Posts Tagged home

[Abstract] Providing Sources of Self-Efficacy Through Technology Enhanced Post-Stroke Rehabilitation in the Home.

Abstract

This research explores the impact of receiving feedback through a Personalised Self-Managed Rehabilitation System (PSMrS) for home-based post-stroke rehabilitation on the users’ self-efficacy; more specifically, mastery experiences and the interpretation of biomechanical data. Embedded within a realistic evaluation methodological approach, exploring the promotion of self-efficacy from the utilisation of computer-based technology to facilitate post-stroke upper-limb rehabilitation in the home included; semi-structured interviews, quantitative user data (activity and usage), observations and field notes. Data revealed that self-efficacy was linked with obtaining positive knowledge of results feedback. Encouragingly, this also transferred to functional activities such as, confidence to carry out kitchen tasks and bathroom personal activities. Findings suggest the PSMrS was able to provide key sources of self-efficacy by providing feedback which translated key biomechanical data to the users. Users could interpret and understand their performance, gain a sense of mastery and build their confidence which in some instances led to increased confidence to carry out functional activities. However, outcome expectations and socio-structural factors impacted on the self-efficacy associated with the use of the system. Increasing the understanding of how these factors promote or inhibit self-management and self-efficacy is therefore crucial to the successful adoption of technology solutions and promotion of self-efficacy.

Source: Providing Sources of Self-Efficacy Through Technology Enhanced Post-Stroke Rehabilitation in the Home. – PubMed – NCBI

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[Abstract] Autonomous rehabilitation at stroke patients home for balance and gait: safety, usability and compliance of a virtual reality system.

Abstract

Background: New technologies, such as telerehabilitation and gaming devices offer the possibility for patients to train at home. This opens the challenge of safety for the patient as he is called to exercise neither with a therapist on the patients’ side nor with a therapist linked remotely to supervise the sessions.

Aim: To study the safety, usability and patient acceptance of an autonomous telerehabilitation system for balance and gait (the REWIRE platform) in the patients home.

Design: Cohort study.

Setting: Community, in the stroke patients’ home.

Population: 15 participants with first-ever stroke, with a mild to moderate residual deficit of the lower extremities.

Method: Autonomous rehabilitation based on virtual rehabilitation was provided at the participants’ home for twelve weeks. The primary outcome was compliance (the ratio between days of actual and scheduled training), analysed with the two-tailed Wilcoxon Mann- Whitney test. Furthermore safety is defined by adverse events. The secondary endpoint was the acceptance of the system measured with the Technology Acceptance Model. Additionally, the cumulative duration of weekly training was analysed.

Results: During the study there were no adverse events related to the therapy. Patients performed on average 71% (range 39 to 92%) of the scheduled sessions. The Technology Acceptance Model Questionnaire showed excellent values for stroke patients after the training. The average training duration per week was 99 ±53min.

Conclusion: Autonomous telerehabilitation for balance and gait training with the REWIRE-system is safe, feasible and can help to intensive rehabilitative therapy at home.

Clinical Rehabilitation Impact: Telerehabilitation enables safe training in home environment and supports of the standard rehabilitation therapy.

Read Article at publisher’s site

Source: Autonomous rehabilitation at stroke patients home for balance and gait: safety, usability and… – Abstract – Europe PMC

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[BLOG POST] Rehabilitation in the Home – Transitions Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy Rehabilitation in the Home

There are two main reasons why physiotherapy rehabilitation in the home has become so popular. The first, is the simple convenience of mobile physiotherapy delivered in the comfort of your own home without having to tackle traffic and parking.The second is because home-based rehabilitation really works!

Rehabilitation takes hard work and requires a lot of practice. The environment around us can affect how easy or difficult it is to practice, practice, practice! Clinic based physiotherapy is important when extra space or specialised equipment is required, and some people prefer to attend a consultation room.

Home-based physiotherapy allows you to take what you have learnt in hospital or clinic and gain real life experience with guidance from an experienced physiotherapist. There are many therapeutic benefits to rehabilitation in the home for people with neurological conditions:

  • Feeling more comfortable in a familiar environment will enhance performance
  • Gain confidence to practice tasks that are the ‘just right challenge’ in your home environment
  • Completing tasks in your own home will have greater meaning so will provide greater motivation
  • Learning tasks in the same place that you will need to practice them will lead to greater practice and repetition
  • Functional tasks such as how to get out of bed or negotiate steps can be tailoredto the exact environment where you need to perform them

Tailoring neurological physiotherapy to real-life is the focus of home visiting physiotherapy.  Rehabilitation in your own home harnesses the principles of neuroplasticity because it can fuel the motivation to continue with the practice of meaningful tasks that are the ‘just right challenge’.

