Posts Tagged post stroke

[Abstract] Wrist flexion rehabilitation device using arm mbed microcontroller for post-stroke patient – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Rehabilitation is a process of recovery of an individual from disabling or functionally limiting condition, whether temporary or irreversible, participates to regain maximal function, independence, and restoration [1]. The purpose of rehabilitation is to prevent and slow down the loss of function of the body, improve and restore the function, compensation for the lost function, and maintenance of the current function.

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via Wrist flexion rehabilitation device using arm mbed microcontroller for post-stroke patient – UTHM Institutional Repository

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[THESIS] The effectiveness of acupuncture in upper extremity motor function rehabilitation in post stroke patient–systematic literature review

The aim of this thesis is to find out the effects of acupuncture in upper extremity motor function rehabilitation in stroke patient. A form of systematic literature review is used to complete the thesis research. The component of the theoretical part includes background of stroke, such as pathology and complications. Upper extremity motor Function rehabilitation in stroke patient will be presented, as well as the basics of acupuncture, which extended to the definition, acupuncture mechanism, and evidence-based acupuncture. The effects of acupuncture in upper extremity motor function rehabilitation for stroke patient will be discussed.

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[Fact Sheet] Post-Stroke Rehabilitation Fact Sheet – National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Post-Stroke Rehabilitation Fact Sheet

In the United States more than 700,000 people suffer a stroke each year, and approximately two-thirds of these individuals survive and require rehabilitation. The goals of rehabilitation are to help survivors become as independent as possible and to attain the best possible quality of life. Even though rehabilitation does not “cure” the effects of stroke in that it does not reverse brain damage, rehabilitation can substantially help people achieve the best possible long-term outcome.

What is post-stroke rehabilitation?

Rehabilitation helps stroke survivors relearn skills that are lost when part of the brain is damaged. For example, these skills can include coordinating leg movements in order to walk or carrying out the steps involved in any complex activity. Rehabilitation also teaches survivors new ways of performing tasks to circumvent or compensate for any residual disabilities. Individuals may need to learn how to bathe and dress using only one hand, or how to communicate effectively when their ability to use language has been compromised. There is a strong consensus among rehabilitation experts that the most important element in any rehabilitation program is carefully directed,well-focused, repetitive practice—the same kind of practice used by all people when they learn a new skill, such as playing the piano or pitching a baseball.

Rehabilitative therapy begins in the acute-care hospital after the person’s overall condition has been stabilized, often within 24 to 48 hours after the stroke. The first steps involve promoting independent movement because many individuals are paralyzed or seriously weakened. Patients are prompted to change positions frequently while lying in bed and to engage in passive or active range of motion exercises to strengthen their stroke-impaired limbs. (“Passive” range-of-motion exercises are those in which the therapist actively helps the patient move a limb repeatedly, whereas “active” exercises are performed by the patient with no physical assistance from the therapist.) Depending on many factors—including the extent of the initial injury—patients may progress from sitting up and being moved between the bed and a chair to standing, bearing their own weight, and walking, with or without assistance. Rehabilitation nurses and therapists help patients who are able to perform progressively more complex and demanding tasks, such as bathing, dressing, and using a toilet, and they encourage patients to begin using their stroke-impaired limbs while engaging in those tasks. Beginning to reacquire the ability to carry out these basic activities of daily living represents the first stage in a stroke survivor’s return to independence.

For some stroke survivors, rehabilitation will be an ongoing process to maintain and refine skills and could involve working with specialists for months or years after the stroke.

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What disabilities can result from a stroke?

The types and degrees of disability that follow a stroke depend upon which area of the brain is damaged. Generally, stroke can cause five types of disabilities: paralysis or problems controlling movement; sensory disturbances including pain; problems using or understanding language; problems with thinking and memory; and emotional disturbances.

Paralysis or problems controlling movement (motor control)

Paralysis is one of the most common disabilities resulting from stroke. The paralysis is usually on the side of the body opposite the side of the brain damaged by stroke, and may affect the face, an arm, a leg, or the entire side of the body. This one-sided paralysis is called hemiplegia (one-sided weakness is called hemiparesis). Stroke patients with hemiparesis or hemiplegia may have difficulty with everyday activities such as walking or grasping objects. Some stroke patients have problems with swallowing, called dysphagia, due to damage to the part of the brain that controls the muscles for swallowing. Damage to a lower part of the brain, the cerebellum, can affect the body’s ability to coordinate movement, a disability called ataxia, leading to problems with body posture, walking, and balance.

Sensory disturbances including pain

Stroke patients may lose the ability to feel touch, pain, temperature, or position. Sensory deficits also may hinder the ability to recognize objects that patients are holding and can even be severe enough to cause loss of recognition of one’s own limb. Some stroke patients experience pain, numbness or odd sensations of tingling or prickling in paralyzed or weakened limbs, a symptom known as paresthesias.

The loss of urinary continence is fairly common immediately after a stroke and often results from a combination of sensory and motor deficits. Stroke survivors may lose the ability to sense the need to urinate or the ability to control bladder muscles. Some may lack enough mobility to reach a toilet in time. Loss of bowel control or constipation also may occur. Permanent incontinence after a stroke is uncommon, but even a temporary loss of bowel or bladder control can be emotionally difficult for stroke survivors.

