Posts Tagged IPhone

[WEB SITE] 10 of the best apps for stroke recovery in 2018

Following a stroke, the body needs time to heal, and recovery time depends on the symptoms and severity of the stroke. We have identified the best apps to help stroke survivors with their recovery and rehabilitation.
older man looking at phone

Smartphone apps can assist with stroke recovery and rehabilitation.

More than 795,000 individuals in the United States have a stroke each year, and around 140,000 of these people die from stroke.

Ischemic strokes — wherein “blood flow to the brain is blocked” — account for roughly 87 percent of all strokes.

Stroke can cause significant injury to the brain that may result in many long-term problems.

For example, communication, concentration, memory, and executive function, as well as spatial awareness, are all cognitive functions that may be impacted by stroke.

Stroke can also trigger mental health issues such as anxiety and depression, as well as movement and coordination problems, paralysis, difficulties swallowing, visual impairment, and urinary incontinence and loss of bowel control.

The faster a person is treated after stroke, the more likely they are to recover from it. Surveys have shown that people who “arrived at the emergency room within 3 hours” of their first symptoms of stroke had “less disability” 3 months later than those who were treated later.

While some people recover quickly from stroke, others may need long-term support. Apps are available to help aid the stroke recovery process. They can help you or your loved one to track appointments and medications, provide language therapy, train the brain, and even lower some risk factors for future strokes.

Medical News Today have selected the top 10 apps to assist with stroke recovery.

Cozi

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Cozi logo

Cozi is a family organizer designed to keep track of multiple schedules. The app can help caregivers to manage their schedules and is ideal if the person recovering from a stroke has several caregivers.

Keep track of schedules with a shared color-coded calendar and set reminders for yourself or other family members so that medical appointments and medications are not missed.

Shopping and to-do lists can also be shared with everyone in the family to ensure that you have everything you need from the grocery store. All items added to lists are viewable instantly in real-time.

Medisafe

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Medisafe logo

Medisafe is the must-have pill reminder that makes sure that you never miss a dose of your medication or mistakenly double up due to not tracking your medications ever again.

According to the app, mistakes with medicine use and dosage tracking result in 50 percent of individuals not taking medication as prescribed, 700,000 hospital visits, 125,000 deaths each year, and 44 in every 100 prescriptions not being collected from the pharmacy.

Whether you are taking one drug dose or multiple doses each day, it can be challenging to remember to take the right pill at the right time. Medisafe takes the stress out of having to remember if you or your loved one took their medications correctly.

Stop, Breathe & Think

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Stop, Breathe & Think logo

Research has shown that increased activity in a brain region called the amygdala, which is involved in stress, is tied to a greater risk of stroke. Therefore, reducing stress while in recovery from stroke could reduce the risk of future strokes.

Stop, Breathe & Think is a meditation and mindfulness app that helps to decrease stress and anxiety. The app provides guided meditations, breathing exercises, and yoga and acupressure videos to help you check in with your emotions.

Stop, Breathe & Think says that taking a few minutes every day to feel calm is just as important as getting frequent exercise and will reduce stress and promote peace of mind.

7 Minute Workout Challenge

Android: $2.99

iPhone: $2.99

7 Minute Workout Challenge logo

Working out three to five times per week reduces the likelihood of recurrent stroke by fivefold, according to a study published in the journal Neurology.

If you are unsure of how to start an exercise routine after stroke, the 7 Minute Workout Challenge app could be the perfect app for you. The 7-minute workout is a research-backed exercise program that has become a hit internationally.

Scientists have put together 12 exercises to perform for 30 seconds each with a rest period of 10 seconds in-between. The exercise sequences are easy to do, require no equipment, and can be done anywhere.

Language Therapy 4-in-1

Android: $59.99

iPhone: $59.99

Language Therapy logo

After stroke, it is common to experience a condition called aphasia, which affects your ability to understand what people are saying, find the right words, and read and write. Aphasia is often a symptom of the brain damage caused by stroke.

Language Therapy 4-in-1 is a scientifically proven speech therapy app that aims to improve speaking, listening, reading, and writing in those with aphasia. Get started by giving their free version, Language Therapy Lite, a try today.