Source: Rehabilitation in the Home – Transitions Physiotherapy Perth

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[Conference paper] Hand Robotic Rehabilitation: From Hospital to Home – Abstract+References

Abstract

Stroke patients are often affected by hemiparesis. In the rehabilitation of these patients the function of the hand is often neglected. Thus in this work we propose a robotic approach to the rehabilitation of the hand of a stroke patient in hospital and also at home. Some experimental results can be presented here especially for inpatients. Further experimental results on home-patients must be acquired through a telemedicine platform, designed for this application. 

References

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Source: Hand Robotic Rehabilitation: From Hospital to Home | SpringerLink

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[Abstract+References] High-Intensity Chronic Stroke Motor Imagery Neurofeedback Training at Home: Three Case Reports 

Motor imagery (MI) with neurofeedback has been suggested as promising for motor recovery after stroke. Evidence suggests that regular training facilitates compensatory plasticity, but frequent training is difficult to integrate into everyday life. Using a wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) system, we implemented a frequent and efficient neurofeedback training at the patients’ home. Aiming to overcome maladaptive changes in cortical lateralization patterns we presented a visual feedback, representing the degree of contralateral sensorimotor cortical activity and the degree of sensorimotor cortex lateralization. Three stroke patients practiced every other day, over a period of 4 weeks. Training-related changes were evaluated on behavioral, functional, and structural levels. All 3 patients indicated that they enjoyed the training and were highly motivated throughout the entire training regime. EEG activity induced by MI of the affected hand became more lateralized over the course of training in all three patients. The patient with a significant functional change also showed increased white matter integrity as revealed by diffusion tensor imaging, and a substantial clinical improvement of upper limb motor functions. Our study provides evidence that regular, home-based practice of MI neurofeedback has the potential to facilitate cortical reorganization and may also increase associated improvements of upper limb motor function in chronic stroke patients.

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Source: High-Intensity Chronic Stroke Motor Imagery Neurofeedback Training at Home: Three Case ReportsClinical EEG and Neuroscience – Catharina Zich, Stefan Debener, Clara Schweinitz, Annette Sterr, Joost Meekes, Cornelia Kranczioch, 2017

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[WEB SITE] Restorative Therapies, Inc. Offers Expanded Options for RT300 at Home Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling

Restorative Therapies, Inc. advances its new era in physical and occupational therapy systems for neurological injury and paralysis, announcing new options for home-based use of the groundbreaking RT300 functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling system.

(PRWEB) June 05, 2017

FES is a physical and occupational therapy modality used to evoke functional movements and exercise not otherwise possible for individuals with a neurological impairment such as a spinal cord injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, brain injury or transverse myelitis.

Restorative Therapies is the developer of FES medical devices for clinic and at home activity-based therapies. RT300 FES cycle is the result of Restorative Therapies’ ongoing commitment to the research and development of FES powered physical and occupational therapy systems. RT300 is the FES cycle chosen by all leading neurological rehabilitation clinics. RT300 has been used by over 65,000 individuals with neurological impairments.

RT300 is available for home use with an entry level system starting at $10,995. This 6 channel leg and trunk FES system includes multiple therapy options including standard, isokinetic and interval therapies and access to our FES therapy database RTILink.com which tracks outcomes motivating patients. RT300 is also unique in being easily expanded to include arms, additional channels of FES and ability to target any impaired leg, arm, shoulder or trunk muscle group.

Many people can also benefit from the use of FES separate from cycling, as a therapy for functional activities such as standing, transfers, feeding, brushing hair etc. Restorative Therapies’ new Xcite system evokes coordinated muscle contractions to assist with a wide range of task specific, strengthening and gross motor activities. RT300 home systems are expanding to include Xcite at home so patients can benefit not only from cycling but also these other activities.

Restorative Therapies’ commitment to RT300 home use is supported by our acclaimed insurance reimbursement process and dedicated clinical and technical support teams.

“Very impressed with the ownership Restorative Therapies took of the insurance appeal process. Meredith our installer was wonderful during the install process and I appreciate her knowledge and patience,” said Maryann Murphy, RT300 at home rider. “The quality of RT300 is excellent and the user manuals and website are very helpful. I had an excellent experience with Restorative Therapies and I appreciate the resources and customer support that I have access to as a customer.”

“RT300 is the most practical FES cycle because its flexibility and expandability allow it to cater to the varied needs of people with a neurological injury or paralysis. Reaching over 65,000 individuals is the result of a huge team effort between Restorative Therapies and our clinic partners,” says Andrew Barriskill, CEO of Restorative Therapies. “Together we have worked to make RT300 easy to use at home. Our new entry level systems with important therapy options including Xcite will help us assist more people with neurological impairments at home.”

