Posts Tagged cerebral palsy

[Abstract] Neurotech: Robotic Assist Devices Show Gains in Walking for Crouch Gait in Cerebral Palsy and Post-Stroke Hemiparesis

via Neurotech: Robotic Assist Devices Show Gains in Walking for… : Neurology Today

ARTICLE IN BRIEF

Figure

Developers of robotic devices discuss advances in the technologies to help people improve walking post-stroke and improve couch gait in cerebral palsy. Independent experts in neurorehabilitation review the potential and possible caveats of these devices.

Three novel robotic assistance devices, one for hemiparetic gait following stroke, and two for crouch gait in children with cerebral palsy, have each demonstrated improved walking in preliminary clinical trials.

For stroke patients, a robotic exosuit made of a soft, clothing-like anchor attached to motorized cables was shown to increase the paretic limb’s forward propulsion and the paretic ankle’s swing phase dorsiflexion in both treadmill and over-ground walking.

For children with crouch gait due to cerebral palsy, one trial used a cable-driven robot called a Tethered Pelvic Assist Device, or TPAD. The laboratory-based device is designed to strengthen the extensor muscles, especially the soleus in the calves, by putting downward pressure on them during training. After six weeks of practice with the device, the children’s posture was more upright, with greater step length and toe clearance, when walking without it.

Also for children with crouch gait, the third study examined the use of a wearable exoskeleton that provides a burst of knee extension assistance at just the right moment when a child or adolescent is walking. None of the seven participants, age 5 to 17, fell while using it, and six of the seven showed postural improvements equivalent to those previously reported from surgery.

While promising, the devices will require far more testing in randomized trials before their true value can be known, said a leading specialist in neurological rehabilitation.

“These are foundational studies; they’re just beginning to get started,” said Bruce H. Dobkin, MD, FRCP, distinguished professor of clinical neurology and director of the Neurological Rehabilitation and Research Program at the Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. “The cost, safety, user-friendliness, and ability to use at differing levels of disability severity — all those are major challenges.”

Even so, each of the three devices employs a new kind of robotic assistance unlike any existing on the market.

“Most robotics for neurological injuries are heavy, power-hungry exosuits for people with spinal cord injuries who can’t walk at all,” said a coauthor of the study for stroke patients, Terry D. Ellis, PT, PhD, NCS, director of the Center for Neurorehabilitation at Boston University. “But there’s a whole bunch of people who have disabilities, who can walk, but don’t walk well. They need facilitation or augmentation to restore some of the normal components of walking.”

A ROBOT POST-STROKE

Published in the July 26 edition of Science Translational Medicine, the study of a robotic exosuit tested in nine post-stroke patients used what it called “garment-like, functional textile anchors” rather than a hard, metallic exterior. Worn on only the paretic limb, the suit was designed to be as unobtrusive as possible.

“It’s much more compatible with the real world than a rigid device would be,” said the first author of the paper, Louis N. Awad, PT, DPT, PhD, an assistant professor of physical therapy at Boston University, and a research faculty member at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital. “Ordinary clothes are made of soft material. We don’t don a metallic pair of pants and walk out the door. That’s our goal — robotic clothing that helps people with difficulty walking.”

Attached to cables tethered to a belt worn around the hips, the exosuit functioned in synchrony with a wearer’s paretic limb to facilitate an immediate increase in the paretic ankle’s swing phase dorsiflexion and forward propulsion (p< 0.05), according to the paper.

The improved movements resulted in a 20 percent reduction in forward propulsion interlimb asymmetry and a 10 percent reduction in the energy cost of walking, which together were equivalent to a nearly one-third lower metabolic burden — a 32 percent reduction — while walking.

Although the study did include some over-ground walking, it was not designed to test whether the exosuit had any therapeutic effects that might carry over to when patients are not wearing it.

“This is a proof of concept paper,” said Dr. Ellis. “Down the road we need to conduct trials in more ecologically valid environments, and to see if it has therapeutic value. For now we wanted to demonstrate that the device can facilitate more normal walking.”