Stroke survivors frequently have a variety of chronic pain syndromes resulting from stroke-induced damage to the nervous system (neuropathic pain). In some stroke patients, pathways for sensation in the brain are damaged, causing the transmission of false signals that result in the sensation of pain in a limb or side of the body that has the sensory deficit. The most common of these pain syndromes is called “thalamic pain syndrome” (caused by a stroke to the thalamus, which processes sensory information from the body to the brain), which can be difficult to treat even with medications. Finally, some pain that occurs after stroke is not due to nervous system damage, but rather to mechanical problems caused by the weakness from the stroke.  Patients who have a seriously weakened or paralyzed arm commonly experience moderate to severe pain that radiates outward from the shoulder. Most often, the pain results from lack of movement in a joint that has been immobilized for a prolonged period of time (such as having your arm or shoulder in a cast for weeks) and the tendons and ligaments around the joint become fixed in one position. This is commonly called a “frozen” joint; “passive” movement (the joint is gently moved or flexed by a therapist or caregiver rather than by the individual) at the joint in a paralyzed limb is essential to prevent painful “freezing” and to allow easy movement if and when voluntary motor strength returns.

Problems using or understanding language (aphasia)

At least one-fourth of all stroke survivors experience language impairments, involving the ability to speak, write, and understand spoken and written language. A stroke-induced injury to any of the brain’s language-control centers can severely impair verbal communication. The dominant centers for language are in the left side of the brain for right-handed individuals and many left-handers as well. Damage to a language center located on the dominant side of the brain, known as Broca’s area, causes expressive aphasia. People with this type of aphasia have difficulty conveying their thoughts through words or writing. They lose the ability to speak the words they are thinking and to put words together in coherent, grammatically correct sentences. In contrast, damage to a language center located in a rear portion of the brain, called Wernicke’s area, results in receptive aphasia. People with this condition have difficulty understanding spoken or written language and often have incoherent speech. Although they can form grammatically correct sentences, their utterances are often devoid of meaning. The most severe form of aphasia, global aphasia, is caused by extensive damage to several areas of the brain involved in language function. People with global aphasia lose nearly all their linguistic abilities; they cannot understand language or use it to convey thought.

Problems with thinking and memory

Stroke can cause damage to parts of the brain responsible for memory, learning, and awareness. Stroke survivors may have dramatically shortened attention spans or may experience deficits in short-term memory. Individuals also may lose their ability to make plans, comprehend meaning, learn new tasks, or engage in other complex mental activities. Two fairly common deficits resulting from stroke are anosognosia, an inability to acknowledge the reality of the physical impairments resulting from stroke, and neglect, the loss of the ability to respond to objects or sensory stimuli located on the stroke-impaired side. Stroke survivors who develop apraxia (loss of ability to carry out a learned purposeful movement) cannot plan the steps involved in a complex task and act on them in the proper sequence. Stroke survivors with apraxia also may have problems following a set of instructions. Apraxia appears to be caused by a disruption of the subtle connections that exist between thought and action.

Emotional disturbances

Many people who survive a stroke feel fear, anxiety, frustration, anger, sadness, and a sense of grief for their physical and mental losses. These feelings are a natural response to the psychological trauma of stroke. Some emotional disturbances and personality changes are caused by the physical effects of brain damage. Clinical depression, which is a sense of hopelessness that disrupts an individual’s ability to function, appears to be the emotional disorder most commonly experienced by stroke survivors. Signs of clinical depression include sleep disturbances, a radical change in eating patterns that may lead to sudden weight loss or gain, lethargy, social withdrawal, irritability, fatigue, self-loathing, and suicidal thoughts. Post-stroke depression can be treated with antidepressant medications and psychological counseling.

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What medical professionals specialize in post-stroke rehabilitation?

Post-stroke rehabilitation involves physicians; rehabilitation nurses; physical, occupational, recreational, speech-language, and vocational therapists; and mental health professionals.

Physicians

Physicians have the primary responsibility for managing and coordinating the long-term care of stroke survivors, including recommending which rehabilitation programs will best address individual needs. Physicians also are responsible for caring for the stroke survivor’s general health and providing guidance aimed at preventing a second stroke, such as controlling high blood pressure or diabetes and eliminating risk factors such as cigarette smoking, excessive weight, a high-cholesterol diet, and high alcohol consumption.

Neurologists usually lead acute-care stroke teams and direct patient care during hospitalization. They sometimes participate on the long-term rehabilitation team. Other subspecialists often lead the rehabilitation stage of care, especially physiatrists, who specialize in physical medicine and rehabilitation.

Rehabilitation nurses

Nurses specializing in rehabilitation help survivors relearn how to carry out the basic activities of daily living. They also educate survivors about routine health care, such as how to follow a medication schedule, how to care for the skin, how to move out of a bed and into a wheelchair, and special needs for people with diabetes. Rehabilitation nurses also work with survivors to reduce risk factors that may lead to a second stroke, and provide training for caregivers.

Nurses are closely involved in helping stroke survivors manage personal care issues, such as bathing and controlling incontinence. Most stroke survivors regain their ability to maintain continence, often with the help of strategies learned during rehabilitation. These strategies include strengthening pelvic muscles through special exercises and following a timed voiding schedule. If problems with incontinence continue, nurses can help caregivers learn to insert and manage catheters and to take special hygienic measures to prevent other incontinence-related health problems from developing.