“The continued growth of home FES cycling is enormously motivating to me and my team,” said Wendy Warfield MSHA, OTR/L, Clinical Manager of Restorative Therapies. “This level of at-home FES use completes the continuum of care for people with weak or paralyzed muscles due to a variety of conditions, diseases, and events,” concludes Warfield.

About Restorative Therapies
Restorative Therapies’ mission is to help people with a neurological impairment or in critical care achieve their full recovery potential. Restorative Therapies combines activity-based physical therapy and Functional Electrical Stimulation as a rehabilitation therapy for those with impaired mobility associated with conditions including but not limited to stroke, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, brain injury, transverse myelitis, and spinal cord injury or for patients in critical care.

Restorative Therapies is a privately held company headquartered in Baltimore. To learn more about Restorative Therapies please visit us at http://www.restorative-therapies.com 

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/06/prweb14388936.htm

Source: Restorative Therapies, Inc. Offers Expanded Options for RT300 at Home Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling | Benzinga

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[BLOG POST] Essential Devices for Adapting the Home After Stroke

Strokes affect everybody differently, leaving victims to live with a variety of challenging physical and cognitive conditions. Many factors need to be considered when managing stroke recovery: damaged parts of the brain, severity of injuries, numbness or weakness of the body, loss of motor skills, extreme fatigue.

The problems seem overwhelming, but victims can move forward. With love, support, and hope, a stroke survivor has the potential to successfully regain independence. By implementing safety precautions at home, changes in lifestyle, and utilizing adaptive equipment, a victim can improve their rehabilitation and maintain self-sufficiency.

 

Living at Home After a Stroke

For someone who has suffered a minor stroke, returning home and recovering is simpler than it is for those affected by more severe stroke consequences. If you or a loved one faces significant injuries, achieving independence at home relies on several factors.

Taking Care of Yourself

Perhaps the most important factor of all, rehabilitation at home entails carrying out daily fundamental tasks. This includes feeding yourself, toileting, changing clothes regularly, strengthening movement and communication skills, and maintaining good hygiene.

Taking Medications on Time

Along with performing basic tasks, it’s important to follow medical advice and prescriptions. Making sure to take medications as prescribed and perform other medical regiments, will greatly decrease the chances of having another stroke, as well as reduce issues after suffering from one.

Having a Caregiver

Giving you full-time attention and support, a caregiver is a tremendous way to rebuild confidence and reclaim independence. A caregiver can assist with maintaining daily routines, taking medications, and being a source of moral support throughout the recovery period.

Home Adaptability

Safety always comes first, and if recovery is taking place in the home, then certain precautions must be taken to ensure proper rehabilitation. The first step is to take away anything that could be a potential hazard, such as loose carpets, electrical cords, or clutter. Open space is best for patients as they set up to move around the home. Clearing out unnecessary objects will allow open pathways to and from different parts of the house. If mobility is a greater concern, handrails and transfer benches can be installed to promote a greater and safer self-reliance.

It’s important to contact a healthcare team to determine whether moving home is the right fit for a survivor after a stroke. It is always a good idea to discuss the options of recovery and determining which kinds of adaptive equipment and home modifications will help most. Below is a general guide to assistive devices that will be helpful to the average stroke survivor.

Best Assistive Devices

Best Bathroom Assistive Devices

Grab Rails

Install rails to provide support when transferring in and out of the bath or shower. The type needed will depend on the patient’s limitations and safety concerns.To make your selection easier, here is a comprehensive guide to review:http://www.dlf.org.uk/factsheets/grab-rails#6.

 

Slip-Resistant Mats

Slip-resistant mats are mats that are fitted to the bottom of a shower or tub and have self-adhesive capabilities to lower the chances of slipping. They are perfect for someone with decreased balance, difficulty with standing or sitting and limited safety awareness. Make sure to refrain from using any kind of oils and other liquids that could prevent the mat from sticking.

more —> Essential Devices for Adapting the Home After Stroke | Saebo

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[WEB SITE] Restorative Therapies, Inc., Today Announced FDA Clearance for the New Xcite Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) System

Xcite multichannel FES for neuro re-education.

Restorative Therapies is the designer of medical devices providing clinic and in-home restoration therapy. Xcite is the next in the series of FES powered physical therapy systems that started with the company’s hugely successful RT300 FES cycle.

FES is a physical therapy rehabilitation modality used to evoke functional movements and exercise not otherwise possible for individuals with a neurological impairment such as a spinal cord injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy.

FDA 510(k) marketing clearance allows Restorative Therapies to commence marketing Xcite in the USA.

The new Xcite FES system delivers up to 12 channels of electrical stimulation to nerves which activate core, leg and arm muscles. Easy to use sequenced stimulation evokes functional movement enabling a patient’s paralyzed or weak muscles to move through dynamic movement patterns.

