

In addition, a factor contributing to the market growth is rise in prevalence of diabetes that leads to diabetic retinopathy, which is one of the primary causes of foot drop.

Key players operating in the foot drop implants market include Finetech Medical, Arthrex, Inc., Zimmer Biomet, Bioness Inc., Stryker Corporation, Wright Medical Group N.V., Ottobock, Narang Medical Limited, PONTiS Orthopaedics, LLC, and Shanghai MicroPort Orthopedics.

The report offers a comprehensive evaluation of the market. It does so via in-depth qualitative insights, historical data, and verifiable projections about market size.

The projections featured in the report have been derived using proven research methodologies and assumptions. By doing so, the research report serves as a repository of analysis and information for every facet of the market, including but not limited to: Regional markets, technology, types, and applications.

Report:
www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=B&rep_id=22913

Source: Research report explores the foot drop implants market – WhaTech

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[WEB SITE] The WalkAide System for Treatment of Foot Drop

Discover how The WalkAide System can change lives by helping patients with Foot Drop gain greater mobility and freedom by managing this challenging condition. If your Foot Drop is caused by Multiple Sclerosis, Stroke, Cerebral Palsy, Spinal Cord Injury, or even Traumatic Brain Injury, you may be a candidate for The WalkAide System. The WalkAide System is a sophisticated FDA cleared medical device that uses advanced tilt-sensor technology to analyze the movement of your leg. The WalkAide System uses gentle stimulation to activate leg muscles and prompt your foot to lift with every step, resulting in a more natural walking pattern with less fatigue.

  • • Multiple Sclerosis
  • • Stroke
  • • Cerebral Palsy
  • • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • • Spinal Cord Injury

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[BLOG POST] Get Back On Your Feet with Exercises for Foot Drop – Saebo

Foot drop (sometimes called drop foot or dropped foot) is the inability to raise the front of the foot due to weakness or paralysis of the muscles and nerves that lift the foot. Foot drop itself is not a disease, it is a symptom of a greater problem or medical condition.

You can recognize foot drop by how it affects your gait. Someone with foot drop may drag their toes along the ground when walking because they cannot lift the front of their foot with each step. In order to avoid dragging their toes or tripping they might lift their knee higher or swing their leg in a wide arc instead. This is called steppage gait, and is a coping mechanism for foot drop issues.

Causes of Foot Drop

There are three main causes of the weakened nerves or muscles that lead to foot drop:

1: Nerve Injury. The peroneal nerve is the nerve that communicates to the muscles that lift the foot. Damage to the peroneal nerve is the most common cause of foot drop. The nerve wraps from the back of the knee to the front of the shin and sits closely to the surface, making it easy to damage. Damage to the peroneal nerve can be caused by sports injuries, hip or knee replacement surgery, a leg cast, childbirth or even crossing your legs.

2: Muscle Disorders. A condition that causes the muscles to slowly weaken or deteriorate can also cause foot drop. These disorders may include muscular dystrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease) and polio.

3: Brain or Spinal Disorders. Neurological conditions can also cause foot drop. Conditions may include stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS), cerebral palsy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

How Foot Drop is Treated

Treatment for foot drop requires treating the underlying medical condition that caused it. In some cases foot drop can be permanent, but many people are able to recover. There are a number of treatments that can help with foot drop:

1: Surgery

If your foot drop is caused by a pinched nerve or herniated disc then you will likely have surgery to treat it. Surgery may also be necessary to repair muscles or tendons if they were directly damaged and are causing foot drop. In severe or long term cases, you might have surgery to fuse your ankle and foot bones and improve your gait.

2: Functional Electrical Stimulation

If your foot drop is being caused by damage to the peroneal nerve than Functional Electrical Stimulation may be an alternative to surgery. A small device can be worn or surgically implanted just below the knee that will stimulate the normal function of the nerve, causing the muscle to contract and the foot to lift while walking.