Research led by the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom found that using the app for 20 minutes each day for 4 weeks showed improvements in all study participants with chronic aphasia.

Constant Therapy

Android: Free trial

iPhone: Free trial

Constant Therapy logo

Constant Therapy is a cognitive and speech therapy app designed for individuals who are recovering from stroke, brain injury, and aphasia. The app is free for 15 days and then offers users the chance to continue with a monthly or annual subscription.

With more than 65 task categories, 100,000 exercises, and 10 levels of difficulty, Constant Therapy can help to improve cognition, memory, speech, language, reading, and comprehension skills.

Constant Therapy was developed by scientists at Boston University in Massachusetts and is recommended by neurologists, speech language pathologists, and occupational therapists. Research published in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience showed a significant improvement in standardized tests for stroke survivors after using Constant Therapy.

VocalEyes AI

iPhone: Free

VocalEyes logo

Stroke can sometimes cause damage to brain areas that receive, process, and interpret information sent from the eyes. This damage may result in losing part of your field of vision or causing double vision.

VocalEyes is computer vision for the visually impaired. The app uses machine learning to help people with vision problems identify objects in their everyday lives. Take a photo, and the app will tell you what the camera sees.

VocalEyes’s audio response describes scenes and environments, identifies objects, label logos, and brands, reads text, detects faces, classifies emotions, recognizes ages, and distinguishes currency denominations.

Glasses

iPhone: Free

Glasses logo

Glasses is a digital magnifier and mirror that can help you to view fine print and objects with up to 12x magnification.

If your vision is impaired after stroke or you have simply forgotten your glasses, the app can zoom in on labels and nutritional information in a grocery store and menus in dark restaurants as well as help you see how much to pay on the bill after eating out.

Glasses is simple to use. Double tapping quickly zooms in or out by 6x, while swiping uses a slow and continuous zoom method. If you have shaky hands, you can tap and hold to freeze the image on screen.

Elevate

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Elevate logo

If you are experiencing cognitive function problems after stroke, brain-training apps provide a platform to exercise and improve the areas of the brain involved in concentration, memory, planning, reason, and problem-solving.

Elevate is a brain-training app that is designed to enhance speaking abilities, processing speed, focus, and memory. Elevate provides a personalized training program that adapts in difficulty over time to ensure you are always challenged.

Elevate features more than 40 games aimed at improving your skills, plus a workout calendar that tracks your streaks to keep you motivated. Users who train with Elevate at least three times each week have reported considerable gains in abilities and increased confidence.

Peak

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Peak logo

The Peak app includes 40 unique brain-training games developed by neuroscientists to challenge and build your cognitive skills.

Peak features a personal brain trainer, known as Coach, who selects the perfect workouts for you at the correct time. Choose your training exercises from Coach’s recommendations to challenge yourself and stay motivated by tracking your progress with in-depth insights.

Free games challenge your attention, memory, problem-solving skills, mental agility, coordination, emotional control, language, and creativity. Upgrade to Pro for additional features.

via 10 of the best apps for stroke recovery in 2018

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[WEB SITE] The 10 best epilepsy apps – Medical News Today

Epilepsy apps help you to log your symptoms and potential triggers for seizures, as well as their duration and severity.

Living with epilepsy is more than just knowing your seizure types, the right medication, and dosage. Apps designed for tackling epilepsy can help you to take a practical approach to your seizures and manage how the condition affects your social, emotional, and physical well-being.

Epilepsy is a neurological condition affecting an estimted 3.4 million individuals in the United States. The main symptom of epilepsy is repeated seizures, which affect everyone differently depending on the part of the brain that is involved.

While some people have seizures that cause the body to jerk and shake, others experience unusual sensations or loss of consciousness. Most seizures occur randomly, but stresssleep deprivation, alcohol, certain medications, specific foods, and flashing bright lights can also trigger them.

You may find that your seizures have a pattern or are more likely to occur in certain situations. It can be useful to record your symptoms and seizures in an epilepsy tracking app or journal, and share the information with a healthcare profession or epilepsy specialist.

Here are Medical News Today‘s choices of the 10 best epilepsy apps.

HealthUnlocked

iPhone: Free

HealthUnlocked logo

HealthUnlocked is a health-based social network. With more than 600 communities, HealthUnlocked matches you with other people that are interested in similar health-related topics or are in the same health situation.

