Posts Tagged lower extremity

[ARTICLE] Movement visualisation in virtual reality rehabilitation of the lower limb: a systematic review – Full Text

Abstract

Background

Virtual reality (VR) based applications play an increasing role in motor rehabilitation. They provide an interactive and individualized environment in addition to increased motivation during motor tasks as well as facilitating motor learning through multimodal sensory information. Several previous studies have shown positive effect of VR-based treatments for lower extremity motor rehabilitation in neurological conditions, but the characteristics of these VR applications have not been systematically investigated. The visual information on the user’s movement in the virtual environment, also called movement visualisation (MV), is a key element of VR-based rehabilitation interventions. The present review proposes categorization of Movement Visualisations of VR-based rehabilitation therapy for neurological conditions and also summarises current research in lower limb application.

Methods

A systematic search of literature on VR-based intervention for gait and balance rehabilitation in neurological conditions was performed in the databases namely; MEDLINE (Ovid), AMED, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycInfo. Studies using non-virtual environments or applications to improve cognitive function, activities of daily living, or psychotherapy were excluded. The VR interventions of the included studies were analysed on their MV.

Results

In total 43 publications were selected based on the inclusion criteria. Seven distinct MV groups could be differentiated: indirect MV (N = 13), abstract MV (N = 11), augmented reality MV (N = 9), avatar MV (N = 5), tracking MV (N = 4), combined MV (N = 1), and no MV (N = 2). In two included articles the visualisation conditions included different MV groups within the same study. Additionally, differences in motor performance could not be analysed because of the differences in the study design. Three studies investigated different visualisations within the same MV group and hence limited information can be extracted from one study.

Conclusions

The review demonstrates that individuals’ movements during VR-based motor training can be displayed in different ways. Future studies are necessary to fundamentally explore the nature of this VR information and its effect on motor outcome.

Background

Virtual reality (VR) in neurorehabilitation has emerged as a fairly recent approach that shows great promise to enhance the integration of virtual limbs in one`s body scheme [1] and motor learning in general [2]. Virtual Rehabilitation is a “group [of] all forms of clinical intervention (physical, occupational, cognitive, or psychological) that are based on, or augmented by, the use of Virtual Reality, augmented reality and computing technology. The term applies equally to interventions done locally, or at a distance (tele-rehabilitation)” [3]. The main objectives of intervention for facilitating motor learning within this definition are to (1) provide repetitive and customized high intensity training, (2) relay back information on patients’ performance via multimodal feedback, and (3) improve motivation [24]. VR therapies or interventions are based on real-time motion tracking and computer graphic technologies displaying the patients’ behaviour during a task in a virtual environment.

The interaction of the user and Virtual environment can be described as a perception and action loop [5]. This motor performance is displayed in the virtual environment and subsequently, the system provides multimodal feedback related to movement execution. Through external (e.g. vision) and internal (proprioception) senses the on-line sensory feedback is integrated into the patient’s mental representation. If necessary, the motor plan is corrected in order to achieve the given goal [5].

A previous Cochrane Review from Laver, George, Thomas, Deutsch, and Crotty [2] on Virtual Reality for stroke rehabilitation showed positive effects of VR intervention for motor rehabilitation in people post-stroke. However, grouped analysis from this review on recommendation for VR intervention provides inconclusive evidence. The author further comments that “[…] virtual reality interventions may vary greatly […], it is unclear what characteristics of the intervention are most important” ([2], p. 14).

Virtual rehabilitation system provides three different types of information to the patient: movement visualisation, performance feedback and context information [6]. During a motor task the patient’s movements are captured and represented in the virtual environment (movement visualisation). According to the task success, information about the accomplished goal or a required movement alteration is transmitted through one or several sensory modalities (performance feedback). Finally, these two VR features are embedded in a virtual world (context information) that can vary from a very realistic to an abstract, unrealistic or reduced, technical environment.

Performance feedback often relies on theories of motor learning and is probably the most studied information type within VR-based motor rehabilitation. Moreover, context information is primarily not designed with a therapeutic purpose. Movement observation, however, plays an important role for central sensory stimulation therapies, such as mirror therapy or mental training. The observation or imagination of body movements facilitates motor recovery [789] and provides new possibilities for cortical reorganization and enhancement of functional mobility. Thus, it appears that movement visualisation may also play an important role in motor rehabilitation [101112], although this aspect is yet to be systematically investigated [13].