3: Braces or Ankle Foot Orthosis (AFO)

Wearing a brace or AFO that supports the foot in a normal position is a common treatment for foot drop. The device will stabilize your foot and ankle and hold the front part of the foot up when walking. While traditionally doctors have prescribed bulky stiff splints that go inside the shoe, the SaeboStep is a lightweight and cost effective option that provides support outside the shoe.

4: Physical Therapy

Therapy to strengthen the foot, ankle, and lower leg muscles is the primary treatment for foot drop and will generally be prescribed in addition to the treatment options mentioned above. Stretching and range of motion exercises will also help prevent stiffness from developing in the heel.

 

Rehabilitation Exercises for Foot Drop

Specific exercises that strengthen the muscles in the foot, ankle and lower leg can help improve the symptoms of foot drop in some cases. Exercises are important for improving range of motion, preventing injury, improving balance and gait, and preventing muscle stiffness.

When treating foot drop, you may work with a physical therapist who will help you get started strengthening your foot, leg and ankle muscles. Rehabilitation for foot drop can be a slow process, so your physical therapist will likely recommend that you continue to do strengthening exercises at home on your own.

By being consistent about your exercises at home, you can maximize your chances of making a successful recovery from foot drop. Strengthening the weakened muscles will allow you to restore normal function and hopefully start walking normally again.

Like any exercise program, please consult your healthcare professional before you begin. Please stop immediately if any of the following exercises cause pain or harm to your body. It’s best to work with a trained professional for guidance and safety.

Towel Stretch

1-towel-stretch

Sit on the floor with both legs straight out in front of you. Loop a towel or exercise band around the affected foot and hold onto the ends with your hands. Pull the towel or band towards your body. Hold for 30 seconds. Then relax for 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

Toe to Heel Rocks

2-toe-heel-rocks

Stand in front of a table, chair, wall, or another sturdy object you can hold onto for support. Rock your weight forward and rise up onto your toes. Hold this position for 5 seconds. Next, rock your weight backwards onto your heels and lift your toes off the ground. Hold for 5 seconds. Repeat the sequence 6 times.

Marble Pickup

3-marble-pickup

Sit in a chair with both feet flat on the floor. Place 20 marbles and a bowl on the floor in front of you. Using the toes of your affected foot, pick up each marble and place it in the bowl. Repeat until you have picked up all the marbles.

Ankle Dorsiflexion

4-ankle-dorsiflexion

Sit on the floor with both legs straight out in front of you. Take a resistance band and anchor it to a stable chair or table leg. Wrap the loop of the band around the top of your affected foot. Slowly pull your toes towards you then return to your starting position. Repeat 10 times.

Plantar Flexion

5-plantar-flexion

Sit on the floor with both legs straight out in front of you. Take a resistance band and wrap it around the bottom of your foot. Hold both ends in your hands. Slowly point your toes then return to your starting position. Repeat 10 times.

Ball Lift

6-ball-lift

Sit in a chair with both feet flat on the floor. Place a small round object on the floor in front of you (about the size of a tennis ball). Hold the object between your feet and slowly lift it by extending your legs. Hold for 5 seconds then slowly lower. Repeat 10 times.

Get Back On Your Feet

Don’t let foot drop affect your mobility, independence, and quality of life. With proper rehabilitation and assistive devices many people are able to overcome the underlying cause of their symptoms and get back to walking normally. If you are showing symptoms of foot drop, talk to a medical professional about your treatment options.

Which Product is Right for Me?


All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

Source: Get Back On Your Feet with Exercises for Foot Drop | Saebo

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[ARTICLE] Immediate effects of ankle eversion taping on dynamic and static balance of chronic stroke patients with foot drop – Full Text PDF

Abstract

[Purpose] This study evaluates the immediate effect of ankle eversion taping on dynamic and static balance of chronic stroke patients with foot drop.

[Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted with nine subjects who were diagnosed with stroke. A cross-over randomized design was used. Each subject performed three interventions in a random order. Subjects were randomly assigned to an ankle everion taping, placebo taping, and no
taping. For dynamic and static balance, ability was measured using BIO Rescue. Limit of stability, sway length and sway speed for one minute were measured. [Results] The Limit of Stability, Sway length and Sway speed differed significantly among the three different taping methods.

