Posts Tagged IPhone

[WEB SITE] Apple ResearchKit’s New Clinical Trials: Autism, Epilepsy, Melanoma.

Apple launched ResearchKit, its iOS-based platform for clinical research, in March with an initial class of five trials focused on a range of health conditions. Nearly seven months later, the tech giant is welcoming three new trials focused on epilepsy, autism, and melanoma.

ResearchKit was designed to upend how medical research is done. Until now, researchers were mostly limited to who they could recruit based on geographic proximity. By moving a clinical trial onto a mobile device like the iPhone, it opens up a goldmine of data for researchers. Within days of the initial launch, the five studies had thousands of new participants with a diversity of location, background, age and health. That trend has continued, Apple said, helped by more efficient on-boarding via streamlined informed consent and the wealth of data collected by connected devices.

“Researchers have been able to get infinitely richer data sets than before,” said Bud Tribble, MD, PhD, vice president of software engineering at Apple. “Apple has helped accelerate medical research by creating a simple way for scientists to greatly expand the scope of their studies, and this is critical to helping researchers succeed.”

Apple doesn’t directly design the apps. That is all done by the academic and medical institutions running the studies. Instead, the company focuses on providing an open-source framework that’s specially designed for medical and health research. All of which takes advantage of the iPhone’s accelerometer, microphone, gyroscope and camera. One of the latest studies even builds in the Apple Watch.

Below are the three latest studies launching on ResearchKit and what they hope to achieve.

Continue —>  Apple ResearchKit’s New Clinical Trials: Autism, Epilepsy, Melanoma – Fortune

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[WEB SITE] Smartphones, Apps Prove Liberating For Those With Special Needs.

Ruben Morales, a 59-year-old retired engineer who is blind and lives in Silicon Valley, has used a specialized screen-reading program for years to write and run spreadsheets on his desktop computer.

But recently, he figuratively cut the cord to his desktop and joined the mobile revolution. Morales was visiting an area Veterans Affairs blind rehabilitation center, learning how to use an iPhone’s features for people with vision impairment.

“It’s pretty amazing,” Morales said, demonstrating how he can call up a song and play it with a few taps. “Whatever I can do on the computer I can basically do it on the iPhone. It has the same capability.”

The smartphone, a gadget designed for the sighted, has turned out to be a godsend for those who are blind and visually impaired, making them more independent than ever before.

With VoiceOver, the iPhone’s built-in gesture-based app that reads text on a touch-screen aloud, or Google Android’s TalkBack, users who are blind can access anything on their phones. The user activates apps with a few gestures — single finger to explore and find buttons, one-finger touch to identify things on the screen and double-tap to push the button after it’s located.

“It’s a learning curve, but you can learn to do every single thing on an iPhone that anyone else can do,” said Lee Huffman, editor of AccessWorld, published by the American Foundation for the Blind. “These devices are opening up a whole new world.”

It didn’t look like it would turn out that way at first.

“The blind community started getting really panicky” when smartphones and later, tablets, took off following the iPhone’s debut in 2007, researcher Joshua Miele, associate director of Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute in San Francisco, recalled. “Touch-screens were a real concern.

”But in 2009, Apple included VoiceOver in its mobile operating system, and followed up with the personal assistant Siri in 2011, launching a new world of mobility for the visually impaired. Google added TalkBack, a screen reader, to its Android operating system in 2009 and Google Now, a personal assistant, in 2012. Microsoft mobile has similar features.

“It’s made a huge difference, productivity-wise,” said Jennison Asuncion, accessibility leader at LinkedIn, who is blind. “I use my mobile phone probably even more than lot of people.”

Erin Lauridsen, 32, a trainer at the Independent Living Resource Center in San Francisco, has been blind since birth and grew up using expensive, clunky, single-purpose devices for doing coursework in school. “When the iPhone 3GS came out with VoiceOver built in it was a huge game-changer for me and a lot of other people,” she said.

She uses an app called BlindSquare for navigation; Money Reader to identify currency denominations; and Voice Dream Reader to assemble audio play lists of documents from many sources. She also uses Uber and a lot of other popular apps.

“I’m on an equal footing with what everyone else does — the Yelping, Facebooking and Twittering,” she said.

People who are visually impaired want to use their mobile phones like anyone else, said Astrid Weber, who researches user experience at Google, visiting people who are visually impaired in their homes to see what they need and how they use technology.