The main goal of the present review is to identify various movement visualisation groups in VR-based motor interventions for lower extremities, by means of a systematic literature search. Secondarily, the included studies are further analysed for their effect on motor learning. This will help guide future research in rehabilitation using VR.

An interim analysis of the review published in 2013 showed six MV groups for upper and lower extremity training and additional two MV groups directed only towards lower extremity training. In this paper, we analysed only studies involving lower limb training, leading to a revision and expansion of the previously published MV groups findings [131415].

Continue —> Movement visualisation in virtual reality rehabilitation of the lower limb: a systematic review | BioMedical Engineering OnLine | Full Text

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[ARTICLE] Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Does Not Affect Lower Extremity Muscle Strength Training in Healthy Individuals: A Triple-Blind, Sham-Controlled Study – Full Text

The present study investigated the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on lower extremity muscle strength training in 24 healthy participants. In this triple-blind, sham-controlled study, participants were randomly allocated to the anodal tDCS plus muscle strength training (anodal tDCS) group or sham tDCS plus muscle strength training (sham tDCS) group. Anodal tDCS (2 mA) was applied to the primary motor cortex of the lower extremity during muscle strength training of the knee extensors and flexors. Training was conducted once every 3 days for 3 weeks (7 sessions). Knee extensor and flexor peak torques were evaluated before and after the 3 weeks of training. After the 3-week intervention, peak torques of knee extension and flexion changed from 155.9 to 191.1 Nm and from 81.5 to 93.1 Nm in the anodal tDCS group. Peak torques changed from 164.1 to 194.8 Nm on extension and from 78.0 to 85.6 Nm on flexion in the sham tDCS group. In both groups, peak torques of knee extension and flexion significantly increased after the intervention, with no significant difference between the anodal tDCS and sham tDCS groups. In conclusion, although the administration of eccentric training increased knee extensor and flexor peak torques, anodal tDCS did not enhance the effects of lower extremity muscle strength training in healthy individuals. The present null results have crucial implications for selecting optimal stimulation parameters for clinical trials.

Introduction

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive cortical stimulation procedure in which weak direct currents polarize target brain regions (Nitsche and Paulus, 2000). The application of anodal tDCS to the primary motor cortex of the lower extremity transiently increases corticospinal excitability in healthy individuals (Jeffery et al., 2007Tatemoto et al., 2013) and improves motor function in healthy individuals and patients with stroke (Tanaka et al., 20092011Madhavan et al., 2011Sriraman et al., 2014Chang et al., 2015Montenegro et al., 20152016Angius et al., 2016Washabaugh et al., 2016). Thus, anodal tDCS has a potential to become a new adjunct therapeutic strategy for the rehabilitation of leg motor function and locomotion following a stroke.

Lower leg muscle strength is an important motor function required for patients who have had a stroke to regain activities of daily living (ADL). Lower leg muscle strength correlates with performance in activities, including sit-to-stand, gait, and stair ascent (Bohannon, 2007). Furthermore, lower leg muscle strength training increases muscle strength and improves ADL in patients with stroke (Ada et al., 2006). Therefore, lower leg muscle strength training is one of the important activities rehabilitating patients with stroke to regain their independence in ADL.

Several studies have examined the effect of a single session of tDCS on lower leg muscle strength, although the evidence is inconsistent (Tanaka et al., 20092011Montenegro et al., 20152016Angius et al., 2016Washabaugh et al., 2016). Its effects seem dependent on tDCS protocols, training tasks, muscle groups, and subject populations. Although, most tDCS studies on lower leg muscle strength have focused on the acute effects of a single tDCS application, to the best of our knowledge, no study has examined how lower extremity strength training combined with repeated sessions of tDCS affects lower leg muscle strength. This type of investigation has strong clinical implications for the application of tDCS in rehabilitation for patients with lower leg muscle weakness.