[Conclusion] We conclude that ankle eversion taping that uses kinesiology tape instantly increases the dynamic and static balance ability of chronic stroke patients with foot drop.

INTRODUCTION
Generally, stroke patients have severe disabilities such as hemiplegia, abnormal walking, and reduced balance ability. In particular, the decrease of balance ability causes a lot of difficulty in performing activities of daily living, and in severe cases, stroke patients may be exposed to the risk of falling2) . Therefore, restoration of balance ability is one of the most important clinical goals in the rehabilitation of stroke patients3) . Generally, lack of balance ability is caused by various causes, such as spasticity4) , muscle strength weakness4) , and hemiplegia5) , but foot drop, which is caused by stiffness of plantar flexors, weakness of dorsiflexors, and increased spasticity, is one of the most important causes6) . Therefore, foot drop treatment is often a common approach used to restore balance ability clinically, and the most representative treatments are the Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) and Ankle Foot Orthosis (AFO)7).  Recently, a robotic device8) is used to correct foot drop in some cases, but the three treatment methods mentioned above (FES, AFO, and a robotic device) are expensive, inconvenient to carry, and not aesthetically good in appearance.

To overcome these drawbacks, taping that is easily applicable and inexpensive is widely used as an alternative treatment method. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effects of application of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tapes on the dynamic and static balance of patients with foot drop after stroke. […]

Full Text PDF

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[VIDEO] Functional electrical stimulation (FES) talk with Christine Singleton and Sarah Joiner – YouTube

Δημοσιεύτηκε στις 22 Μαρ 2017

Lead Clinical Physiotherapist Christine Singleton and Sarah Joiner who has MS discuss Functional electrical stimulation (FES), how it works, who can use it, how to wear it, does it make a difference and how can you get referred for it. For more information about FES visit our website https://www.mstrust.org.uk/a-z/functi…

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[WEB SIDE] WalkAide & Foot Drop – WalkAide.com

WalkAide & Foot Drop

​​​​WalkAide: Helping​​ You Get a Leg Up on Foot Drop

WalkAide is a class II, FDA cleared medical device, designed to improve walking ability in people experiencing foot drop caused by upper motor neuron injuries or conditions such as:

  • Multiple Sc​​lerosis (MS)​
  • Stroke (CVA)
  • Cerebral Palsy (CP)
  • Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury
  • Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)​​

​Foot Drop or Dropped Foot is a condition caused by weakness or paralysis of the muscles involved in lifting the front part of the foot, which causes a person to drag the toe of the shoe on the ground or slap the foot on the floor.

Foot drop (also known as drop foot) may result from damage to the central nervous system such as stroke, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and multiple sclerosis. The WalkAide is designed to assist with the ability to lift the foot for those individuals who have suffered an injury to their central nervous system. The WalkAide is not designed to work with people who have damage to the lower motor neurons/peripheral nerves.​

WalkAide vs. AFO​

Traditionally, foot drop is treated with bracing using an ankle foot orthosis (AFO). The passive treatement offered by AFOs do not promote active use of neuromuscular systems and also limits ankle range of motion. In addition, AFOs can be uncomfortable, bulky, and, if poorly fitted, produce areas of pressure and tissue breakdown. The WalkAide may replace the traditional AFO to re-engage a person’s existing nerve pathways and muscles. Using the WalkAide, in most cases, frees the patient from AFO restrictions. 

The recruitment of existing muscles results in reduction of atrophy and walking fatigue – a common side effect of foot bracing. WalkAide users have the freedom to walk with or without footwear, up and down the stairs, and even sidestep.