On sign-up, you can add your health conditions, including epilepsy, and choose other subjects that interest you. These can be altered at any time. By searching communities using keywords such as “epilepsy” and “seizures,” groups are suggested that are relevant for you to join.

Becoming a member of a community allows you to post questions, learn from the experience of others, and receive emotional support. The app also recommends communities, content, people to connect with, and services.

Seizure Tracker

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Seizure Tracker logo

Seizure Tracker is quick and easy to set up on your smartphone and can be used immediately after download. The app is designed to help you to manage epilepsy by logging seizures and keeping records of their length, type, potential triggers, and a description of associated symptoms.

Created by the parents of a child with epilepsy, Seizure Tracker’s goal is to empower those with epilepsy while redefining how information about the condition and seizures is collected and shared.

The app’s Quick Capture button allows you to time and record seizures as they happen and upload them to YouTube for private sharing. When the video and timer are stopped, the app enters an event log that is stored in your Seizure Library. The app can also be used without the video function.

Seizure First Aide

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Seizure First Aide logo

Seizure First Aide is an app developed by the Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota that could save a life. One in 10 individuals in the U.S will have a seizure in their lifetime, according to the Foundation, and Seizure First Aide provides basic real-time first aid for anyone who observes a seizure happening – whatever the seizure type.

The First Aid icon on the dashboard gives you the four vital steps you need to follow if you encounter a seizure. You can also record the duration of the seizure with the Timer icon.

Videos are included in the app that show the five most common types of seizure to help you to identify what seizure type you have witnessed, and a Get Help emergency icon is included that recommends you call 911 if a seizure lasts more than 5 minutes.

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Snug Safety

iPhone: Free

Snug Safety logo

Snug Safety is a daily check-in service that provides peace of mind for individuals that live alone. Snug Safety checks in with you every day, and if they do not receive a response from you, they will notify your emergency contacts and send for help.

If you live on your own and are worried about experiencing severe seizures, Snug Safety could be a useful solution. The makers say to think of the app as a modern medical alert that is designed to be positive, proactive, and friendly.

The free plan includes alerting emergency contacts if someone does not check in at their regular time, and an upgrade is available to a dispatch plan, wherein a personal dispatcher will call or coordinate a wellness check to the individual’s last known location.

ICE Medical Standard

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

ICE Medical Standard logo

Seizures can happen anywhere and at any time. ICE Medical Standard allows you to share key emergency information with a first responder on your phone’s lock screen. You can add the phone numbers of your emergency contacts, information about any medication that you take, any medical conditions that you have, and other essential information that could save vital time in an emergency situation.

The app guides you through entering the emergency information and then saves this as a lock screen image, meaning that a first responder only needs to power up your phone to see all the information they require. You can also set a color code based on your condition, with red indicating that you have a health condition such as epilepsy.

The app’s developers, About the Kids Foundation, advise that a smartphone is used as a backup in this type of situation, as it could lose power or otherwise be overlooked. They say that you should use an ICE Medical Standard ID Card, as well. However, this app could make all the difference in a medical emergency.

Epilepsy Journal

Android: Free

Epilepsy Journal logo

Epilepsy Journal is an app designed primarily for logging your seizures as they happen. The first thing you will notice when you install the app is the large purple button marked “Seizure,” which makes logging the start and end of a seizure simple.

You can also log rescue medication, possible triggers, the activity you were doing at the time of the seizure, and your location. From these entries, you can generate reports, view trends, and even email your doctor.

The app’s creator, Olly Tree Applications, say that the inspiration for the app was driven by the person’s experiences with their daughter, who has severe epilepsy. They developed the app to allow people with the condition to communicate their symptoms and possible triggers quickly.

myChildren’s

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

myChildrens logo

myChildren’s is an app from the Nationwide Children’s Hospital that allows parents to track and manage their child’s healthcare needs. Although the app allows for tracking a wide range of healthcare needs, such as regular medication, it has a specialized built-in epilepsy toolkit.

After entering your child’s details, you can elect to add the Epilepsy Toolkit, which takes you to a specialized add-on. The add-on allows you to record the details of seizures including their type, description, possible triggers, and date and time. It also contains a section where you can enter information about the emergency treatment that your child needs and a useful list of resources about the condition.

