Posts Tagged spinal cord injury

[VIDEO] Sex and Masturbation after a Spinal Cord Injury – YouTube

Live To Roll – This is my personal knowledge and experience about having sex after a SCI as well as how to best achieve ejaculation during sex and masturbation.

Content times:
Can I get erections and have sex? – 1:20
Intimate Rider – 3:33
Achieving ejaculation – 8:44

Intimate rider
https://www.intimaterider.com

Ferti-Care Medical vibrator
https://medicalvibrator.com

Wand massager

https://www.amazon.com/Shibari-Wand-O…

https://www.amazon.com/Magic-Massager…

https://www.amazon.com/Massager-Handh…

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https://www.amazon.com/Hitachi-Massag…

Intro music by: Art of Decay

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[ARTICLE] Body-Machine Interfaces after Spinal Cord Injury: Rehabilitation and Brain Plasticity – Full Text HTML

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify rehabilitative effects and changes in white matter microstructure in people with high-level spinal cord injury following bilateral upper-extremity motor skill training. Five subjects with high-level (C5–C6) spinal cord injury (SCI) performed five visuo-spatial motor training tasks over 12 sessions (2–3 sessions per week). Subjects controlled a two-dimensional cursor with bilateral simultaneous movements of the shoulders using a non-invasive inertial measurement unit-based body-machine interface. Subjects’ upper-body ability was evaluated before the start, in the middle and a day after the completion of training. MR imaging data were acquired before the start and within two days of the completion of training. Subjects learned to use upper-body movements that survived the injury to control the body-machine interface and improved their performance with practice. Motor training increased Manual Muscle Test scores and the isometric force of subjects’ shoulders and upper arms. Moreover, motor training increased fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the cingulum of the left hemisphere by 6.02% on average, indicating localized white matter microstructure changes induced by activity-dependent modulation of axon diameter, myelin thickness or axon number. This body-machine interface may serve as a platform to develop a new generation of assistive-rehabilitative devices that promote the use of, and that re-strengthen, the motor and sensory functions that survived the injury.

1. Introduction

Despite progress in the field of assistive technologies for people who suffered an injury to the spinal cord, most of the current devices to control computers and wheelchairs are set in place to require as little physical effort from the user as possible, and little attention has been paid to maintaining and strengthening the neural and muscular resources that survived the injury [1,2,3,4]. Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to motor impairment, weakness, muscular and cortical atrophy and altered reflexes, and these have been shown to progress further with lack of exercise [5,6,7,8,9,10]. Even in individuals with injuries to the cervical spinal cord, some motor and sensory capacities may remain available in the upper body. Several studies have shown that using their remaining functions and keeping an active body is critical for people with SCI in order to avoid the collateral effects of paralysis and to potentially recover some of the lost mobility [5,6,7,11]. Therefore, it is crucial to develop the next generation of assistive-rehabilitative devices that promote learning through upper-body coordination.
Acquisition, retention and refinement of motor skills all rely on the capability of the nervous system to create new patterns of neural activation for accomplishing new tasks and for recovering lost motor functions [12]. Recent advances in neural imaging have allowed learning studies on juggling [13], balance [14] and body-machine interfaces (BMIs) by our group [15], to demonstrate motor skill learning-induced structural changes of cortical and subcortical areas in both gray matter and white matter by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). DTI non-invasively measures the direction and rate of water diffusion within tissue. White matter integrity is commonly measured by fractional anisotropy (FA), a normalized measure of the variance of the diffusion ellipsoid at each voxel [16]. FA values for white matter tissue have been shown to be affected by physiological parameters, such as axon diameter, axon number and myelin thickness [17].
Loss of somatosensory afference leads to functional cortical reorganization [18,19,20]. SCI has been shown to lead to spinal cord atrophy, cortical atrophy of primary and sensory cortex [8], descending motor tracts [9] and cortical reorganization of the sensorimotor system [8,10], and the degree of cortical reorganization is associated with the level of disability. Although the goal of most SCI treatments is to re-establish neural connections in order to restore motor function, it is unclear whether the anatomical and functional changes that follow injury can be reversed.
In this study, we investigated the rehabilitative effects and learning-induced changes in the brain white matter microstructure of people with high-level SCI after they practiced coordinated upper-body movements to control a computer cursor through a novel body-machine interface. Subjects learned to use the remaining ability of their shoulders and upper arms to perform movements that controlled a computer cursor to complete different related tasks. Complementary to [15], the purpose of this study was to identify changes in motor function and white matter by comparing clinical scores and FA values pre- and post-bilateral upper-body motor skill training in people with a high-level spinal cord injury. We started from the assumption that motor learning is likely to be associated with different brain reorganization in unimpaired subjects compared to subjects with tetraplegia, in consideration also of the greater need for the reorganization of motor functions in the latter group.

Continue —> Brain Sciences | Free Full-Text | Body-Machine Interfaces after Spinal Cord Injury: Rehabilitation and Brain Plasticity | HTML

Figure 5. Regions showing lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects compared to controls. (A) Brain regions associated with motor function used to perform tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and ROI analyses; (B) TBSS results. Regions showing significantly higher (red-yellow) and lower (blue-light blue) FA values in SCI versus control subjects overlaid over the standard Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI)152 T1-weighted anatomical scan (p < 0.05, uncorrected). The location of each slice in Montreal Neurological Institute space is shown at the lower left section. a-s-pCR, anterior, superior and posterior corona radiata; CG, cingulum; g-bCC, genu and body of corpus callosum; a-pIC, anterior and posterior limbs of internal capsule.