Physical therapists

Physical therapists specialize in treating disabilities related to motor and sensory impairments. They are trained in all aspects of anatomy and physiology related to normal function, with an emphasis on movement. They assess the stroke survivor’s strength, endurance, range of motion, gait abnormalities, and sensory deficits to design individualized rehabilitation programs aimed at regaining control over motor functions.

Physical therapists help survivors regain the use of stroke-impaired limbs, teach compensatory strategies to reduce the effect of remaining deficits, and establish ongoing exercise programs to help people retain their newly learned skills. Disabled people tend to avoid using impaired limbs, a behavior called learned non-use. However, the repetitive use of impaired limbs encourages brain plasticity and helps reduce disabilities.

Strategies used by physical therapists to encourage the use of impaired limbs include selective sensory stimulation such as tapping or stroking, active and passive range-of-motion exercises, and temporary restraint of healthy limbs while practicing motor tasks.

In general, physical therapy emphasizes practicing isolated movements, repeatedly changing from one kind of movement to another, and rehearsing complex movements that require a great deal of coordination and balance, such as walking up or down stairs or moving safely between obstacles. People too weak to bear their own weight can still practice repetitive movements during hydrotherapy (in which water provides sensory stimulation as well as weight support) or while being partially supported by a harness. A recent trend in physical therapy emphasizes the effectiveness of engaging in goal-directed activities, such as playing games, to promote coordination. Physical therapists frequently employ selective sensory stimulation to encourage use of impaired limbs and to help survivors with neglect regain awareness of stimuli on the neglected side of the body.

Occupational and recreational therapists

Like physical therapists, occupational therapists are concerned with improving motor and sensory abilities, and ensuring patient safety in the post-stroke period. They help survivors relearn skills needed for performing self-directed activities (also called occupations) such as personal grooming, preparing meals, and housecleaning. Therapists can teach some survivors how to adapt to driving and provide on-road training. They often teach people to divide a complex activity into its component parts, practice each part, and then perform the whole sequence of actions. This strategy can improve coordination and may help people with apraxia relearn how to carry out planned actions.

Occupational therapists also teach people how to develop compensatory strategies and change elements of their environment that limit activities of daily living. For example, people with the use of only one hand can substitute hook and loop fasteners (such as Velcro) for buttons on clothing. Occupational therapists also help people make changes in their homes to increase safety, remove barriers, and facilitate physical functioning, such as installing grab bars in bathrooms.

Recreational therapists help people with a variety of disabilities to develop and use their leisure time to enhance their health, independence, and quality of life.

Speech-language pathologists

Speech-language pathologists help stroke survivors with aphasia relearn how to use language or develop alternative means of communication. They also help people improve their ability to swallow, and they work with patients to develop problem-solving and social skills needed to cope with the after-effects of a stroke.

Many specialized therapeutic techniques have been developed to assist people with aphasia. Some forms of short-term therapy can improve comprehension rapidly. Intensive exercises such as repeating the therapist’s words, practicing following directions, and doing reading or writing exercises form the cornerstone of language rehabilitation. Conversational coaching and rehearsal, as well as the development of prompts or cues to help people remember specific words, are sometimes beneficial. Speech-language pathologists also help stroke survivors develop strategies for circumventing language disabilities. These strategies can include the use of symbol boards or sign language. Recent advances in computer technology have spurred the development of new types of equipment to enhance communication.

Speech-language pathologists use special types of imaging techniques to study swallowing patterns of stroke survivors and identify the exact source of their impairment. Difficulties with swallowing have many possible causes, including a delayed swallowing reflex, an inability to manipulate food with the tongue, or an inability to detect food remaining lodged in the cheeks after swallowing. When the cause has been pinpointed, speech-language pathologists work with the individual to devise strategies to overcome or minimize the deficit. Sometimes, simply changing body position and improving posture during eating can bring about improvement. The texture of foods can be modified to make swallowing easier; for example, thin liquids, which often cause choking, can be thickened. Changing eating habits by taking small bites and chewing slowly can also help alleviate dysphagia.

Vocational therapists

Approximately one-fourth of all strokes occur in people between the ages of 45 and 65. For most people in this age group, returning to work is a major concern. Vocational therapists perform many of the same functions that ordinary career counselors do. They can help people with residual disabilities identify vocational strengths and develop résumés that highlight those strengths. They also can help identify potential employers, assist in specific job searches, and provide referrals to stroke vocational rehabilitation agencies.

Most important, vocational therapists educate disabled individuals about their rights and protections as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. This law requires employers to make “reasonable accommodations” for disabled employees. Vocational therapists frequently act as mediators between employers and employees to negotiate the provision of reasonable accommodations in the workplace.

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When can a stroke patient begin rehabilitation?

Rehabilitation should begin as soon as a stroke patient is stable, sometimes within 24 to 48 hours after a stroke. This first stage of rehabilitation can occur within an acute-care hospital; however, it is very dependent on the unique circumstances of the individual patient.

Recently, in the largest stroke rehabilitation study in the United States, researchers compared two common techniques to help stroke patients improve their walking.  Both methods—training on a body-weight supported treadmill or working on strength and balance exercises at home with a physical therapist—resulted in equal improvements in the individual’s ability to walk by the end of one year. Researchers found that functional improvements could be seen as late as one year after the stroke, which goes against the conventional wisdom that most recovery is complete by 6 months. The trial showed that 52 percent of the participants made significant improvements in walking, everyday function and quality of life, regardless of how severe their impairment was, or whether they started the training at 2 or 6 months after the stroke.

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Where can a stroke patient get rehabilitation?