While applauding the study as “clever,” Dr. Dobkin said it remained to be seen whether the robotic exosuit would prove to have significant therapeutic effects that would stand up in randomized trials in natural environments. He pointed to randomized trials published in recent years showing that peroneal nerve functional electrical stimulators have no greater therapeutic effect than do standard ankle-foot orthoses.

“It’s similar to all the work that was done using the electrical stimulation of the ankle,” Dr. Dobkin said. “The real question is whether it will lead to improved function when you walk over-ground. Walking on a treadmill is not terribly natural.”

He also pointed out that the nine patients in the study were able to walk on average at about two miles per hour. “That’s already pretty fast,” he said. In addition, he said, the 20 percent reduction in interlimb asymmetry is relatively modest.

But, said Dr. Dobkin, people can improve their gait by 20 percent just by sustained practice. “When you see modest changes like this with the device, you wonder if the same changes couldn’t have been achieved without it,” he said.

Steven L. Wolf, PhD, PT, FAPTA, FAHA, professor in the department of rehabilitation medicine at Emory University School of Medicine, pointed out that existing robotic devices to help people who are completely unable to walk can cost patients up to $250,000. Perhaps the exosuit might become an improvement over what presently exists both in terms of function and cost, he said.

“Most existing devices are beautiful but incredibly expensive,” Dr. Wolf said. “Is the bang in the buck? Not as yet, in my opinion. The evidence for persistent benefit from these device is just not there.”

IMPROVING CROUCH GAIT IN CP

The first of the two studies using robotic devices to improve crouch gait in children with cerebral palsy was published on July 26 in Science Robotics, led by senior author Sunil K. Agrawal, PhD, professor of mechanical engineering and rehabilitation medicine at Columbia University.

Rather than directly straighten the children’s posture, Dr. Agrawal’s seemingly contradictory approach was to increase the downward force on their pelvis as they attempted to walk on a treadmill. The tension in each wire, attached to a belt on the pelvis, is modulated in real time by a motor placed around the treadmill in response to motion capture data from cameras. Unlike other robotic devices that have been tested for treating crouch gait, the TPAD has no rigid links to the body, permitting free movement of the legs.

After training in the device for 15 sessions of 16 minutes each over the course of six weeks, the six participants showed enhanced upright posture, improved muscle coordination, increased step length, range of motion of the lower limb angles, toe clearance, and heel-to-toe pattern.

“You can see a marked difference before and after,” Dr. Agrawal said. “We heard from families and the children themselves that they were walking faster, with better posture. Now we have to see if we should use a higher magnitude of downward pull, how long each training session should be, and for how many sessions.”

Commenting on the TPAD study, Dr. Dobkin said, “The kids who were selected for inclusion were not necessarily the kind who get surgery. They had less of a crouch, a little bit more of a push-off. The question is whether training like this will lead to good over-ground walking. They got a hint of that.”

The second crouch-gait study, published on August 23 in Science Translational Medicine, involved a wearable exoskeleton designed for over-land use, and was described by the authors as the first robotic device designed specifically to treat a gait disorder in children and adolescents. Rather than force the lower limb to move in a particular way, “the exoskeleton dynamically changed the posture by introducing bursts of knee extension assistance during discrete portions of the walking cycle, a perturbation that resulted in maintained or increase knee extensor muscle activity during exoskeleton use,” the paper stated.

“In the last decade, there’s been a groundswell of work on exoskeletons, but a majority of them are designed to permit mobility after spinal injury in adults who have lost the ability to walk,” said senior author Thomas Bulea, PhD, a staff scientist in the functional and applied biomechanics section of the rehabilitation medicine department at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. “There hasn’t been much done for the pediatric population who just need to improve their walking.”

A coauthor of the paper, Diane L. Damiano, PT, PhD, chief of the section in which Dr. Bulea works, said the purpose of the wearable exoskeleton is different than that of the TPAD device developed by Dr. Agrawal.