Thus, to examine whether anodal tDCS can enhance the effects of lower extremity muscle strength training, the present study simultaneously applied anodal tDCS and lower extremity muscle strength training to healthy individuals and evaluated their effects on lower extremity muscle strength.

Continue —> Frontiers | Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Does Not Affect Lower Extremity Muscle Strength Training in Healthy Individuals: A Triple-Blind, Sham-Controlled Study | Perception Science

Figure 1. Experimental setup of the muscle strength training and torque assessment.

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[VIDEO] Functional electrical stimulation (FES) talk with Christine Singleton and Sarah Joiner – YouTube

Δημοσιεύτηκε στις 22 Μαρ 2017

Lead Clinical Physiotherapist Christine Singleton and Sarah Joiner who has MS discuss Functional electrical stimulation (FES), how it works, who can use it, how to wear it, does it make a difference and how can you get referred for it. For more information about FES visit our website https://www.mstrust.org.uk/a-z/functi…

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[Abstract] Virtual Reality to Assess and Treat Lower Extremity Disorders in Post-stroke Patients

Abstract
Introduction: This article is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on “Methodologies, Models and Algorithms for Patients Rehabilitation”.
Objectives: To identify support of a virtual reality system in the kinematic assessment and physiotherapy approach to gait disorders in individuals with stroke.
Methods: We adapt Virtual Reality Rehabilitation System (VRRS), software widely used in the functional recovery of the upper limb, for its use on the lower limb of hemiplegic patients. Clinical scales have been used to relate them with the kinematic assessment provided by the system. A description of the use of reinforced feedback provided by the system on the recovery of deficits in several real cases in the field of physiotherapy is performed. Specific examples of functional tasks have been detailed, to be considered in creating intelligent health technologies to improve post-stroke gait.
Results: Both participants improved scores on the clinical scales, the kinematic parameters in leg stance on plegic lower extremity and walking speed > Minimally Clinically Important Difference (MCID).
Conclusion: The use of the VRRS software attached to a motion tracking capture system showed their practical utility and safety in enriching physiotherapeutic assessment and treatment in post-stroke gait disorders.

Source: Virtual Reality to Assess and Treat Lower Extremity Disorders in Post-stroke Patients

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[WEB SITE] Restorative Therapies to Showcase Xcite FES System at APTA Combined Sections Meeting in San Antonio, TX February.


Restorative Therapies, Inc, the leader in FES powered systems, announced today that it will be exhibiting the new Xcite FES system at APTA’s Combined Sections Meeting taking place at the Henry B. González Convention Center in San Antonio, TX over February 15 to 18, 2017.

Restorative Therapies will be featuring live demonstrations of their new Xcite FES system, and experts will be on hand at booth number 442 to discuss the clinical applications.

Xcite FES Clinical Station is a portable, multi-channel FES therapy system. Easy to use pre-programmed activity libraries for upper extremity, lower extremity and general activities deliver sequenced stimulation enabling a patient’s weak or paralyzed muscles to move through dynamic movement patterns. Xcite assists patients to perform task specific, strengthening and gross motor activities using up to 12 channels of stimulation.

The on screen photo guide for electrode placement facilitates easy set up. An avatar demonstrates each activity and there are chimes to indicate transitions providing visual and auditory cues that assist your patient with timing and awareness of movements.

“Repetitive practice of task specific, strengthening and gross motor activities have long been a cornerstone of PT and OT programs for patients with neurological impairments or muscle weakness,” says Wendy Warfield, MSHA, OTR/L, Clinical Education Manager of Restorative Therapies. “Xcite is designed to be easily integrated into these traditional programs. Xcite enhances the impact of the traditional therapeutic activities that support neuromuscular reeducation.”

“There is nothing else on the market that compares to Xcite…It is great to finally have a device that allows you to work on precise motor control and dexterity while providing FES…Xcite’s ability to control each movement channel individually allows you to facilitate more accurate and functional movement patterns for greater recovery,” said Jenny Suggit, MS OTR/L, CLT, Occupational Therapist, Centre Manager, Neurokinex-Gatwick, UK.

Also on display will be RT300 supine. RT300 supine allows people to leg or arm cycle while in bed. Cycling from bed can be an important component in an Early Mobility program. Early Mobility programs are being adopted by a growing number of Intensive Care Units with the goal of enhancing patient outcomes and reducing lengths of stay.