At the time of discharge from the hospital, the stroke patient and family coordinate with hospital social workers to locate a suitable living arrangement. Many stroke survivors return home, but some move into some type of medical facility.

Inpatient rehabilitation units

Inpatient facilities may be freestanding or part of larger hospital complexes. Patients stay in the facility, usually for 2 to 3 weeks, and engage in a coordinated, intensive program of rehabilitation. Such programs often involve at least 3 hours of active therapy a day, 5 or 6 days a week. Inpatient facilities offer a comprehensive range of medical services, including full-time physician supervision and access to the full range of therapists specializing in post-stroke rehabilitation.

Outpatient units

Outpatient facilities are often part of a larger hospital complex and provide access to physicians and the full range of therapists specializing in stroke rehabilitation. Patients typically spend several hours, often 3 days each week, at the facility taking part in coordinated therapy sessions and return home at night. Comprehensive outpatient facilities frequently offer treatment programs as intense as those of inpatient facilities, but they also can offer less demanding regimens, depending on the patient’s physical capacity.

Nursing facilities

Rehabilitative services available at nursing facilities are more variable than are those at inpatient and outpatient units. Skilled nursing facilities usually place a greater emphasis on rehabilitation, whereas traditional nursing homes emphasize residential care. In addition, fewer hours of therapy are offered compared to outpatient and inpatient rehabilitation units.

Home-based rehabilitation programs

Home rehabilitation allows for great flexibility so that patients can tailor their program of rehabilitation and follow individual schedules. Stroke survivors may participate in an intensive level of therapy several hours per week or follow a less demanding regimen. These arrangements are often best suited for people who require treatment by only one type of rehabilitation therapist. Patients dependent on Medicare coverage for their rehabilitation must meet Medicare’s “homebound” requirements to qualify for such services; at this time lack of transportation is not a valid reason for home therapy. The major disadvantage of home-based rehabilitation programs is the lack of specialized equipment. However, undergoing treatment at home gives people the advantage of practicing skills and developing compensatory strategies in the context of their own living environment. In the recent stroke rehabilitation trial, intensive balance and strength rehabilitation in the home was equivalent to treadmill training at a rehabilitation facility in improving walking.

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What research is being done?

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), a component of the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), has primary responsibility for sponsoring research on disorders of the brain and nervous system, including the acute phase of stroke and the restoration of function after stroke.  The NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, through its National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, funds work on mechanisms of restoration and repair after stroke, as well as development of new approaches to rehabilitation and evaluation of outcomes.  Most of the NIH-funded work on diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia is through the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.  The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering collaborates with NINDS and NICHD in developing new instrumentation for stroke treatment and rehabilitation.  The National Eye Institute funds work directed at restoration of vision and rehabilitation for individuals with impaired or low vision that may be due to vascular disease or stroke.

The NINDS supports research on ways to enhance repair and regeneration of the central nervous system. Scientists funded by the NINDS are studying how the brain responds to experience or adapts to injury by reorganizing its functions (plasticity)—using noninvasive imaging technologies to map patterns of biological activity inside the brain. Other NINDS-sponsored scientists are looking at brain reorganization after stroke and determining whether specific rehabilitative techniques, such as constraint-induced movement therapy and transcranial magnetic stimulation, can stimulate brain plasticity, thereby improving motor function and decreasing disability. Other scientists are experimenting with implantation of neural stem cells, to see if these cells may be able to replace the cells that died as a result of a stroke.

*An ischemic stroke or “brain attack” occurs when brain cells die because of inadequate blood flow. When blood flow is interrupted, brain cells are robbed of vital supplies of oxygen and nutrients. About 80 percent of strokes are caused by the blockage of an artery in the neck or brain. A hemorrhagic stroke is caused by a burst blood vessel in the brain that causes bleeding into or around the brain.

**Functions compromised when a specific region of the brain is damaged by stroke can sometimes be taken over by other parts of the brain. This ability to adapt and change is known as neuroplasticity.

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Where can I get more information?

For more information on neurological disorders or research programs funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, contact the Institute’s Brain Resources and Information Network (BRAIN) at:

BRAIN
P.O. Box 5801
Bethesda, MD 20824
800-352-9424
http://www.ninds.nih.gov

Information also is available from the following organizations:

American Stroke Association: A Division of American Heart Association
7272 Greenville Avenue

Dallas, TX 75231-4596

Tel: 888-4STROKE (478-7653)
Brain Aneurysm Foundation
269 Hanover Street, Building 3

Hanover, MA 02339

Tel: 781-826-5556; 888-BRAIN02 (272-4602)
Brain Attack Coalition
31 Center Drive
Room 8A07

Bethesda, MD 20892-2540

Tel: 301-496-5751
Children’s Hemiplegia and Stroke Assocn. (CHASA)
4101 West Green Oaks Blvd., Ste. 305
PMB 149

Arlington, TX 76016

Tel: 817-492-4325
Fibromuscular Dysplasia Society of America (FMDSA)
20325 Center Ridge Road Suite 620

Rocky River, OH 44116

Tel: 216-834-2410; 888-709-7089
Hazel K. Goddess Fund for Stroke Research in Women
785 Park Road, #3E

New York, NY 10021

Heart Rhythm Society
1325 G Street, N.W.
Suite 400

Washington, DC 20005

Tel: 202-464-3454
Joe Niekro Foundation
PO Box 2876

Scottsdale, AZ 85252

Tel: 602-318-1013
National Aphasia Association
P.O. Box 87

Scarsdale, NY 10583

Tel: 212-267-2814; 800-922-4NAA (4622)
National Stroke Association
9707 East Easter Lane
Suite B

Centennial, CO 80112-3747

Tel: 303-649-9299; 800-STROKES (787-6537)
YoungStroke, Inc.
P.O. Box 692

Conway, SC 29528

Tel: 843-248-9019; 843-655-2835

“Post-Stroke Fact Sheet”, NINDS, Publication date September 2014.

