Posts Tagged multiple sclerosis

[Abstract] The treatment of fatigue by non-invasive brain stimulation

Summary

The use of non-invasive brain neurostimulation (NIBS) techniques to treat neurological or psychiatric diseases is currently under development. Fatigue is a commonly observed symptom in the field of potentially treatable pathologies by NIBS, yet very little data has been published regarding its treatment. We conducted a review of the literature until the end of February 2017 to analyze all the studies that reported a clinical assessment of the effects of NIBS techniques on fatigue. We have limited our analysis to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We found only 15 studies on this subject, including 8 tDCS studies and 7 rTMS studies. Of the tDCS studies, 6 concerned patients with multiple sclerosis while 6 rTMS studies concerned fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome. The remaining 3 studies included patients with post-polio syndrome, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Three cortical regions were targeted: the primary sensorimotor cortex, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the posterior parietal cortex. In all cases, tDCS protocols were performed according to a bipolar montage with the anode over the cortical target. On the other hand, rTMS protocols consisted of either high-frequency phasic stimulation or low-frequency tonic stimulation. The results available to date are still too few, partial and heterogeneous as to the methods applied, the clinical profile of the patients and the variables studied (different fatigue scores) in order to draw any conclusion. However, the effects obtained, especially in multiple sclerosis and fibromyalgia, are really carriers of therapeutic hope.

Source: The treatment of fatigue by non-invasive brain stimulation

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[Abstract] Breakthroughs in the spasticity management: Are non-pharmacological treatments the future?

Highlights

  • Spasticity can cause a severe disability and challenge the rehabilitation process.
  • A successful treatment of spasticity depends on a pathophysiologic assessment.
  • The main therapeutic options include physiotherapy and pharmacological treatments.
  • Non-pharmacologic approaches may reduce spasticity and improve quality of life.

Abstract

The present paper aims at providing an objective narrative review of the existing non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity. Whereas pharmacologic and conventional physiotherapy approaches result well effective in managing spasticity due to stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and incomplete spinal cord injury, the real usefulness of the non-pharmacological ones is still debated. We performed a narrative literature review of the contribution of non-pharmacological treatments to spasticity management, focusing on the role of non-invasive neurostimulation protocols (NINM). Spasticity therapeutic options available to the physicians include various pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches (including NINM and vibration therapy), aimed at achieving functional goals for patients and their caregivers. A successful treatment of spasticity depends on a clear comprehension of the underlying pathophysiology, the natural history, and the impact on patient’s performances. Even though further studies aimed at validating non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity should be fostered, there is growing evidence supporting the usefulness of non-pharmacologic approaches in significantly helping conventional treatments (physiotherapy and drugs) to reduce spasticity and improving patient’s quality of life. Hence, non-pharmacological treatments should be considered as a crucial part of an effective management of spasticity.

Source: Breakthroughs in the spasticity management: Are non-pharmacological treatments the future? – Journal of Clinical Neuroscience

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[Abstract] Breakthroughs in the spasticity management: Are non-pharmacological treatments the future?

 

Highlights

    Spasticity can cause a severe disability and challenge the rehabilitation process.
    A successful treatment of spasticity depends on a pathophysiologic assessment.
    The main therapeutic options include physiotherapy and pharmacological treatments.
    Non-pharmacologic approaches may reduce spasticity and improve quality of life.

Abstract

The present paper aims at providing an objective narrative review of the existing non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity. Whereas pharmacologic and conventional physiotherapy approaches result well effective in managing spasticity due to stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and incomplete spinal cord injury, the real usefulness of the non-pharmacological ones is still debated.

We performed a narrative literature review of the contribution of non-pharmacological treatments to spasticity management, focusing on the role of non-invasive neurostimulation protocols (NINM). Spasticity therapeutic options available to the physicians include various pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches (including NINM and vibration therapy), aimed at achieving functional goals for patients and their caregivers. A successful treatment of spasticity depends on a clear comprehension of the underlying pathophysiology, the natural history, and the impact on patient’s performances.

Even though further studies aimed at validating non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity should be fostered, there is growing evidence supporting the usefulness of non-pharmacologic approaches in significantly helping conventional treatments (physiotherapy and drugs) to reduce spasticity and improving patient’s quality of life.

Hence, non-pharmacological treatments should be considered as a crucial part of an effective management of spasticity.

Source: Breakthroughs in the spasticity management: Are non-pharmacological treatments the future?