While the app is not specifically for managing epilepsy, it is a valuable tool for storing and accessing information about your child’s medical needs in one place.

Thank you for supporting Medical News Today

Neurology Now

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Neurology Now logo

Neurology Now is a journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Published on a bi-monthly basis, Neurology Now features the latest groundbreaking research and news in neurology diagnosis, treatment, and management.

In-depth perspectives and tips on living with neurological disorders, including epilepsy, are included in the publication, along with inspiring stories written by patients and caregivers.

Articles include answers from experts to common questions about a condition, a closer look at particular treatments, advice on managing the cost of care, tips on managing your neurological condition, and the most recent research and promising treatments.

Epilepsy Health Storylines

Android: Free

iPhone: Free

Epilepsy Health Storylines logo

Epilepsy Health Storylines is an app designed to be “more than just a seizure tracker.” The app provides a variety of tools aimed at helping you to manage your condition. Its comprehensive feature set includes recording symptoms, seizures, moods, and setting reminders for taking medication.

The symptom tracker is well designed with a lookup search to allow you to enter the symptoms that you often experience. These are then saved to your home screen, allowing fast entry of the severity of the symptom, the effect that it had on your day, and how your mood was at the time.

The Daily Vitals screen displays trends over time that you can show your doctor. Other tools include the medication tracker, which allows you to enter your specific medications from pre-populated lists with the times of day that you need to take them.

SeizAlarm

iPhone: 2-week free trial

SeizAlarm logo

SeizAlarm is an app for people with epilepsy and other seizure-related disorders to alert their emergency contacts manually if they think that they will need help soon, or automatically if a seizure-like motion is detected by an iPhone or Apple Watch.

The app monitors for abnormal repetitive motion or elevated heart rate and notifies your emergency contacts accordingly. If you plan on taking part in an activity that may trigger false seizure detection, you can disable this feature.

SeizAlarm has a help request feature that can be activated if you require immediate help, and logs are kept of your requests to retain for your records. When a help request is sent, your location is captured and sent on to your emergency contacts so that they can easily find you.

Source: The 10 best epilepsy apps

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 [WEB SITE] EpiWatch 

EpiWatch
CURE and Johns Hopkins have just launched an exciting opportunity for epilepsy patients to participate in the EpiWatch research study. Downloading EpiWatch for Apple Watch and iPhone can help patients manage epilepsy by tracking seizures, medications, and possible triggers and side effects. EpiWatch provides a dashboard allowing access to data that can be shared with a physician or caregivier, and can also send alerts to family members or caregivers to let them know when a user is tracking a seizure.
For more information about the EpiWatch study or to find out about your eligibility, please call Johns Hopkins at 443-287-3042.

Source: News from CURE: EpiWatch, NYCURE, Call for Proposals, Caregiver Survey, New CEO

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[WEB SITE] Apple ResearchKit’s New Clinical Trials: Autism, Epilepsy, Melanoma.

Apple launched ResearchKit, its iOS-based platform for clinical research, in March with an initial class of five trials focused on a range of health conditions. Nearly seven months later, the tech giant is welcoming three new trials focused on epilepsy, autism, and melanoma.

ResearchKit was designed to upend how medical research is done. Until now, researchers were mostly limited to who they could recruit based on geographic proximity. By moving a clinical trial onto a mobile device like the iPhone, it opens up a goldmine of data for researchers. Within days of the initial launch, the five studies had thousands of new participants with a diversity of location, background, age and health. That trend has continued, Apple said, helped by more efficient on-boarding via streamlined informed consent and the wealth of data collected by connected devices.

“Researchers have been able to get infinitely richer data sets than before,” said Bud Tribble, MD, PhD, vice president of software engineering at Apple. “Apple has helped accelerate medical research by creating a simple way for scientists to greatly expand the scope of their studies, and this is critical to helping researchers succeed.”

Apple doesn’t directly design the apps. That is all done by the academic and medical institutions running the studies. Instead, the company focuses on providing an open-source framework that’s specially designed for medical and health research. All of which takes advantage of the iPhone’s accelerometer, microphone, gyroscope and camera. One of the latest studies even builds in the Apple Watch.