NIH Publication No. 14-1846

Stroke fact sheet available in multiple languages through MedlinePlus

Back to Stroke Information

See a list of all NINDS disorders


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Prepared by:
Office of Communications and Public Liaison
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 20892
NINDS health-related material is provided for information purposes only and does not necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient’s medical history.

All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated.

 

via Post-Stroke Rehabilitation Fact Sheet | National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

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[WEB PAGE] MEDRhythms Launches Trial of Post-Stroke Walking Device

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MEDRhythms Inc has launched a randomized controlled trial (RCT) at five top rehab hospitals and research centers across the country to examine the impact of a digital therapeutic device on stroke survivors who have post-stroke walking impairments, in support of the company’s eventual FDA submission.

“This clinical trial marks an important milestone toward MEDRhythms’ mission to make this high-quality intervention available to those who need and deserve to have it,” says Brian Harris, Co-Founder and CEO of Portland, Me-based MEDRhythms, in a media release. “As this new industry grows, it is important for digital therapeutics to demonstrate efficacy with the support of rigorous clinical trials, and this RCT is an integral step in MEDRhythms’ evidence generation strategy to do so.”

MEDRhythms’ clinical trial will be conducted at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab in Chicago, the Kessler Foundation in New Jersey, Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, and the Boston University Neuromotor Recovery Laboratory in Boston. This trial was launched following completion of a successful feasibility study in the target population, which was conducted at the Boston University Neuromotor Recovery Lab. The results of this feasibility study will be announced at the American Physical Therapy Association’s annual Combined Sections Meeting in February 2020 in Denver, Colorado.

“Right now, the MEDRhythms digital therapeutic technology is a novel treatment for a subset of individuals that have few, if any, effective treatment options,” states David Putrino, the Director of Abilities Research Center (ARC) for the Department of Rehabilitation and Human Performance at the Mount Sinai Health System and the Principal Investigator at MEDRhythms’ Mount Sinai clinical trial site.

“The mission of the ARC is to identify and validate novel technologies that have the potential to significantly enhance the rehabilitation of people who are recovering from brain injuries and neurological conditions, including chronic stroke. The digital therapeutics industry has the potential to transform rehabilitation and disrupt healthcare, and it is imperative for companies in this space to run full-scale, multisite RCTs like MEDRhythms is doing.”

The digital therapeutic for post-stroke walking rehabilitation is one of a full pipeline of products that include therapeutics for indications such as Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, aging, and fall prevention, for which the company is actively exploring partnerships, per the release.

[Source(s): MEDRhythms, Business Wire]

 

via MEDRhythms Launches Trial of Post-Stroke Walking Device – Rehab Managment

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[ARTICLE] Robot-Assisted Stair Climbing Training on Postural Control and Sensory Integration Processes in Chronic Post-stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial – Full Text

Background: Postural control disturbances are one of the important causes of disability in stroke patients affecting balance and mobility. The impairment of sensory input integration from visual, somatosensory and vestibular systems contributes to postural control disorders in post-stroke patients. Robot-assisted gait training may be considered a valuable tool in improving gait and postural control abnormalities.

Objective: The primary aim of the study was to compare the effects of robot-assisted stair climbing training against sensory integration balance training on static and dynamic balance in chronic stroke patients. The secondary aims were to compare the training effects on sensory integration processes and mobility.

Methods: This single-blind, randomized, controlled trial involved 32 chronic stroke outpatients with postural instability. The experimental group (EG, n = 16) received robot-assisted stair climbing training. The control group (n = 16) received sensory integration balance training. Training protocols lasted for 5 weeks (50 min/session, two sessions/week). Before, after, and at 1-month follow-up, a blinded rater evaluated patients using a comprehensive test battery. Primary outcome: Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Secondary outcomes:10-meter walking test, 6-min walking test, Dynamic gait index (DGI), stair climbing test (SCT) up and down, the Time Up and Go, and length of sway and sway area of the Center of Pressure (CoP) assessed using the stabilometric assessment.

Results: There was a non-significant main effect of group on primary and secondary outcomes. A significant Time × Group interaction was measured on 6-min walking test (p = 0.013) and on posturographic outcomes (p = 0.005). Post hoc within-group analysis showed only in the EG a significant reduction of sway area and the CoP length on compliant surface in the eyes-closed and dome conditions.

Conclusion: Postural control disorders in patients with chronic stroke may be ameliorated by robot-assisted stair climbing training and sensory integration balance training. The robot-assisted stair climbing training contributed to improving sensorimotor integration processes on compliant surfaces. Clinical trial registration (NCT03566901).

Introduction

Postural control disturbances are one of the leading causes of disability in stroke patients, leading to problems with transferring, maintaining body position, mobility, and walking (Bruni et al., 2018). Therefore, the recovery of postural control is one of the main goals of post-stroke patients. Various and mixed components (i.e., weakness, joint limitation, alteration of tone, loss of movement coordination and sensory organization components) can affect postural control. Indeed, the challenge is to determine the relative weight placed on each of these factors and their interaction to plan specific rehabilitation programs (Bonan et al., 2004).