“His device is designed to strengthen the calf muscles by increasing the resistance on them,” she said. “His results were good, but this is very different from what we are doing. We have a wearable device. It’s not meant to be used in a lab for training. We’re not necessarily trying to strengthen them, although that would be a desired outcome; we are instead trying to assist their abilities to help them practice being more upright while they walk. This is something that they would wear throughout the day for several months with the goal that their posture will ultimately be improved without the device.”

A surprising observation, she added, was that some children saw it as something cool to wear.

LINK UP FOR MORE INFORMATION:

•. Awad LN, Bae J, O’Donnell K, et al A soft robotic exosuit improves walking in patients after stroke http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/9/400/eaai9084. Sci Transl Med 2017; 9 (400). pii: eaai9084.

•. Video of the soft robotic exosuit for stroke patients: http://www.sciencetranslationalmedicine.org/cgi/content/full/9/400/eaai9084/DC1

•. Kang J, Martelli D, Vashista V, et al Robot-driven downward pelvic pull to improve crouch gait in children with cerebral palsy http://robotics.sciencemag.org/content/2/8/eaan2634. Sci Robot 2017;2(8): eaan2634.

•. Video of the robot-driven downward pelvic pull device can be seen at http://engineering.columbia.edu/news/sunil-agrawal-cerebral-palsy-crouch-gait

•. Lerner ZF, Damiano DL, Bulea TC. A lower-extremity exoskeleton improves knee extension in children with crouch gait from cerebral palsy http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/9/404/eaam9145. Sci Transl Med 2017; 9 (404). pii: eaam9145.
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[ARTICLE] Including a Lower-Extremity Component during Hand-Arm Bimanual Intensive Training does not Attenuate Improvements of the Upper Extremities: A Retrospective Study of Randomized Trials – Full Text

Hand-Arm Bimanual Intensive Therapy (HABIT) promotes hand function using intensive practice of bimanual functional and play tasks. This intervention has shown to be efficacious to improve upper-extremity (UE) function in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP). In addition to UE function deficits, lower-extremity (LE) function and UE–LE coordination are also impaired in children with USCP. Recently, a new intervention has been introduced in which the LE is simultaneously engaged during HABIT (Hand-Arm Bimanual Intensive Therapy Including Lower Extremities; HABIT-ILE). Positive effects of this therapy have been demonstrated for both the UE and LE function in children with USCP. However, it is unknown whether the addition of this constant LE component during a bimanual intensive therapy attenuates UE improvements observed in children with USCP. This retrospective study, based on multiple randomized protocols, aims to compare the UE function improvements in children with USCP after HABIT or HABIT-ILE. This study included 86 children with USCP who received 90 h of either HABIT (n = 42) or HABIT-ILE (n = 44) as participants in previous studies. Children were assessed before, after, and 4–6 months after intervention. Primary outcomes were the ABILHAND-Kids and the Assisting Hand Assessment. Secondary measures included the Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function, the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory [(PEDI); only the self-care functional ability domain] and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Data analysis was performed using two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with repeated measures on test sessions. Both groups showed similar, significant improvements for all tests (test session effect p < 0.001; group × test session interaction p > 0.05) except the PEDI and COPM. Larger improvements on these tests were found for the HABIT-ILE group (test session effect p < 0.001; group × test session interaction p < 0.05). These larger improvements may be explained by the constant simultaneous UE–LE engagement observed during the HABIT-ILE intervention since many daily living activities included in the PEDI and the COPM goals involve the LE and, more specifically, UE–LE coordination. We conclude that UE improvements in children with USCP are not attenuated by simultaneous UE–LE engagement during intensive intervention. In addition, systematic LE engagement during bimanual intensive intervention (HABIT-ILE) leads to larger functional improvements in activities of daily living involving the LE.

Introduction

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of pediatric motor disability with a prevalence ranging from 2 to 3.6 out of 1,000 children in western countries (12). Motor disorders are often accompanied by sensation, perception, cognition, behavior, communication, and epilepsy disorders (1). Although the lesions are established from birth and are non-progressive, the motor impairments experienced by children with CP affect their autonomy and functional outcomes during their life-span. Moreover, motor symptoms such as impaired ability to walk may worsen during development (3).