Comparison of Benefits of Functional Electrical
Stimulation (FES) and Ankle Foot Orthosis (AFO) for Foot Drop​

AFO = ankle foot orthosis • FES = functional electrical stimulation • ROM = range of motion
​​

Advanced Technology; Easy to Use

​​​Invented by a team of researchers at the University of Alberta, WalkAide uses functional electrical stimulation (FES) to restore typical nerve-to-muscle signals in the leg and foot, effectively lifting the foot at the appropriate time. The resulting movement is a smoother, more natural and safer stepping motion. It may allow faster walking for longer distances with less fatigue. In fact, many people who try WalkAide experience immediate and substantial improvement in their walking ability, which increases their mobility, functionality, and overall independence.

​A sophisticated medical device, WalkAide uses advanced tilt sensor technology to analyze the movement of your leg. This tilt sensor adjust the timing of stimulation for every step. The system sends electrical signals or stimulation to the peroneal nerve, which controls movement in your ankle and foot. These gentle electrical impulses activate the muscles to raise your foot at the appropriate time during the step cycle.

​Although highly-advanced, WalkAide is surprisingly small and easy to use. It consists of a AA battery-operated, single-channel electrical stimulator, two electrodes, and electrode leads. WalkAide is applied directly to the leg — not implanted underneath the skin — which means no surgery is involved. A cuff holds the system comfortably in place, and it can be worn discreetly under most clothing. With the WalkAide’s patented Tilt Sensor technology, most users do not require additional external wiring or remote heel sensors.

​​WalkAide Provides the Advantages not Found in Typical Foot Drop Treamtents :

  • Easy one-handed operation and application
  • Small, self-contained unit
  • Does not require orthopedic or special shoes
  • May be worn barefoot or with slippers
  • Minimal contact means minimal discomfort with reduced perspiration
  • May improve circulation, reduce atrophy, improve voluntary control and increase joint range of motion

Customized For Individual Walking Pattern

​WalkAide is not a one size fits all device. Rather, a specially trained medical professional customizes and fits the WalkAide. Using WalkAnalyst, a multifaceted computer software program, the clinician can tailor WalkAide to an individual’s walking pattern for optimal effectiveness.

Exercise Mode for Home Use

​In addition fo walking assistance, the WalkAide system includes a pre-programmable exercise mode that allows a user to exercise his/her muscles while resting for a set period of time as prescribed.​

Visit Site —> WalkAide & Foot Drop – WalkAide.com

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[WEB SITE] Foot Drop: Causes, Prevention and How You can Treat It

What is foot drop & what causes it?

Foot drop is a simple name but its cause and treatment may be less than simple.

If you are unable to lift your foot up at the ankle and it makes walking difficult, you may have something called foot drop. This could be due to weakness in one of the muscles responsible for lifting, or dorsiflexing, your foot. It could also be caused by tightness or spasticity in the calf muscles of your leg that cause your toes to point downward.

The cause of foot drop can be from several different sources – neurological, muscular, a side effect from medication, or from a lack of movement.

People with stroke, multiple sclerosis, acquired brain injury, spinal cord injury, or cerebral palsy have a central neurological reason causing weakness, tightness or spasticity. People with peripheral neurologic disease may also have foot drop. These diagnoses could include neuropathy, injury to the lower spinal cord, nerve damage, or illnesses like Guillain-Barre syndrome.

Those who have a traumatic accident or muscular damage could also suffer from foot drop because of damage from swelling and compression.

Certain medications are known to potentially cause foot drop. Talk to your doctor about your medications.

Foot drop can also occur in people who are in bed for a prolonged amount of time. When lying on your back, gravity pulls down your foot, and can cause weakness and overstretch the muscles and nerves on the front of your lower leg.

Can foot drop be prevented?

If you or your loved one is required to be on bedrest or immobile, you can help to prevent foot drop by using a padded splint, by doing stretching, and by doing active exercises like ankle pumps.

If you have an underlying condition, it may be impossible to fully prevent foot drop from occurring. But often you can improve the flexibility and strength in your leg, or use an orthosis or splint to help maintain your foot in a position that will allow you to walk and move safely.

How can foot drop be treated?

The treatment of foot drop depends on the cause and the symptoms you have. Below are some suggestions on what you can do, but make sure to talk to your doctor, therapist or orthotist about the best treatment options for you.