“Mobility is really important for them,” she said.

Google Now — the Android personal assistant — is popular with users with vision impairment, said Eve Andersson, manager of Google’s accessibility engineering. Her parents who are vision impaired use it all the time, she said. “They ask their phones questions, ask it to call me, ask it for directions and create reminders. They love being able to do that with their voice.

”For years there have been screen readers for desktop computers. OutSpoken, developed by Berkeley Systems in the late 1980s, was the first for the Mac, according to Smith-Kettlewell’s Miele, who worked for the company.

But while VoiceOver and TalkBack broke the tether to the desktop, third-party apps still have to be made accessible to people with disabilities.

There’s a legal issue too. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires websites and mobile applications to be accessible, said disability rights lawyer Lainey Feingold, although regulations are still being worked on by the U.S. Department of Justice.

Google announced Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities last year with a $20 million grant for technology innovators in the nonprofit community who work on technology to make people with disabilities more independent. “We’re actively looking for proposals,” said Brigitte Hoyer Gosselink of Google.org….

Continue —> Smartphones, Apps Prove Liberating For Those With Special Needs – Disability Scoop

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[WEB SITE] PT Journal Now Has an iOS App

There is now an iOS App for PT Journal.  An iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch will allow for easy access and online reading of the journal. If you are looking to read the articles before print, then this is the app for you!

You will need to be an APTA member or institutional member to access the journal to get full access. With an individual membership, you will need to login using an APTA membership and password.  If you are on a wireless network through your institution, the app will automatically recognize your institution’s membership. If you are not on their network, a institutional proxy can be requested.

After first opening the app, you will have the option of having it send you notifications. The next step allows you to download the entire article or change the settings regarding downloading the full issue. In the setting you change set the new issue to automatically download or turn it off. You can also set the storage limit at different levels or leave it unlimited.

The bottom of the app has the following tabs: issues, online first, podcast, archives, and more.  The online first section is where you will find future articles which have yet to be published in the paper version of the journal. The podcasts section also includes the Craikcasts, various speeches from symposiums, or lectures. The archives allows for searching of back issues. There is a “more” section which allows you to select your favorites or check the history of articles you have accessed.

Have no fear though, if you are not an Apple user other great Android apps also exist and can be found below.

Other pod casts

Source: PT Journal Now Has an iOS App

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[WEB SITE] Johns Hopkins taps Apple Watch, ResearchKit for upcoming epilepsy study with eye on seizure prediction

Seeking deeper insight into epileptic seizures and their effect on the human body, Johns Hopkins’ ResearchKit study will collect heart rate sensor and accelerometer data from Watch, gyroscope data from iPhone and dynamic user feedback to track a variety of biometric measurements during a seizure episode, according to a source familiar with the project. The iPhone and Watch apps, now in beta testing, are slated to go live on Sept. 18.While sensor readings are automated, like many current iPhone-based ResearchKit initiatives, other metrics are not so easily ascertained. Activating the test process and measuring lucidity, for example, require some form of direct user interaction, a steep demand considering the extremely stressful nature of a seizure event. To help participants complete individual sessions they are given physical cues to answer contextual onscreen survey questions via Watch’s Taptic Engine. Alternatively, a caregiver might be able to initiate the testing process if present, the person said.

Continue —> Johns Hopkins taps Apple Watch, ResearchKit for upcoming epilepsy study with eye on seizure prediction

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[Pinterest] Apps4OTs on Pinterest

Contexts of Participation: an interactive tool which promotes critical thinking around participation, developed by Rayya Ghul and Dr Ian Marsh, senior lecturers in Occupational Therapy in the Department of Allied Health Professions at Canterbury Christ Church University.#Apps4OTs

These are some of the apps that are available which may be suitable for OTs or service users. These apps are not endorsed by BAOT/COT – we aim to list as many as possible to make OTs aware of the options available. If you have used any of these apps, please do leave a comment to tell others what you thought!

Continue —>  #Apps4OTs on Pinterest | Apps, App and Apraxia.

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[WEB SITE] Neurosurgical apps for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad

FREE: Neurosurgical apps for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad

4.700 downloads – 1 week!

Only few days …
2) NeuroICU app http://goo.gl/B8PW3D
3) Anamnesis App http://goo.gl/7SNm53
4) SUS para concurso http://goo.gl/WUvTpy
5) NeuroExam http://goo.gl/5OA95V
6) Spine Injury  app http://goo.gl/sqrW1A

Neurosurgical apps for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad.