One of the most disabling long-term functional deficits in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP) is impaired manual dexterity, i.e., impaired skilled hand movements and precision grip abilities (4). Upper-extremity (UE) impairments may affect functional independence, especially for activities of daily living requiring bimanual coordination (e.g., buttoning one’s shirt). It is now well known that intensive interventions based on motor skill learning principles and goal-directed training are effective for improving UE function in children with USCP (5). Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) was the first intensive intervention adapted to children with USCP (6). CIMT was first designed for adults with stroke and subsequently adapted to children with USCP showing improvements in hand function (5). Taking advantage of the key ingredient of CIMT (intensive practice with the affected UE), Charles and Gordon developed an alternative intensive bimanual approach termed “Hand-Arm Bimanual Intensive Therapy” (HABIT) (7). HABIT was developed with recognition that the combined use of both hands was necessary to increase functional independence in children with USCP (7). Focusing on improving bimanual coordination through structured play and functional activities during HABIT demonstrated efficacy to improve UE function in children with USCP (5).

Both HABIT and CIMT focus only on the UE of children with USCP. Though the lower extremity (LE) is generally less affected than UE in children with USCP, impairments observed in the affected LE range from an isolated equine ankle to hip flexion and adduction with a fixed knee (8). Children with USCP are then unable to achieve postural symmetry while standing, systematically presenting with an overload on one bodyside (8). They also frequently encounter limitations in walking abilities (3). Besides the LE impairments, UE–LE coordination is often impaired in children with USCP (910). This coordination is frequently used in daily living activities (e.g., walking while carrying an object in the hand, climbing stairs while using the railing). A program that simultaneously trains the UE and LE in children with USCP is thus of interest since the UE impairments in children with CP remain stable through time (11) while walking and other LE abilities may decline during development (3). In 2014, taking advantage of the key ingredients in HABIT (intensive bimanual practice), Bleyenheuft and Gordon developed a new intervention focusing on both the UE and LE entitled “Hand-Arm Bimanual Intensive Therapy Including Lower Extremities” (HABIT-ILE) (12). Positive effects of this therapy focusing on both the UE and LE through structured play and functional activities have been demonstrated both for the UE and the LE of children with USCP (13) as well as, more recently, for children with bilateral CP (14). However, it is unknown whether the introduction of a systematic LE engagement in addition to a bimanual intervention may lead to attenuated improvements in UE compared to traditional HABIT due to shifts in attention (multitasking). This retrospective study aimed to compare changes in the UE of children with USCP undergoing 90 h of intensive bimanual intervention either with (HABIT-ILE) or without (HABIT) a LE component. We hypothesized that the introduction of systematic LE training simultaneously added to the bimanual training would lead to reduced improvements in the UE during HABIT-ILE compared to traditional HABIT. […]

Continue —> Frontiers | Including a Lower-Extremity Component during Hand-Arm Bimanual Intensive Training does not Attenuate Improvements of the Upper Extremities: A Retrospective Study of Randomized Trials | Neurology

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[ARTICLE] How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? – Full Text

Abstract:

Spastic paresis can arise from a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia. It is associated with muscle contracture, stiffness and pain, and can lead to segmental deformity. The positive, negative and biomechanical symptoms associated with spastic paresis can significantly affect patients’ quality of life, by affecting their ability to perform normal activities. This paper – based on the content of a global spasticity interdisciplinary masterclass presented by the authors for healthcare practitioners working in the field of spastic paresis – proposes a multidisciplinary approach to care involving not only healthcare practitioners, but also the patient and their family members/carers, and improvement of the transition between specialist care and community services. The suggested treatment pathway comprises assessment of the severity of spastic paresis, early access to neurorehabilitation and physiotherapy and treatment with botulinum toxin and new technologies, where appropriate. To address the challenge of maintaining patients’ motivation over the long term, tailored guided self-rehabilitation contracts can be used to set and monitor therapeutic goals. Current global consensus guidelines may have to be updated, to include a clinical care pathway related to the encompassing management of spastic paresis.