The two functional goals of postural control are postural orientation and equilibrium. The former involves the active alignment of the trunk and head to gravity, the base of support, visual surround and an internal reference. The latter involves the coordination of movement strategies to stabilize the center of body mass during self-initiated and externally triggered stability perturbations. Postural control during static and dynamic conditions requires a complex interaction between musculoskeletal and neural systems (Horak, 2006). Musculoskeletal components include biomechanical constraints such as the joint range of motion, muscle properties and limits of stability (Horak, 2006). Neural components include sensory and perceptual processes, motor processes involved in organizing muscles into neuromuscular synergies, and higher-level processes essential to plan and execute actions requiring postural control (Shumway-Cook and Woollacott, 2012). A disorder in any of these systems may affect postural control during static (in quite stance) and dynamic (gait) tasks and increase the risk of falling (Horak, 2006).

Literature emphasized the role of impairments of sensory input integration from visual, somatosensory and vestibular systems in leading to postural control disorders in post-stroke patients (Bonan et al., 2004Smania et al., 2008). Healthy persons rely on somatosensory (70%), vision (10%) and vestibular (20%) information when standing on a firm base of support in a well-lit environment (Peterka, 2002). Conversely, in quite stance on an unstable surface, they increase sensory weighting to vestibular and vision information as they decrease their dependence on surface somatosensory inputs for postural orientation (Peterka, 2002). Bonan et al. (2004) investigate whether post-stroke postural control disturbances may be caused by the inability to select the pertinent somatosensory, vestibular or visual information. Forty patients with hemiplegia after a single hemisphere chronic stroke (at least 12 months) performed computerized dynamic posturography to assess the patient’s ability to use sensory inputs separately and to suppress inaccurate inputs in case of sensory conflict. Six sensory conditions were assessed by an equilibrium score, as a measure of body stability. Results show that patients with hemiplegia seem to rely mostly on visual input. In conditions of altered somatosensory information, with visual deprivation or visuo-vestibular conflict, the patient’s performance was significantly lower than healthy subjects. The mechanism of this excessive visual reliance remains unclear. However, higher-level inability to select the appropriate sensory input rather than to elementary sensory impairment has been advocated as a potential mechanism of action (Bonan et al., 2004).

Sensory strategies and sensory reweighting processes are essential to generate effective movement strategies (ankle, hip, and stepping strategies) which can be resolved through feed-back or feed-forward postural adjustments. The cerebral cortex shapes these postural responses both directly via corticospinal loops and indirectly via the brainstem centers (Jacobs and Horak, 2007). Moreover, the cerebellar- and basal ganglia-cortical loop is responsible for adapting postural responses according to prior experience and for optimizing postural responses, respectively (Jacobs and Horak, 2007).

Rehabilitation is the cornerstone in the management of postural control disorders in post-stroke patients (Pollock et al., 2014). To date, no one physical rehabilitation approach can be considered more effective than any other approach (Pollock et al., 2014). Specific treatments should be chosen according to the individual requirements and the evidence available for that specific treatment. Moreover, it appears to be most beneficial a mixture of different treatment for an individual patient (Pollock et al., 2014). Considering that, rehabilitation involving repetitive, high intensity, task-specific exercises is the pathway for restoring motor function after stroke (Mehrholz et al., 2013Lo et al., 2017) robotic assistive devices for gait training have been progressively being used in neurorehabilitation to Sung et al. (2017). In the current literature, three primary evidence have been reported.

Firstly, a recent literature review highlights that robot-assisted gait training is advantageous as add-on therapy in stroke rehabilitation, as it adds special therapeutic effects that could not be afforded by conventional therapy alone (Morone et al., 2017Sung et al., 2017). Specifically, robot-assisted gait training was beneficial for improving motor recovery, gait function, and postural control in post-stroke patients (Morone et al., 2017Sung et al., 2017). Stroke patients who received physiotherapy treatment in combination with robotic devices were more likely to reach better outcomes compared to patients who received conventional training alone (Bruni et al., 2018).

Second, the systematic review by Swinnen et al. (2014) supported the use of robot-assisted gait therapy to improve postural control in subacute and chronic stroke patients. A wide variability among studies was reported about the robotic-device system and the therapy doses (3–5 times per week, 3–10 weeks, 12–25 sessions). However, significant improvements (Cohen’s d = 0.01 to 3.01) in postural control scores measured with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Tinetti test, postural sway tests, and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test were found after robot-assisted gait training. Interestingly, in five studies an end-effector device (gait trainer) was used (Peurala et al., 2005Tong et al., 2006Dias et al., 2007Ng et al., 2008Conesa et al., 2012). In two study, the exoskeleton was used (Hidler et al., 2009Westlake and Patten, 2009). In one study, a single joint wearable knee orthosis was used (Wong et al., 2012). Because the limited number of studies available and methodological differences among them, more specific randomized controlled trial in specific populations are necessary to draw stronger conclusions (Swinnen et al., 2014).

Finally, technological and scientific development has led to the implementation of robotic devices specifically designed to overcome the motor limitation in different tasks. With this perspective, the robot-assisted end-effector-based stair climbing (RASC) is a promising approach to facilitate task-specific activity and cardiovascular stress (Hesse et al., 20102012Tomelleri et al., 2011Stoller et al., 20142016Mazzoleni et al., 2017).