Below are the three latest studies launching on ResearchKit and what they hope to achieve.

Continue —>  Apple ResearchKit’s New Clinical Trials: Autism, Epilepsy, Melanoma – Fortune

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[WEB SITE] Smartphones, Apps Prove Liberating For Those With Special Needs.

Ruben Morales, a 59-year-old retired engineer who is blind and lives in Silicon Valley, has used a specialized screen-reading program for years to write and run spreadsheets on his desktop computer.

But recently, he figuratively cut the cord to his desktop and joined the mobile revolution. Morales was visiting an area Veterans Affairs blind rehabilitation center, learning how to use an iPhone’s features for people with vision impairment.

“It’s pretty amazing,” Morales said, demonstrating how he can call up a song and play it with a few taps. “Whatever I can do on the computer I can basically do it on the iPhone. It has the same capability.”

The smartphone, a gadget designed for the sighted, has turned out to be a godsend for those who are blind and visually impaired, making them more independent than ever before.

With VoiceOver, the iPhone’s built-in gesture-based app that reads text on a touch-screen aloud, or Google Android’s TalkBack, users who are blind can access anything on their phones. The user activates apps with a few gestures — single finger to explore and find buttons, one-finger touch to identify things on the screen and double-tap to push the button after it’s located.

“It’s a learning curve, but you can learn to do every single thing on an iPhone that anyone else can do,” said Lee Huffman, editor of AccessWorld, published by the American Foundation for the Blind. “These devices are opening up a whole new world.”

It didn’t look like it would turn out that way at first.

“The blind community started getting really panicky” when smartphones and later, tablets, took off following the iPhone’s debut in 2007, researcher Joshua Miele, associate director of Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute in San Francisco, recalled. “Touch-screens were a real concern.

”But in 2009, Apple included VoiceOver in its mobile operating system, and followed up with the personal assistant Siri in 2011, launching a new world of mobility for the visually impaired. Google added TalkBack, a screen reader, to its Android operating system in 2009 and Google Now, a personal assistant, in 2012. Microsoft mobile has similar features.

“It’s made a huge difference, productivity-wise,” said Jennison Asuncion, accessibility leader at LinkedIn, who is blind. “I use my mobile phone probably even more than lot of people.”

Erin Lauridsen, 32, a trainer at the Independent Living Resource Center in San Francisco, has been blind since birth and grew up using expensive, clunky, single-purpose devices for doing coursework in school. “When the iPhone 3GS came out with VoiceOver built in it was a huge game-changer for me and a lot of other people,” she said.

She uses an app called BlindSquare for navigation; Money Reader to identify currency denominations; and Voice Dream Reader to assemble audio play lists of documents from many sources. She also uses Uber and a lot of other popular apps.

“I’m on an equal footing with what everyone else does — the Yelping, Facebooking and Twittering,” she said.

People who are visually impaired want to use their mobile phones like anyone else, said Astrid Weber, who researches user experience at Google, visiting people who are visually impaired in their homes to see what they need and how they use technology.

“Mobility is really important for them,” she said.

Google Now — the Android personal assistant — is popular with users with vision impairment, said Eve Andersson, manager of Google’s accessibility engineering. Her parents who are vision impaired use it all the time, she said. “They ask their phones questions, ask it to call me, ask it for directions and create reminders. They love being able to do that with their voice.

”For years there have been screen readers for desktop computers. OutSpoken, developed by Berkeley Systems in the late 1980s, was the first for the Mac, according to Smith-Kettlewell’s Miele, who worked for the company.

But while VoiceOver and TalkBack broke the tether to the desktop, third-party apps still have to be made accessible to people with disabilities.

There’s a legal issue too. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires websites and mobile applications to be accessible, said disability rights lawyer Lainey Feingold, although regulations are still being worked on by the U.S. Department of Justice.

Google announced Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities last year with a $20 million grant for technology innovators in the nonprofit community who work on technology to make people with disabilities more independent. “We’re actively looking for proposals,” said Brigitte Hoyer Gosselink of Google.org….