Spastic paresis may be caused by a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, retroviral and other infectious spinal cord disorders, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia.1 The exact prevalence of spastic paresis (in which spasticity is the most commonly recognised manifestation) is not known. However, it is estimated that around 30% of stroke survivors are affected by significant spasticity2 and 50% who present to hospital with stroke develop at least one severe contracture.3

Spastic paresis is a complex condition that may be associated with soft tissue contracture, pain and limitations of day-to-day activities, which have a substantial impact on patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life.4 Although treatment guidelines have been developed for (focal) spasticity,5 there remains a lack of consensus on key aspects of diagnosis, approaches to care and the care pathway that would help healthcare practitioners to more fully understand and manage this condition.

To address some of these limitations, a group of physicians and a physiotherapist with expertise in the management of spastic paresis developed a global spasticity masterclass for healthcare practitioners working in this field in order to share best practices and to discuss issues and current trends in the management of patients with spasticity. The outputs of this masterclass are presented here.

Continue —> How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? | Touch Neurology | Independent Insight for Medical Specialists

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[ARTICLE] How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? – Full Text HTML

Abstract:

Spastic paresis can arise from a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia. It is associated with muscle contracture, stiffness and pain, and can lead to segmental deformity. The positive, negative and biomechanical symptoms associated with spastic paresis can significantly affect patients’ quality of life, by affecting their ability to perform normal activities. This paper – based on the content of a global spasticity interdisciplinary masterclass presented by the authors for healthcare practitioners working in the field of spastic paresis – proposes a multidisciplinary approach to care involving not only healthcare practitioners, but also the patient and their family members/carers, and improvement of the transition between specialist care and community services. The suggested treatment pathway comprises assessment of the severity of spastic paresis, early access to neurorehabilitation and physiotherapy and treatment with botulinum toxin and new technologies, where appropriate. To address the challenge of maintaining patients’ motivation over the long term, tailored guided self-rehabilitation contracts can be used to set and monitor therapeutic goals. Current global consensus guidelines may have to be updated, to include a clinical care pathway related to the encompassing management of spastic paresis.

Spastic paresis may be caused by a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, retroviral and other infectious spinal cord disorders, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia.1 The exact prevalence of spastic paresis (in which spasticity is the most commonly recognised manifestation) is not known. However, it is estimated that around 30% of stroke survivors are affected by significant spasticity2 and 50% who present to hospital with stroke develop at least one severe contracture.3

Spastic paresis is a complex condition that may be associated with soft tissue contracture, pain and limitations of day-to-day activities, which have a substantial impact on patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life.4 Although treatment guidelines have been developed for (focal) spasticity,5 there remains a lack of consensus on key aspects of diagnosis, approaches to care and the care pathway that would help healthcare practitioners to more fully understand and manage this condition.

To address some of these limitations, a group of physicians and a physiotherapist with expertise in the management of spastic paresis developed a global spasticity masterclass for healthcare practitioners working in this field in order to share best practices and to discuss issues and current trends in the management of patients with spasticity. The outputs of this masterclass are presented here.

Pathophysiology and definitions
Spastic paresis
Spasticity is one of several components of spastic paresis, also known as the upper motor neuron (UMN) syndrome. Spastic paresis is primarily characterised by a quantitative lack of command directed to agonist muscles involved in performing movements.1,6,7 In addition, hyperactive spinal reflexes mediate some of the positive phenomena seen in spastic paresis, while other positive symptoms are related to disordered control of voluntary movement in terms of an abnormal efferent drive or are caused

Continue —> How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? | Touch Neurology | Independent Insight for Medical Specialists

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[WEB SITE] Overcome loss of Hand Function and Foot Drop. – Bioness FES – Inquiries

Regain Independence, Function, and Mobility.