To date, no studies have been performed on the effects of RASC training in improving postural control and sensory integration processes in chronic post-stroke patients.

The primary aim of the study was to compare the effects of robot-assisted stair climbing training against sensory integration balance training on static and dynamic balance in chronic stroke patients. The secondary aims were to compare the training effects on sensory integration processes and mobility. The hypothesis was that the task-specific and repetitive robot-assisted stairs climbing training might act as sensory integration balance training, improving postural control because sensorimotor integration processes are essential for balance and walking.[…]

 

Continue —->  Frontiers | Robot-Assisted Stair Climbing Training on Postural Control and Sensory Integration Processes in Chronic Post-stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial | Neuroscience

Figure 1. The G-EO system used in the Robot-Assisted Stair-Climbing Training (Written informed consent was obtained from the individual pictured, for the publication of this image).

 

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[WEB SITE] Telerehab vs In-Clinic for Post-Stroke Arm Weakness: Which One Wins?

Old woman training at home

Telerehabilitation was not inferior to in-clinic rehabilitation therapy in helping to improve arm function after stroke but could substantially increase access to therapy for those who are unable to access a rehabilitation clinic, researchers opine.

“Few patients fully recover from arm weakness after a stroke. The remainder demonstrate persistent arm impairments that are directly linked to activity limitations, participation restrictions, reduced quality of life, and decreased well-being,” Steven C. Cramer, MD, from the department of neurology at the University of California, Irvine, and colleagues write, in a study published in JAMA Neurology.

“Some rehabilitation therapies can improve these deficits, with higher doses associated with better outcomes. However, many patients do not receive high doses of rehabilitation therapy, for reasons that include cost, difficulty traveling to the location where therapy is provided, shortage of regional rehabilitation care, and poor adherence with assignments,” they continue, in a media release from Healio.

Cramer and colleagues conducted a randomized, assessor-blinded, noninferiority clinical trial to compare telerehabilitation and in-clinic rehabilitation therapy outcomes for patients who had a stroke that resulted in arm motor deficit.

Patients were enrolled in the study at 4 to 36 weeks after experiencing an ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage that resulted in arm weakness. After enrollment, participants were randomly assigned to receive intensive arm motor therapy in a rehabilitation clinic or in their home using telerehabilitation delivery services with a computer connected to the internet. Scores on the Fugl-Myer arm motor scale were measured at the baseline and after treatment to determine changes in arm motor function.

All patients received 36 treatment sessions (70 minutes) in a 6- to 8-week period, which included 18 supervised and 18 unsupervised sessions. The content of therapy was carefully matched, with each group using the same exercises and standard exercise equipment.

A total of 124 participants were included in the study. Participants had a mean age of 61 years, a mean baseline Fugl-Meyer score of 43 points and were enrolled for a mean 18.7 weeks following stroke, the release explains.

Patients in the in-clinic group were adherent to 33.6 of 36 therapy sessions (93.3%), and those who received telerehabilitation at home were adherent to 35.4 of 36 therapy sessions (98.3%).

Both groups experienced significant changes in Fugl-Meyer scores from the baseline period to 30 days after treatment, with a mean change of 8.36 points in patients who received in-clinic therapy and 7.86 points in those who received telerehabilitation therapy.

The noninferiority margin was 2.47 and fell outside the 95% confidence interval, suggesting that telerehabilitation was not inferior to in-clinic therapy.

“Our study found that a 6-week course of daily home-based [telerehabilitation] is safe, is rated favorably by patients, is associated with excellent treatment adherence, and produces substantial gains in arm function that were not inferior to dose-matched interventions delivered in the clinic,” Cramer and colleagues conclude, in the release.

[Source: Healio Primary Care]

 

via Telerehab vs In-Clinic for Post-Stroke Arm Weakness: Which One Wins? – Physical Therapy Products

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[WEB SITE] ReStore™ Exo-Suit – ReWalk – More Than Walking

ReStore Soft Exo-Suit – A Revolution in Post-Stroke Gait Training
What is the ReStore?

The ReStore is a powered, lightweight soft exo-suit intended for use in the rehabilitation of persons with lower limb disability due to stroke. It will be a first of its kind gait training solution.

Functional

The ReStore soft design combines natural movements with plantarflexion and dorsiflexion assistance that adaptively synchronize with the patient’s own gait to facilitate functional gait training.

Versatile

Individualized levels of assistance and compatibility with supplemental support aids ensure that ReStore has broad applications for patients across the gait rehabilitation spectrum.

 

Data-Driven

Real time feedback and adjustable levels of assistance enable the therapist to optimize sessions and track each patient’s progress.

How Does ReStore Compare to Other Stroke Rehabilitation Methods?

Click here to contact us for more information and to discuss bringing ReStore to your clinic. Click here to download the ReStore brochure.

via ReStore™ Exo-Suit – ReWalk – More Than Walking

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[JUST ACCEPTED] “Increased Sensorimotor Cortex Activation with Decreased Motor Performance during Functional Upper Extremity Tasks Post-Stroke” – Abstract

The following article has just been accepted for publication in Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy.