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[Free App] Epilepsia App on the App Store on iTunes

Description

The best treatment for epilepsy is the precise monitoring of the epileptic crises. Since the objective of the treatment is the control of the seizures. And its what the Epilepsy App offers to you. With that app its possible to register day and time of the seizures, the symptiPhone Screenshot 2oms that follows, remedies that you are taking and even alarm to remember the time to do it.

The information is saved on the cloud so you take chances losing your data. Making it possible to check your notes at any Apple® device connected to internet.

All of this turn the information at a condensed report to help your doctor identify with precision the root of the problem and prescribe the ideal treatment.

Functionality

✓ Seizures video record

✓ Registry of the medicine used

✓ Alarm to remember the medicine time

✓ Registry of seizures

✓ Synchronized data on cloud (except video)

✓ Seizure list

✓ Share the information with your doctor

more —> Epilepsia App on the App Store on iTunes.

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[INFOGRAPHIC] Best Mobile Apps for Sensory Impairments

infographic for best mobile apps for sensory impairmentOur friend Michael from Home Healthcare Adaptations has done it again! This time, he has created an infographic that explains what sensory impairment is, tells us the difference between vision and hearing impairment, and lists some really great apps for both types of impairment and explains how they work. Look at the infographic below for more details (click twice to enlarge). The apps listed are either free or very nominally priced.

Best Mobile Apps for Sensory Impairment

What is sensory impairment?

Sensory impairment or disability, is when one of your senses; sight, hearing, smell, touch or taste, is no longer functioning normally.

A person does not have full loss of a sense to be sensory impaired.

95% of the information about the world around us comes from our vision and our hearing.

Vision Impairment vs. Hearing Impairment

285 million people are estimated to be visually impaired worldwide.

39 million people are completely blind.

More than 4 in 5 people living with blindness are aged 50+.

360 million people have moderate to profound hearing loss.

Current production of hearing aids meets less than 10% of global need.

Approximately 1 in 3 people aged 65+ are affected by disabling hearing loss.

Mobile Apps for Vision Impairment

App: Tap Tap See

What it does: Uses the device’s camera and VoiceOver functions to photograph objects and identify them out loud for the user.

Features: Double tapping the screen enables the user to photograph any 2D or 3D object at any angle and define the object within seconds.

The device’s VoiceOver function audibly identifies the object to the user.

Includes the ability to repeat the last image’s identification and save the image to the camera roll with the attached tag.

Allows the upload of identified images from the camera roll and can share identification via twitter, facebook, text or email.

Platforms: iOS and Android

Cost: New users are provided with 100 trial pictures to start. 4 subscription plans are available starting from $4.99+.

App: Be My Eyes

What it does: It connects blind people with volunteer helpers globally via live video chat.

A blind person requests assistance via the app.

The volunteer receives a notification for help and a live video connection is established.

Features:

Utilises the iPhone VoiceOver technology which enables synthetic speech and a touch based interface.

At the end of each session there is a ‘rate it’ or ‘report misuse’ option both for the helper and the user.

Platforms: iOS. Android version in production.

Cost: Free, but a  subscription may be put in place from September 2015.

more —> Assistive Technology Blog: INFOGRAPHIC: Best Mobile Apps for Sensory Impairments.

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[Apps] Neurosurgical apps for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad

FREE: Neurosurgical apps for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad
Only few days …
2) NeuroICU app http://goo.gl/B8PW3D
3) Anamnesis App http://goo.gl/7SNm53
4) SUS para concurso http://goo.gl/WUvTpy
6) Spine Injury  app http://goo.gl/sqrW1A
2_ENGLISH

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[WEB SITE] Help for Struggling Readers: FREE Literacy Apps for ALL Kinds of Struggling Readers

…So, we hope that you will take a minute or two to survey the list of FREE iPad and Android apps we have created here for struggling readers in your life. We also hope you will discover at least one of them that will offer your child or students the help needed to read with much more success Oh, yes, and don’t forget to check back here next week for that new product announcement! We think you’ll be glad you did!…

FREE Literacy Apps for Struggling Readers

via Help for Struggling Readers: FREE Literacy Apps for ALL Kinds of Struggling Readers.

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