Continue —> Smartphones, Apps Prove Liberating For Those With Special Needs – Disability Scoop

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[WEB SITE] PT Journal Now Has an iOS App

There is now an iOS App for PT Journal.  An iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch will allow for easy access and online reading of the journal. If you are looking to read the articles before print, then this is the app for you!

You will need to be an APTA member or institutional member to access the journal to get full access. With an individual membership, you will need to login using an APTA membership and password.  If you are on a wireless network through your institution, the app will automatically recognize your institution’s membership. If you are not on their network, a institutional proxy can be requested.

After first opening the app, you will have the option of having it send you notifications. The next step allows you to download the entire article or change the settings regarding downloading the full issue. In the setting you change set the new issue to automatically download or turn it off. You can also set the storage limit at different levels or leave it unlimited.

The bottom of the app has the following tabs: issues, online first, podcast, archives, and more.  The online first section is where you will find future articles which have yet to be published in the paper version of the journal. The podcasts section also includes the Craikcasts, various speeches from symposiums, or lectures. The archives allows for searching of back issues. There is a “more” section which allows you to select your favorites or check the history of articles you have accessed.

Have no fear though, if you are not an Apple user other great Android apps also exist and can be found below.

Other pod casts

Source: PT Journal Now Has an iOS App

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[WEB SITE] Johns Hopkins taps Apple Watch, ResearchKit for upcoming epilepsy study with eye on seizure prediction

Seeking deeper insight into epileptic seizures and their effect on the human body, Johns Hopkins’ ResearchKit study will collect heart rate sensor and accelerometer data from Watch, gyroscope data from iPhone and dynamic user feedback to track a variety of biometric measurements during a seizure episode, according to a source familiar with the project. The iPhone and Watch apps, now in beta testing, are slated to go live on Sept. 18.While sensor readings are automated, like many current iPhone-based ResearchKit initiatives, other metrics are not so easily ascertained. Activating the test process and measuring lucidity, for example, require some form of direct user interaction, a steep demand considering the extremely stressful nature of a seizure event. To help participants complete individual sessions they are given physical cues to answer contextual onscreen survey questions via Watch’s Taptic Engine. Alternatively, a caregiver might be able to initiate the testing process if present, the person said.

Continue —> Johns Hopkins taps Apple Watch, ResearchKit for upcoming epilepsy study with eye on seizure prediction

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[Pinterest] Apps4OTs on Pinterest

Contexts of Participation: an interactive tool which promotes critical thinking around participation, developed by Rayya Ghul and Dr Ian Marsh, senior lecturers in Occupational Therapy in the Department of Allied Health Professions at Canterbury Christ Church University.#Apps4OTs

These are some of the apps that are available which may be suitable for OTs or service users. These apps are not endorsed by BAOT/COT – we aim to list as many as possible to make OTs aware of the options available. If you have used any of these apps, please do leave a comment to tell others what you thought!

Continue —>  #Apps4OTs on Pinterest | Apps, App and Apraxia.

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[WEB SITE] Neurosurgical apps for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad

FREE: Neurosurgical apps for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad

4.700 downloads – 1 week!

Only few days …
2) NeuroICU app http://goo.gl/B8PW3D
3) Anamnesis App http://goo.gl/7SNm53
4) SUS para concurso http://goo.gl/WUvTpy
5) NeuroExam http://goo.gl/5OA95V
6) Spine Injury  app http://goo.gl/sqrW1A

Neurosurgical apps for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

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[Free App] Epilepsia App on the App Store on iTunes

Description

The best treatment for epilepsy is the precise monitoring of the epileptic crises. Since the objective of the treatment is the control of the seizures. And its what the Epilepsy App offers to you. With that app its possible to register day and time of the seizures, the symptiPhone Screenshot 2oms that follows, remedies that you are taking and even alarm to remember the time to do it.

The information is saved on the cloud so you take chances losing your data. Making it possible to check your notes at any Apple® device connected to internet.

All of this turn the information at a condensed report to help your doctor identify with precision the root of the problem and prescribe the ideal treatment.

Functionality

✓ Seizures video record

✓ Registry of the medicine used

✓ Alarm to remember the medicine time

✓ Registry of seizures

✓ Synchronized data on cloud (except video)

✓ Seizure list

✓ Share the information with your doctor

more —> Epilepsia App on the App Store on iTunes.

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