About Restorative Therapies
Restorative Therapies mission is to help people with a neurological impairment or in critical care achieve their full recovery potential. Restorative Therapies is one of the first companies to target activity-based physical therapy and Functional Electrical Stimulation as a rehabilitation therapy for immobility associated with paralysis such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury or for patients in critical care.

Restorative Therapies is a privately held company headquartered in Baltimore. To learn more about Restorative Therapies please visit us at http://www.restorative-therapies.com

There is nothing else on the market that compares to Xcite…It is great to finally have a device that allows you to work on precise motor control and dexterity while providing FES

 

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[Literature Overview] EBRSR – 9 Mobility and the Lower Extremity – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Rehabilitation techniques of sensorimotor complications post stroke fall loosely into one of two categories; the compensatory approach or the restorative approach. While some overlap exists, the underlying philosophies of care are what set them apart. The goal of the compensatory approach towards treatment is not necessarily on improving motor recovery or reducing impairments but rather on teaching patients a new skill, even if it only involves pragmatically using the non-involved side (Gresham et al. 1995). The restorative approach focuses on traditional physical therapy exercises and neuromuscular facilitation, which involves sensorimotor stimulation, exercises and resistance training, designed to enhance motor recovery and maximize brain recovery of the neurological impairment (Gresham et al. 1995).In this review, rehabilitation of mobility and lower extremity complications is assessed. An overview of literature pertaining to the compensatory approach and the restorative approach is provided. Treatment targets discussed include balance retraining, gait retraining, strength training, cardiovascular conditioning and treatment of contractures in the lower extremities. Technologies used to aid rehabilitation include assistive devices, electrical stimulation, and splints.

Full Text PDF (175 pages)

 

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[Stroke Rehabilitation Clinician Handbook] 4. Motor Rehabilitation – 4A. Lower Extremity and Mobility – Full Text PDF

4.1 Motor Recovery of the Lower Extremity Post Stroke

Factors that Predict Motor Recovery

Motor deficits post-stroke are the most obvious impairment (Langhorne et al. 2012) and have a disabling impact on valued activities and independence. Motor deficits are defined as “a loss or limitation of function in muscle control or movement or a limitation of movement” (Langhorne et al. 2012; Wade 1992). Given its importance, a large proportion of stroke rehabilitation efforts are directed towards the recovery of movement disorders. Langhorne et al. (2012) notes that motor recovery after stroke is complex with many treatments designed to promote recovery of motor impairment and function.

The two most important factors which predict motor recovery are:

  1. Stroke Severity: The most important predictive factor which reduces the capacity for brain reorganization.
  2. Age: Younger patients demonstrate greater neurological and functional recovery and hence have a better prognosis compared to older stroke patients (Adunsky et al. 1992; Hindfelt & Nilsson 1977; Marini et al. 2001; Nedeltchev et al. 2005).

Changes in walking ability and gait pattern often persist long-term and include increased tone, gait asymmetry, changes in muscle activation and reduced functional abilities (Wooley 2001; Robbins et al. 2006; Pizzi et al. 2007, Pereira et al. 2012). Ambulation post stroke is often less efficient and associated with increased energy expenditure (Pereira et al. 2012). Hemiplegic individuals have been reported to utilize 50-67% more metabolic energy that normal individuals when walking at the same velocity (Wooley et al. 2001).

For mobility outcome, trunk balance is an additional predictor of recovery (Veerbeek et al. 2011). Nonambulant patients who regained sitting balance and some voluntary movement of the hip, knee and/or ankle within the first 72 hours post stroke predicted 98% chance of regaining independent gait within 6 months. In contrast, those who were unable to sit independently for 30 seconds and could not contract the paretic lower limb within the first 72 hours post stroke had a 27% probability of achieving independent gait.

Full Text PDF

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[WEB SITE] Getting Neuro Patients Back On Their Feet

Published on January 17, 2017

Body weight support devices are available for use over a treadmill or overground. Patients who use these devices are often less fearful and more motivated knowing they are safely supported and not at risk of falling.