Keep your foot and ankle flexible:

  • Use a foot splint at night

  • Complete daily stretches. The ProStretch gives a great stretch

Improve the tone in your leg:

  • Use an orthosis that puts your ankle in a slight stretch

Strengthen your leg:

  • Use neuromuscular electrical stimulation

  • Complete exercises against gravity or with resistance like a Theraband

  • Stand on a variety of surfaces like an Airex balance pad or a Bosu ball to challenge your muscles in your legs. Hold onto something sturdy or have someone nearby to help

Improve the safety of your walking and prevent falls:

  • Use an ankle foot orthosis to keep your toes up when walking. Depending on your strength level, you may need a flexible one or a rigid one

  • Walk with an assistive device, like a walker or cane

  • Modify your home to prevent you from tripping or falling – consider removing rugs and floor clutter, sitting on a shower chair instead of standing, and observe your home for other potential hazards

Prevent skin problems with the use of splints and orthotics:

  • Make sure to check your skin after you’ve been wearing it, and more often if you have impaired sensation in your legs, diabetes, or a history of wounds. Use a hand held inspection mirror to help

Keep the rest of yourself of healthy:

  • Consider activities like stationary biking or swimming to complete overall strengthening and conditioning

  • Strengthen your core muscles to improve your overall balance and stability

What are the dangers of not treating foot drop?

The biggest risk of not treating foot drop is tripping and falling. Falls lead to injury and other unnecessary treatments or hospitalizations. In order to clear your toes to avoid falling, you will have to change the way you walk. Over time, this could lead to pain or discomfort in your back or legs. Also, if your ankle loses flexibility and you cannot move it at you may need surgery.

Most importantly, without treatment you will have more difficulty doing the things in life that you enjoy doing. Unfortunately, there may be no cure, but there are things you can do to help improve the quality of your life.

Who should I ask for more information?

If you have already been diagnosed or are concerned about your risk for foot drop, you should speak with your healthcare provider about what you can do to prevent and treat it.

Source: Foot Drop: Causes, Prevention and How You can Treat It

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[WEB SITE] Bioness Receives FDA Clearance for the L300 Go™ System.

VALENCIA, Calif., Feb. 07, 2017 /PRNewswire/

Bioness, Inc., the leading provider of cutting-edge, clinically supported rehabilitation therapies, today announced that it received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the L300 Go System. The L300 Go builds upon the global success of the company’s NESS L300® Foot Drop System and NESS L300 Plus® System with numerous advancements, including the introduction of 3D motion detection of gait events, multi-channel stimulation and a mobile iOS application to track user activity.

Gait movement disorders, such as foot drop and knee instability, are often associated with an upper motor neuron disease such as stroke and multiple sclerosis as well as injuries to the brain and spinal cord. Individuals with an impaired gait have less control over their lower extremity muscles and are at an increased risk for falls. The L300 Go is the first functional electrical stimulation (FES) system to offer 3D motion detection of gait events and muscle activation using data from a 3-axis gyroscope and accelerometer.  Patient movement is monitored in all three kinematic planes and stimulation is deployed precisely when needed during the gait cycle.  An adaptive, learning algorithm accommodates changes in gait dynamics, and a high speed processor that deploys stimulation within 10 milliseconds of detecting a valid gait event.  This rapid, reliable response is critical and supports user confidence.

The new myBioness™ mobile iOS application allows home users of the system to track activity, set personal goals and review their progress over time using dynamic reporting capabilities. The app has been designed to keep users engaged in the rehabilitation process and motivated to meet their recovery goals.

Multi-channel stimulation is an additional noteworthy L300 Go feature that allows clinicians to precisely control the amount of dorsiflexion and inversion/eversion the system provides. Using a new, proprietary electrode, medial and lateral stimulation can be adjusted independently. This more efficient fitting process saves valuable time and facilitates more productive therapy sessions.