“Increased Sensorimotor Cortex Activation with Decreased Motor Performance during Functional Upper Extremity Tasks Post-Stroke”

By Shannon B Lim, MSc, MPT; Janice J Eng

Provisional Abstract:

Background: Current literature has focused on identifying neuroplastic changes associated with stroke through tasks and in positions that are not representative of functional rehabilitation. Emerging technologies such as functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) provide new methods of expanding the area of neuroplasticity within rehabilitation.
Purpose: This study determined the differences in sensorimotor cortex activation during unrestrained reaching and gripping after stroke.
Methods: 11 healthy and 11 chronic post-stroke individuals completed reaching and gripping tasks under three conditions using their 1) stronger, 2) weaker, and 3) both arms together. Performance and sensorimotor cortex activation using fNIRS were collected. Group and arm differences were calculated using mixed ANCOVA (covariate: age). Pairwise comparisons were used for post-hoc analyses. Partial Pearson’s correlations between performance and activation were assessed for each task, group, and hemisphere.
Results: Larger sensorimotor activations in the ipsilesional hemisphere were found for the stroke compared to healthy group for reaching and gripping conditions despite poorer performance. Significant correlations were observed between gripping performance (with the weaker arm and both arms simultaneously) and sensorimotor activation for the stroke group only.
Discussion: Stroke leads to significantly larger sensorimotor activation during functional reaching and gripping despite poorer performance. This may indicate an increased sense of effort, decreased efficiency, or increased difficulty after stroke.
Conclusion: fNIRS can be used for assessing differences in brain activation during movements in functional positions after stroke. This can be a promising tool for investigating possible neuroplastic changes associated with functional rehabilitation interventions in the stroke population.

Supplemental Digital Content 1. Video abstract .mp4

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via JUST ACCEPTED: “Increased Sensorimotor Cortex Activation with Decreased Motor Performance during Functional Upper Extremity Tasks Post-Stroke”

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[NEWS] UTech research provides hope for stroke patients

Published: April 18, 2019 

Research by Professor Felix Akinladejo, recently appointed professor of computer information systems in the Faculty of Engineering and Computing, University of Technology, Jamaica, on computer model and virtual reality technology for post-stroke rehabilitation, is offering hope for stroke patients.

Akinladejo elaborated on his research focusing on the use of the techno-therapy intervention technique to aid in the rehabilitation therapy of post-acute stroke patients to improve movement and/or functional ability in his inaugural professorial lecture titled ‘Computer Model and Virtual Reality Technology for Post -Stroke Rehabilitation: A Techno-Therapy Intervention Technique’, held recently at the university’s Papine campus.

The research follows from Akinladejo’s PhD dissertation, which focused on computer-supported rehabilitation management of post-acute stroke patients.

The techno-therapy rehabilitation system consists of the computer model used to measure the gait variables and the virtual reality technology used to provide the exercise that stroke patients perform for physical therapy.

Akinladejo pointed to World Health Organization data, which showed that stroke deaths in Jamaica reached 2,474 or 14.44 per cent of total deaths in 2017.

Noting that the challenge, especially in developing countries like Jamaica, is the inability to provide and sustain physical rehabilitation therapy, Akinladejo said that his research would augment present treatment options and knowledge for professionals concerned with rehabilitation management, practitioners of physical therapy, bioengineering, and all concerned with human movement. He shared examples of his work done with post-stroke patients to manage plantar flexion and dorsiflexion movements of the ankle and foot in order to approve their range of motion.

Akinladejo is also leading UTech, Jamaica’s collaborative research with the University of Pennsylvania, USA, to investigate rehabilitation after CVDs and stroke.

The partnership has led to a programme that is currently providing third-year engineering students with training in the basic elements of robotics, with a focus on rehabilitative robotics in the Jamaican context.

NCD’S ON THE RISE

Dr Christopher Tufton, minister of health, who brought greetings, highlighted the importance of Akinladejo’s research in the context of the increase in non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension affecting large segments of the population and which may lead to stroke and the subsequent need for physical rehabilitation. The health minister urged more focus on the type of applied research being done by Akinladejo to find solutions to Jamaica’s health challenges.

“We can’t confront these challenges by confining our efforts to the practitioners directly involved in public health” the minister said, adding that “the new approach to dealing with public health has to be a lot more holistic and collaborative”.

Professor Stephen Vasciannie, president of the UTech, congratulated Akinladejo on his appointment to the rank of professor at the university, noting that over his 25 years of service to the institution, he had been promoted through the various academic ranks.

The president noted that “his promotion is testament to his body of extensive research work and his distinguished teaching career in computer science and engineering, which began in his native Nigeria”.

Professor Nilza Aples, dean, Faculty of Engineering and Computing, in her congratulations to Akinladejo, pointed out that although doctoral research work is expected to provide innovative ideas and solutions to problems, not all have the impact of improving human life or augmenting recovery in post-acute stroke patients as shown from the research work spearheaded by Akinladejo.

The dean noted that the Faculty of Engineering and Computing would continue to “position itself as a source of ‘know-how’ in the areas of engineering and computer science and as a technological provider of solutions that offer national and international impact.”

 

via UTech research provides hope for stroke patients | News | Jamaica Gleaner

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[VIDEO] Post Stroke Foot Dorsiflexion: Using Electrical Stimulation to Reduce Tone & Promote Plasticity – YouTube

Further reading on electrophysiology and muscle contractions: http://strokemed.com/motor-behaviour-…

via  Post Stroke Foot Dorsiflexion: Using Electrical Stimulation to Reduce Tone & Promote Plasticity – YouTube

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