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[ARTICLE] How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? – Full Text

Abstract:

Spastic paresis can arise from a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia. It is associated with muscle contracture, stiffness and pain, and can lead to segmental deformity. The positive, negative and biomechanical symptoms associated with spastic paresis can significantly affect patients’ quality of life, by affecting their ability to perform normal activities. This paper – based on the content of a global spasticity interdisciplinary masterclass presented by the authors for healthcare practitioners working in the field of spastic paresis – proposes a multidisciplinary approach to care involving not only healthcare practitioners, but also the patient and their family members/carers, and improvement of the transition between specialist care and community services. The suggested treatment pathway comprises assessment of the severity of spastic paresis, early access to neurorehabilitation and physiotherapy and treatment with botulinum toxin and new technologies, where appropriate. To address the challenge of maintaining patients’ motivation over the long term, tailored guided self-rehabilitation contracts can be used to set and monitor therapeutic goals. Current global consensus guidelines may have to be updated, to include a clinical care pathway related to the encompassing management of spastic paresis.

Spastic paresis may be caused by a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, retroviral and other infectious spinal cord disorders, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia.1 The exact prevalence of spastic paresis (in which spasticity is the most commonly recognised manifestation) is not known. However, it is estimated that around 30% of stroke survivors are affected by significant spasticity2 and 50% who present to hospital with stroke develop at least one severe contracture.3

Spastic paresis is a complex condition that may be associated with soft tissue contracture, pain and limitations of day-to-day activities, which have a substantial impact on patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life.4 Although treatment guidelines have been developed for (focal) spasticity,5 there remains a lack of consensus on key aspects of diagnosis, approaches to care and the care pathway that would help healthcare practitioners to more fully understand and manage this condition.

To address some of these limitations, a group of physicians and a physiotherapist with expertise in the management of spastic paresis developed a global spasticity masterclass for healthcare practitioners working in this field in order to share best practices and to discuss issues and current trends in the management of patients with spasticity. The outputs of this masterclass are presented here.

Continue —> How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? | Touch Neurology | Independent Insight for Medical Specialists

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[ARTICLE] How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? – Full Text HTML

Abstract:

Spastic paresis can arise from a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia. It is associated with muscle contracture, stiffness and pain, and can lead to segmental deformity. The positive, negative and biomechanical symptoms associated with spastic paresis can significantly affect patients’ quality of life, by affecting their ability to perform normal activities. This paper – based on the content of a global spasticity interdisciplinary masterclass presented by the authors for healthcare practitioners working in the field of spastic paresis – proposes a multidisciplinary approach to care involving not only healthcare practitioners, but also the patient and their family members/carers, and improvement of the transition between specialist care and community services. The suggested treatment pathway comprises assessment of the severity of spastic paresis, early access to neurorehabilitation and physiotherapy and treatment with botulinum toxin and new technologies, where appropriate. To address the challenge of maintaining patients’ motivation over the long term, tailored guided self-rehabilitation contracts can be used to set and monitor therapeutic goals. Current global consensus guidelines may have to be updated, to include a clinical care pathway related to the encompassing management of spastic paresis.

Spastic paresis may be caused by a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, retroviral and other infectious spinal cord disorders, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia.1 The exact prevalence of spastic paresis (in which spasticity is the most commonly recognised manifestation) is not known. However, it is estimated that around 30% of stroke survivors are affected by significant spasticity2 and 50% who present to hospital with stroke develop at least one severe contracture.3

Spastic paresis is a complex condition that may be associated with soft tissue contracture, pain and limitations of day-to-day activities, which have a substantial impact on patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life.4 Although treatment guidelines have been developed for (focal) spasticity,5 there remains a lack of consensus on key aspects of diagnosis, approaches to care and the care pathway that would help healthcare practitioners to more fully understand and manage this condition.

To address some of these limitations, a group of physicians and a physiotherapist with expertise in the management of spastic paresis developed a global spasticity masterclass for healthcare practitioners working in this field in order to share best practices and to discuss issues and current trends in the management of patients with spasticity. The outputs of this masterclass are presented here.

Pathophysiology and definitions
Spastic paresis
Spasticity is one of several components of spastic paresis, also known as the upper motor neuron (UMN) syndrome. Spastic paresis is primarily characterised by a quantitative lack of command directed to agonist muscles involved in performing movements.1,6,7 In addition, hyperactive spinal reflexes mediate some of the positive phenomena seen in spastic paresis, while other positive symptoms are related to disordered control of voluntary movement in terms of an abnormal efferent drive or are caused

Continue —> How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? | Touch Neurology | Independent Insight for Medical Specialists

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[WEB SITE] Overcome loss of Hand Function and Foot Drop. – Bioness FES – Inquiries

Regain Independence, Function, and Mobility.