“The healthcare system is being challenged to objectively document and improve functional capabilities. To help meet these demands, clinicians are turning to technologies that speed up rehabilitation timelines and provide a personalized recovery plan,” said Todd Cushman, President and CEO of Bioness. “Technological innovations including 3D motion detection and multi-channel stimulation work together to improve treatment efficiency and promote patient mobility. At Bioness, we are focused on improving the lives of patients through technology and are proud to add the L300 Go into our growing portfolio of products.”

The L300 Go System was cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on January 27, 2017.  The system is indicated to provide ankle dorsiflexion in adult and pediatric individuals with foot drop and/or assist knee flexion or extension in adult individuals with muscle weakness related to upper motor neuron disease/injury (e.g., stroke, damage to pathways to the spinal cord). The L300 Go System electrically stimulates muscles in the affected leg to provide ankle dorsiflexion of the foot and/or knee flexion or extension; thus, it also may improve the individual’s gait.

Bioness will begin commercial release of the L300 Go in the spring of 2017. Initially, the system will only be available to healthcare professionals for clinic use. Home user availability is targeted for the later part of 2017. Current users of the L300 Foot Drop System and L300 Plus System will be eligible for a Customer Loyalty Upgrade Program which is designed to make the new technology more accessible for users in the clinic and community.

About Bioness, Inc.
Bioness is the leading provider of innovative technologies helping people regain mobility and independence. Bioness solutions include implantable and external neuromodulation systems, robotic systems and software based therapy programs providing functional and therapeutic benefits for individuals affected by pain, central nervous system disorders and orthopedic injuries. Currently, Bioness offers six medical devices within its commercial portfolio which are distributed and sold on five continents and in over 25 countries worldwide. Our technologies have been implemented in the most prestigious and well-respected institutions around the globe with approximately 90% of the top rehabilitation hospitals in the United States currently using one or more Bioness solution.  Bioness has a singular focus on aiding large, undeserved customer groups with innovative, evidence-based solutions and we will continue to develop and make commercially available new products that address the growing and changing needs of our customers. Individual results vary. Consult with a qualified physician to determine if this product is right for you. Contraindications, adverse reactions and precautions are available online at www.bioness.com.

Source: Bioness Receives FDA Clearance for the L300 Go™ System

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[Abstract] Feasibility Study of a Take-Home Array-Based Functional Electrical Stimulation System With Automated Setup for Current Functional Electrical Stimulation Users With Foot-Drop

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the feasibility of unsupervised community use of an array-based automated setup functional electrical stimulator for current foot-drop functional electrical stimulation (FES) users.

Design

Feasibility study.

Setting

Gait laboratory and community use.

Participants

Participants (N=7) with diagnosis of unilateral foot-drop of central neurologic origin (>6mo) who were regular users of a foot-drop FES system (>3mo).

Intervention

Array-based automated setup FES system for foot-drop (ShefStim).

Main Outcome Measures

Logged usage, logged automated setup times for the array-based automated setup FES system and diary recording of problems experienced, all collected in the community environment. Walking speed, ankle angles at initial contact, foot clearance during swing, and the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology version 2.0 (QUEST version 2.0) questionnaire, all collected in the gait laboratory.

Results

All participants were able to use the array-based automated setup FES system. Total setup time took longer than participants’ own FES systems, and automated setup time was longer than in a previous study of a similar system. Some problems were experienced, but overall, participants were as satisfied with this system as their own FES system. The increase in walking speed (N=7) relative to no stimulation was comparable between both systems, and appropriate ankle angles at initial contact (N=7) and foot clearance during swing (n=5) were greater with the array-based automated setup FES system.

Conclusions

This study demonstrates that an array-based automated setup FES system for foot-drop can be successfully used unsupervised. Despite setup’s taking longer and some problems, users are satisfied with the system and it would appear as effective, if not better, at addressing the foot-drop impairment. Further product development of this unique system, followed by a larger-scale and longer-term study, is required before firm conclusions about its efficacy can be reached.

Source: Feasibility Study of a Take-Home Array-Based Functional Electrical Stimulation System With Automated Setup for Current Functional Electrical Stimulation Users With Foot-Drop – Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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