Regain function with Bioness’ innovative solutions designed to help those living with Foot Drop or Hand Paralysis due to conditions such as Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, Cerebral Palsy, Traumatic Brain Injury, or Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury.
Visit Site —> Bioness FES | Inquiries

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[Review] How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? – Full Text PDF/HTML

Abstract

Spastic paresis can arise from a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia. It is associated with muscle contracture, stiffness and pain, and can lead to segmental deformity.

The positive, negative and biomechanical symptoms associated with spastic paresis can significantly affect patients’ quality of life, by affecting their ability to perform normal activities.

This paper – based on the content of a global spasticity interdisciplinary masterclass presented by the authors for healthcare practitioners working in the field of spastic paresis – proposes a multidisciplinary approach to care involving not only healthcare practitioners, but also the patient and their family members/carers, and improvement of the transition between specialist care and community services.

The suggested treatment pathway comprises assessment of the severity of spastic paresis, early access to neurorehabilitation and physiotherapy and treatment with botulinum toxin and new technologies, where appropriate. To address the challenge of maintaining patients’ motivation over the long term, tailored guided self-rehabilitation contracts can be used to set and monitor therapeutic goals. Current global consensus guidelines may have to be updated, to include a clinical care pathway related to the encompassing management of spastic paresis.

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[ARTICLE] Preparing a neuropediatric upper limb exergame rehabilitation system for home-use: a feasibility study | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

Fig. 1 The portable YouGrabber system. a A patient playing the Airplane game on the portable YouGrabber system. b The complete data glove with sensor-“box”, bending sensors, and vibrating units attached to the size fit neoprene glove. c The complete equipment packed for “take away”

Abstract

Background

Home-based, computer-enhanced therapy of hand and arm function can complement conventional interventions and increase the amount and intensity of training, without interfering too much with family routines. The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility and usability of the new portable version of the YouGrabber® system (YouRehab AG, Zurich, Switzerland) in the home setting.

Methods

Fifteen families of children (7 girls, mean age: 11.3y) with neuromotor disorders and affected upper limbs participated. They received instructions and took the system home to train for 2 weeks. After returning it, they answered questions about usability, motivation, and their general opinion of the system (Visual Analogue Scale; 0 indicating worst score, 100 indicating best score; ≤30 not satisfied, 31–69 average, ≥70 satisfied). Furthermore, total pure playtime and number of training sessions were quantified. To prove the usability of the system, number and sort of support requests were logged.

Results

The usability of the system was considered average to satisfying (mean 60.1–93.1). The lowest score was given for the occurrence of technical errors. Parents had to motivate their children to start (mean 66.5) and continue (mean 68.5) with the training. But in general, parents estimated the therapeutic benefit as high (mean 73.1) and the whole system as very good (mean 87.4). Children played on average 7 times during the 2 weeks; total pure playtime was 185 ± 45 min. Especially at the beginning of the trial, systems were very error-prone. Fortunately, we, or the company, solved most problems before the patients took the systems home. Nevertheless, 10 of 15 families contacted us at least once because of technical problems.

Conclusions

Despite that the YouGrabber® is a promising and highly accepted training tool for home-use, currently, it is still error-prone, and the requested support exceeds the support that can be provided by clinical therapists. A technically more robust system, combined with additional attractive games, likely results in higher patient motivation and better compliance. This would reduce the need for parents to motivate their children extrinsically and allow for clinical trials to investigate the effectiveness of the system.