Regain function with Bioness’ innovative solutions designed to help those living with Foot Drop or Hand Paralysis due to conditions such as Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, Cerebral Palsy, Traumatic Brain Injury, or Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury.
Visit Site —> Bioness FES | Inquiries

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[Review] How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? – Full Text PDF/HTML

Abstract

Spastic paresis can arise from a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia. It is associated with muscle contracture, stiffness and pain, and can lead to segmental deformity.

The positive, negative and biomechanical symptoms associated with spastic paresis can significantly affect patients’ quality of life, by affecting their ability to perform normal activities.

This paper – based on the content of a global spasticity interdisciplinary masterclass presented by the authors for healthcare practitioners working in the field of spastic paresis – proposes a multidisciplinary approach to care involving not only healthcare practitioners, but also the patient and their family members/carers, and improvement of the transition between specialist care and community services.

The suggested treatment pathway comprises assessment of the severity of spastic paresis, early access to neurorehabilitation and physiotherapy and treatment with botulinum toxin and new technologies, where appropriate. To address the challenge of maintaining patients’ motivation over the long term, tailored guided self-rehabilitation contracts can be used to set and monitor therapeutic goals. Current global consensus guidelines may have to be updated, to include a clinical care pathway related to the encompassing management of spastic paresis.

Downlload Full Text PDF

Visit WEB SITE (HTML Version)

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[VIDEO] Bioness L300 and Bioness L300 Plus – YouTube

Δημοσιεύτηκε στις 4 Ιουλ 2014

PhysioFunction are recognised as international experts in the use of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES). We ensure our clients receive the most clinically correct rehabilitation technology suited to their needs.

The L300 Foot Drop System helps to alleviate walking challenges that may result from: Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury, Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury, Multiple Sclerosis. The L300 system is an advanced functional electrical stimulation system that stimulates the nerves in the lower leg, activating muscles to lift the foot which allows you to walk more naturally.

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[WEB SITE] Pros and Cons of Functional Electrical Stimulation for MS-Related Foot Drop

If you have MS-related foot drop, functional electrical stimulation could significantly improve the way you walk. Learn the pros and cons of FES.

Source: Pros and Cons of Functional Electrical Stimulation for MS-Related Foot Drop – Everyday Health

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[WEB SITE] ProtectYour Pregnancy: Certain neurologic conditions are treated with drugs that may be dangerous or inappropriate for women of reproductive age. We asked experts about the risks and the alternatives. : Neurology Now

Gorman, Megan Othersen

Brandy Parker-McFadden had always considered herself one of the lucky ones, and by any measure she was. Diagnosed with epilepsy at age 15 after her first convulsive seizure, Parker-McFadden, now 40, has had just three seizures in the 25 years since. “I took my medications faithfully and went on with my life,” she says. “I grew up, I got married, and I had a baby—and then two more. Through it all, my epilepsy was well controlled with medication. From the outside, it was almost as though I didn’t have it.”

This was thanks in large part to valproate, an antiseizure medication prescribed by her neurologist that is often used to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder and to prevent migraines. So when her neurologist instructed her obstetrician to increase the dosage during her first pregnancy to ensure that the medicine remained at a therapeutic level within her body, Parker-McFadden didn’t question it.

That was 12 years ago, in 2003. Parker’s firstborn, Samuel, is now 11.

“Samuel was born right around the time we got the first information on cognitive risks to babies exposed to valproate in utero,” says Kimford J. Meador, MD, a professor of neurology and neurological sciences at Stanford University Medical Center in California, clinical services director of the Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology (FAAN). “There were hints in the epilepsy pregnancy registries [online databases cataloging the experiences of pregnant women taking epilepsy drugs], but what wasn’t fully known until 2004 is that one in 10 children exposed to valproate in utero will have a major complication—plus a 7- to 10-point drop in IQ. Verbal intelligence, in particular, is affected.”

Continue —>  ProtectYour Pregnancy: Certain neurologic conditions are tre… : Neurology Now

WEB EXTRA: For more information about pregnacy and epilepsy, visithttp://bit.ly/NN-pregnancy-epilepsy.

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