Posts Tagged locomotion

[ARTICLE] The Efficacy of State of the Art Overground Gait Rehabilitation Robotics: A Bird’s Eye View – Full Text

Abstract

To date, rehabilitation robotics has come a long way effectively aiding the rehabilitation process of the patients suffering from paraplegia or hemiplegia due to spinal cord injury (SCI) or stroke respectively, through partial or even full functional recovery of the affected limb. The increased therapeutic outcome primarily results from a combination of increased patient independence and as well as reduced physical burden on the therapist. Especially for the case of gait rehabilitation following SCI or stroke, the rehab robots have the potential to significantly increase the independence of the patient during the rehabilitation process without the patient’s safety being compromised. An intensive gait-oriented rehabilitation therapy is often effective irrespective of the type of rehabilitation paradigm. However, eventually overground gait training, in comparison with body-weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT), has the potential of higher therapeutic outcome due its associated biomechanics being very close to that of the natural gait. Recognizing the apparent superiority of the overground gait training paradigms, a through literature survey on all the major overground robotic gait rehabilitation approaches was carried out and is presented in this paper. The survey includes an in-depth comparative study amongst these robotic approaches in terms of gait rehabilitation efficacy.

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Source: The Efficacy of State of the Art Overground Gait Rehabilitation Robotics: A Bird’s Eye View

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[Abstract] Robotic Devices to Enhance Human Movement Performance.

Abstract

Robotic exoskeletons and bionic prostheses have moved from science fiction to science reality in the last decade. These robotic devices for assisting human movement are now technically feasible given recent advancements in robotic actuators, sensors, and computer processors. However, despite the ability to build robotic hardware that is wearable by humans, we still do not have optimal controllers to allow humans to move with coordination and grace in synergy with the robotic devices. We consider the history of robotic exoskeletons and bionic limb prostheses to provide a better assessment of the roadblocks that have been overcome and to gauge the roadblocks that still remain. There is a strong need for kinesiologists to work with engineers to better assess the performance of robotic movement assistance devices. In addition, the identification of new performance metrics that can objectively assess multiple dimensions of human performance with robotic exoskeletons and bionic prostheses would aid in moving the field forward. We discuss potential control approaches for these robotic devices, with a preference for incorporating feedforward neural signals from human users to provide a wider repertoire of discrete and adaptive rhythmic movements.

Source: Robotic Devices to Enhance Human Movement Performance: Kinesiology Review: Vol 6, No 1

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[Abstract] Factors Influencing the Efficacy of Aerobic Exercise for Improving Fitness and Walking Capacity After Stroke: A Meta-Analysis with Meta-Regression.

Abstract

Objective

To assess the influence of dosing parameters and patient characteristics on the efficacy of aerobic exercise (AEX) post-stroke.

Data Sources

A systematic review was conducted using Pubmed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro and Academic Search Complete.

Study Selection

Studies were selected that compared AEX to a non-aerobic control group among ambulatory persons with stroke.

Data Extraction

Extracted outcome data included: peak oxygen consumption during exercise testing (VO2peak), walking speed and walking endurance (6-minute walk test). Independent variables of interest were: AEX mode (seated or walking), AEX intensity (moderate or vigorous), AEX volume (total hours), stroke chronicity and baseline outcome scores.

Data Synthesis

Significant between-study heterogeneity was confirmed for all outcomes. Pooled AEX effect size estimates (AEX change – control change) from random effects models were: VO2peak, 2.2 mL/kg/min [95% CI: 1.3, 3.1]; walking speed, 0.06 m/s [95% CI: 0.01, 0.11]; and 6-minute walk test distance, 29 m [95% CI: 15, 42]. From meta-regression, greater VO2peak effect sizes were significantly associated with higher AEX intensity and higher baseline VO2peak. Greater effect sizes for walking speed and the 6-minute walk test were significantly associated with a walking AEX mode. In contrast, seated AEX did not have a significant effect on walking outcomes.

Conclusions

AEX significantly improves aerobic capacity post-stroke, but may need to be task specific to impact walking speed and endurance. Higher AEX intensity is associated with better outcomes. Future randomized studies are needed to confirm these results.

Source: Factors Influencing the Efficacy of Aerobic Exercise for Improving Fitness and Walking Capacity After Stroke: A Meta-Analysis with Meta-Regression – Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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[Abstract] Normal and impaired control of functional movements in stroke: Role of neural interlimb coupling – Clinical Neurophysiology

Highlights

A task-specific neural interlimb coupling mechanism underlies functional movements in humans.

After a stroke, the neural coupling mechanism is preserved from the unaffected side but defective from the affected limb(s).

Based on the knowledge of neural coupling, training of cooperative limb movements should be integrated into neuro-rehabilitation.

Abstract

In recent years it has become evident that, in a number of functional movements, synergistically acting limbs become task-specifically linked by a soft-wired ‘neural coupling’ mechanism (e.g. the legs during balancing, the arms and legs during gait and both arms during cooperative hand movements). Experimentally this mechanism became evident by the analysis of reflex responses as a marker for a neural coupling. It is reflected by the task-specific appearance of reflex EMG responses to non-noxious nerve stimulation, not only in muscles of the stimulated limb, but also, with same long latency, in muscles of meaningful coupled (contralateral) limb(s).

After a stroke, nerve stimulation of the unaffected limb during such cooperative tasks is followed by EMG responses in muscles of the (contralateral) coupled affected limb, i.e. unaffected motor centres influence synergistically acting movements of the paretic limb. In contrast, following stimulation of the affected limb, no contralateral responses appear due to defective processing of afferent input. As a consequence, it may be therapeutically possible to strengthen the influence of unaffected motor centres on the performance of affected limb movements through training of cooperative limb movements required during activities of daily living.

Source: Normal and impaired control of functional movements in stroke: Role of neural interlimb coupling – Clinical Neurophysiology

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[REVIEW] The effect of gait training and exercise programs on gait and balance in post-stroke patients – Full Text PDF

The aim of this review is to evaluate studies about gait training and exercise interventions applied to patients following chronic stroke on gait and balance.

The studies included in this review were random clinical trials, including only chronic post-stroke individuals that evaluated gait and balance outcomes and with a PEDro scale score ≥ 7.0. Eight studies were selected.

The results suggest gait and balance will only be affected in chronic post-stroke patients if training sessions last at least 30 minutes, are repeated three times a week, and maintained for at least five weeks. Gait training affects how chronic post-stroke individuals walk. They will probably walk faster and with a lower risk of falling; however, it is unclear whether the consequences of these procedures affect the quality of life.

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Locomotor Training Improves Daily Stepping Activity and Gait Efficiency in Individuals Poststroke Who Have Reached a “Plateau” in Recovery

…Conclusions— Intensive LT results in improved daily stepping in individuals poststroke who have been discharged from PT because of a perceived plateau in motor function. These improvements may be related to the amount and intensity of stepping practice…

μέσω Locomotor Training Improves Daily Stepping Activity and Gait Efficiency in Individuals Poststroke Who Have Reached a “Plateau” in Recovery.

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