Keywords

Data glove, Pediatrics ,Neurorehabilitation, Upper extremities ,YouGrabber, Tele-rehabilitation, Game-based, Cerebral palsy, Children and adolescents, Clinical utility, User satisfaction

Continue —>  Preparing a neuropediatric upper limb exergame rehabilitation system for home-use: a feasibility study | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

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[REVIEW] MIRROR THERAPY: A REVIEW OF EVIDENCES – Full Text PDF

Abstract

The aim of this review was to identify and summarize the existing evidences on mirror box therapy for the management of various musculoskeletal conditions. A systemic literature search was performed to identify studies concerning mirror therapy. The included journal articles were reviewed and assessed for itssignificance. Fifty one studies were identified and reviewed. Five different patient categories were studied: 24 studiesfocussed on mirror therapy after stroke, thirteen studies focussed on mirror therapy after an amputation, three studies focussed on mirror therapy with complex regional pain syndrome patients, two studies on mirror therapy for cerebral palsy and one study focussed on mirror therapy after a fracture. The articlesreviewed showed a trend that mirror therapy is effective in stroke, phantom limb pain, complex regional pain syndrome, cerebral palsy and fracture rehabilitation.

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[ARTICLE] Therapists’ Perceptions of Social Media and Video Game Technologies in Upper Limb Rehabilitation – Full Text HTML

ABSTRACT

Background: The application of technologies, such as video gaming and social media for rehabilitation, is garnering interest in the medical field. However, little research has examined clinicians’ perspectives regarding technology adoption by their clients.

Objective: The objective of our study was to explore therapists’ perceptions of how young people and adults with hemiplegia use gaming and social media technologies in daily life and in rehabilitation, and to identify barriers to using these technologies in rehabilitation.

Methods: We conducted two focus groups comprised of ten occupational therapists/physiotherapists who provide neurorehabilitation to individuals with hemiplegia secondary to stroke or cerebral palsy. Data was analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. The diffusion of innovations theory provided a framework to interpret emerging themes.

Results: Therapists were using technology in a limited capacity. They identified barriers to using social media and gaming technology with their clients, including a lack of age appropriateness, privacy issues with social media, limited transfer of training, and a lack of accessibility of current systems. Therapists also questioned their role in the context of technology-based interventions. The opportunity for social interaction was perceived as a major benefit of integrated gaming and social media.

Conclusions: This study reveals the complexities associated with adopting new technologies in clinical practice, including the need to consider both client and clinician factors. Despite reporting several challenges with applying gaming and social media technology with clinical populations, therapists identified opportunities for increased social interactions and were willing to help shape the development of an upper limb training system that could more readily meet the needs of clients with hemiplegia. By considering the needs of both therapists and clients, technology developers may increase the likelihood that clinicians will adopt innovative technologies.

Full Text HTML –>  JSG-Therapists’ Perceptions of Social Media and Video Game Technologies in Upper Limb Rehabilitation | Tatla | JMIR Serious Games.

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[Systematic REVIEW] Can non-immersive virtual reality improve physical outcomes of rehabilitation? – Full Text HTML/PDF

Purpose: To investigate whether non-immersive virtual reality interventions, either as an adjunct or an alternative to traditional therapy, can improve physical outcomes in rehabilitation.

Methods: We searched MEDLINE (1950 to present), CINAHL (1981 to present), AMED (1985 to present), EMBASE (1947 to present), Web of Science, PEDro, and Cochrane (no date limitation). Randomized controlled trials which explored the effects of non-immersive virtual reality on physical outcomes (physical function, movement, and balance) in populations of any age, sex, ethnicity or health condition, receiving rehabilitation were selected for review. We included virtual reality interventions that did not fully immerse the user; full immersion was defined as ‘a psychological state characterized by perceiving oneself to be enveloped by, included in, and interacting with an environment that provides a continuous stream of stimuli and experiences’.

Results: Sixteen randomized controlled trials were identified which matched inclusion and exclusion criteria. These studies explored the use of non-immersive virtual reality on physical outcomes in the rehabilitation of persons with stroke, cardiopulmonary conditions, cerebral palsy, osteoarthritis, and balance disorders.

Conclusion: There is growing evidence for the usefulness of non-immersive virtual reality as an adjunct to conventional therapy on physical outcomes particularly in stroke rehabilitation. There is little evidence to suggest that non-immersive virtual reality is more effective than conventional rehabilitation on physical outcomes in all populations included for review.

Can non-immersive virtual reality improve physical outcomes of rehabilitation?: Physical Therapy Reviews: Vol 17, No 1.

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