“Xcite is a physical therapy system which provides a library of coordinated multichannel FES therapies for people with neurological impairments,” said Prof. David Ditor of Brock University, in Ontario, Canada, “After being involved in the development trials we are excited to see the system obtain FDA clearance in addition to the existing CE mark, Canadian and Australian approvals making the system more widely available.”

“Xcite is the first truly practical FES rehabilitation system of this kind that I have seen. In addition to combining several valuable neuro-rehabilitation interventions, functional electrical stimulation, mass practice and neuromuscular re-education, Xcite is portable and easy enough to use that it could be used in the patient’s home,” said Prof. Susan Harkema of the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, University of Louisville.

“In the context of rehabilitation influencing neural plasticity as a means for neural restoration, training in the home setting is an essential component of progress and I see Xcite as a great tool in achieving this,” concludes Harkema.

“Repetitive practice of task specific, strengthening and gross motor activities have long been a cornerstone of PT and OT programs for patients with neurological impairments or muscle weakness,” says Andrew Barriskill, CEO of Restorative Therapies. “Xcite is designed to be easily integrated into these traditional programs. Xcite enhances the impact of the traditional therapeutic activities that support neuromuscular reeducation.”

Xcite is the latest result of Restorative Therapies commitment to ongoing development of FES powered physical therapy systems designed to help people with neurological impairments maximize their recovery potential.

About Restorative Therapies
Restorative Therapies mission is to help people with a neurological impairment or in critical care achieve their full recovery potential. Restorative Therapies combines activity-based physical therapy and Functional Electrical Stimulation as a rehabilitation therapy for immobility associated with paralysis such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury or for patients in critical care.

Restorative Therapies is a privately held company headquartered in Baltimore. To learn more about Restorative Therapies please visit us at http://www.restorative-therapies.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/restorative.therapies.inc
Twitter: @rtifes
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/restothera

Contact:
Judy Kline, Director of Sales and Marketing

Source: Restorative Therapies, Inc., Today Announced FDA Clearance for the New Xcite Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) System

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[ARTICLE] Real-time diagnostic data in multi-user virtual reality post-stroke therapy

Abstract

We present a novel multi-user virtual reality (VR) environment for post-stroke rehabilitation that can be used independently in the home to improve upper extremity motor function. This project represents a collaborative multidisciplinary approach to upper extremity therapy that reinvents engagement with health, social communication and well-being for stroke survivors. This work is in the pre-clinical phase of an ongoing interdisciplinary research effort at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago which involves a team of artists, engineers, researchers and occupational therapists. This work bridges art, science and healthcare research. Our project attempts to extend traditional occupational therapy and make virtual reality art accessible for all people. It inspires a playful and natural social interaction in the comfort of the home setting for stroke survivors with hemiparesis by furthering social engagement through the rehabilitation exercises. It fosters interaction and collaboration between individual users and encourages the exchange of user-generated content. At the same time, the system captures continuous kinematic data, which can be used to better tailor therapy to the individual.

Source: Real-time diagnostic data in multi-user virtual reality post-stroke therapy

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[ARTICLE] Task-specific reach-to-grasp training after stroke: Development and description of a home-based intervention – UWE Research Repository

Abstract

Objective: To describe and justify the development of a home-based, task-specific upper limb training intervention to improve reach-to-grasp after stroke and pilot it for feasibility and acceptability prior to a randomised controlled trial.

Intervention description: The intervention is based on intensive practice of whole reach-to-grasp tasks and part-practice of essential reach-to-grasp components. A ‘pilot’ manual of activities covering the domains of self-care, leisure and productivity was developed for the feasibility study. The intervention comprises 14 hours of therapist-delivered sessions over 6 weeks, with additional self-practice recommended for 42 hours (i.e. 1 hour every day). As part of a feasibility randomised controlled trial, 24 people with a wide range of upper limb impairment after stroke experienced the intervention to test adherence and acceptability. The median number of repetitions in 1-hour therapist-delivered sessions was 157 (IQR: 96-211). The amount of self-practice was poorly documented. Where recorded, median amount of practice was 30 minutes (IQR: 22-45) per day. Findings demonstrated that the majority of participants found the intensity, content and level of difficulty of the intervention acceptable, and the programme to be beneficial. Comments on the content and presentation of the self-practice material were incorporated in a revised ‘final’ intervention manual.

Discussion: A comprehensive training intervention to improve reach-to-grasp for people living at home after stroke has been described in accordance with the TIDieR reporting guidelines. The intervention has been piloted, found to be acceptable and feasible in the home setting.

Source: Task-specific reach-to-grasp training after stroke: Development and description of a home-based intervention – UWE Research Repository

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