By Jessica Finnegan, PT, MPT, NCS

This is an exciting time in the world of neurologic physical therapy. Rehabilitation technologies are emerging and research is ongoing to determine the efficacy of these products. In the current healthcare environment, rehabilitation stays are becoming shorter and physical therapists (PTs) must find a way to prioritize which interventions will be most beneficial to their patients. This article discusses several rehabilitation technologies with the hope of helping PTs integrate them into their plans of care to improve mobility in patients recovering from stroke and other neurological disorders.

Convenience, Safety, and Early Mobility

Intensive, repetitive mobility-task training is recommended for all patients with impaired gait after stroke.1 In the past, mobilizing a patient with dense hemiparesis may have required two to three skilled therapists. This has obvious implications for staff efficiency and productivity. In addition, musculoskeletal injuries are commonly reported by healthcare providers and are often associated with manual patient handling.2 Workplace injuries can be a threat to the health and careers of PTs and should be avoided. Darragh and colleagues explored physical and occupational therapists’ experience with safe-patient-handling (SPH) equipment, such as ceiling lifts, floor lifts, and more. This equipment is becoming more widely available, allowing early mobilization of patients with fewer skilled staff members present and reduced risk of injury to the therapist. In this study, therapeutic uses of SPH equipment included transfer training, functional ambulation, and bed mobility.

Therapists also reported using SPH devices to address impaired attention, visual perception, and neglect. Overall, therapists who used SPH equipment “experienced increased options in therapy, accomplished more, and mobilized patients earlier in their recovery.” They also remarked that they needed to co-treat or solicit help from other professionals less frequently, which should improve productivity overall.3…

Recent technologies have entered the market that enable therapists to evaluate and train visual acuity and cognitive processing as part of rehab programs. These devices can target stroke, TBI, and neurocognitive conditions.

more —> Getting Neuro Patients Back On Their Feet – Physical Therapy Products

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[VIDEO] Upper & Lower limb rehabilitation using MediTouch system – YouTube

Upper & Lower limb rehabilitation using MediTouch system – YouTube

Published on Apr 18, 2016

MediTouch creates innovative physical rehabilitation solutions for hospital, community clinic and home care use. The unique patented products utilize wearable motion capture devices and dedicated rehabilitation software that allows patients with upper and lower extremity movement dysfunction to undertake intensive practice of single and multi-joints using movement biofeedback.

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[Abstract] Effect of Underwater Exercise on Lower-Extremity Function and Quality of Life in Post-Stroke Patients: A Pilot Controlled Clinical Trial. – PubMed

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To date, controlled clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of underwater exercise in improving the lower-extremity function and quality of life (QOL) in post-stroke patients have yet to be conducted. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether repeated underwater exercise enhances the therapeutic effect of conventional therapy for post-stroke patients.

DESIGN:

This was a pilot controlled clinical trial.

SETTING:

The study took place in a research facility attached to a rehabilitation hospital.

PATIENTS:

This prospective trial included 120 consecutive post-stroke inpatients with hemiplegic lower limbs (Brunnstrom stage 3-6). Patients were assigned to either an experimental or a control group. Patients in the experimental group received both repeated underwater exercise and conventional rehabilitation therapy.

INTERVENTIONS:

The underwater exercise consisted of 30-min training sessions in a pool with a water temperature of 30-31°C in which patients followed the directions and movements of trained staff. Training sessions were conducted once a day on 2 days of the week for a total of 24 times. Patients in the control group received only the conventional therapy.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

The 10-Minute Walk Test (10MWT), the Modified Ashworth Scale, and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey were the outcome measures used. Lower-extremity function and QOL were assessed before and upon completion of the 12-week program.

RESULTS:

Improvements in 10MWT results and spasticity parameters were greater in the experimental group than they were in the control group (p < 0.01). Significant differences between the groups were observed in magnitudes of changes of all QOL parameters (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Combining conventional therapy with repeated underwater exercise may improve both lower-extremity function and QOL in post-stroke patients.

Source: Effect of Underwater Exercise on Lower-Extremity Function and Quality of Life in Post-Stroke Patients: A Pilot Controlled Clinical Trial. – PubMed – NCBI

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