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[Abstract] Breakthroughs in the spasticity management: Are non-pharmacological treatments the future?

Highlights

  • Spasticity can cause a severe disability and challenge the rehabilitation process.
  • A successful treatment of spasticity depends on a pathophysiologic assessment.
  • The main therapeutic options include physiotherapy and pharmacological treatments.
  • Non-pharmacologic approaches may reduce spasticity and improve quality of life.

Abstract

The present paper aims at providing an objective narrative review of the existing non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity. Whereas pharmacologic and conventional physiotherapy approaches result well effective in managing spasticity due to stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and incomplete spinal cord injury, the real usefulness of the non-pharmacological ones is still debated. We performed a narrative literature review of the contribution of non-pharmacological treatments to spasticity management, focusing on the role of non-invasive neurostimulation protocols (NINM). Spasticity therapeutic options available to the physicians include various pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches (including NINM and vibration therapy), aimed at achieving functional goals for patients and their caregivers. A successful treatment of spasticity depends on a clear comprehension of the underlying pathophysiology, the natural history, and the impact on patient’s performances. Even though further studies aimed at validating non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity should be fostered, there is growing evidence supporting the usefulness of non-pharmacologic approaches in significantly helping conventional treatments (physiotherapy and drugs) to reduce spasticity and improving patient’s quality of life. Hence, non-pharmacological treatments should be considered as a crucial part of an effective management of spasticity.

Source: Breakthroughs in the spasticity management: Are non-pharmacological treatments the future? – Journal of Clinical Neuroscience

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[Abstract] Breakthroughs in the spasticity management: Are non-pharmacological treatments the future?

 

Highlights

    Spasticity can cause a severe disability and challenge the rehabilitation process.
    A successful treatment of spasticity depends on a pathophysiologic assessment.
    The main therapeutic options include physiotherapy and pharmacological treatments.
    Non-pharmacologic approaches may reduce spasticity and improve quality of life.

Abstract

The present paper aims at providing an objective narrative review of the existing non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity. Whereas pharmacologic and conventional physiotherapy approaches result well effective in managing spasticity due to stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and incomplete spinal cord injury, the real usefulness of the non-pharmacological ones is still debated.

We performed a narrative literature review of the contribution of non-pharmacological treatments to spasticity management, focusing on the role of non-invasive neurostimulation protocols (NINM). Spasticity therapeutic options available to the physicians include various pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches (including NINM and vibration therapy), aimed at achieving functional goals for patients and their caregivers. A successful treatment of spasticity depends on a clear comprehension of the underlying pathophysiology, the natural history, and the impact on patient’s performances.

Even though further studies aimed at validating non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity should be fostered, there is growing evidence supporting the usefulness of non-pharmacologic approaches in significantly helping conventional treatments (physiotherapy and drugs) to reduce spasticity and improving patient’s quality of life.

Hence, non-pharmacological treatments should be considered as a crucial part of an effective management of spasticity.

Source: Breakthroughs in the spasticity management: Are non-pharmacological treatments the future?

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[ARTICLE] Development and assessment of a hand assist device: GRIPIT – Full Text

Abstract

Background

Although various hand assist devices have been commercialized for people with paralysis, they are somewhat limited in terms of tool fixation and device attachment method. Hand exoskeleton robots allow users to grasp a wider range of tools but are heavy, complicated, and bulky owing to the presence of numerous actuators and controllers. The GRIPIT hand assist device overcomes the limitations of both conventional devices and exoskeleton robots by providing improved tool fixation and device attachment in a lightweight and compact device. GRIPIT has been designed to assist tripod grasp for people with spinal cord injury because this grasp posture is frequently used in school and offices for such activities as writing and grasping small objects.

Methods

The main development objective of GRIPIT is to assist users to grasp tools with their own hand using a lightweight, compact assistive device that is manually operated via a single wire. GRIPIT consists of only a glove, a wire, and a small structure that maintains tendon tension to permit a stable grasp. The tendon routing points are designed to apply force to the thumb, index finger, and middle finger to form a tripod grasp. A tension-maintenance structure sustains the grasp posture with appropriate tension. Following device development, four people with spinal cord injury were recruited to verify the writing performance of GRIPIT compared to the performance of a conventional penholder and handwriting. Writing was chosen as the assessment task because it requires a tripod grasp, which is one of the main performance objectives of GRIPIT.

Results

New assessment, which includes six different writing tasks, was devised to measure writing ability from various viewpoints including both qualitative and quantitative methods, while most conventional assessments include only qualitative methods or simple time measuring assessments. Appearance, portability, difficulty of wearing, difficulty of grasping the subject, writing sensation, fatigability, and legibility were measured to assess qualitative performance while writing various words and sentences. Results showed that GRIPIT is relatively complicated to wear and use compared to a conventional assist device but has advantages for writing sensation, fatigability, and legibility because it affords sufficient grasp force during writing. Two quantitative performance factors were assessed, accuracy of writing and solidity of writing. To assess accuracy of writing, we asked subjects to draw various figures under given conditions. To assess solidity of writing, pen tip force and the angle variation of the pen were measured. Quantitative evaluation results showed that GRIPIT helps users to write accurately without pen shakes even high force is applied on the pen.

Conclusions

Qualitative and quantitative results were better when subjects used GRIPIT than when they used the conventional penholder, mainly because GRIPIT allowed them to exert a higher grasp force. Grasp force is important because disabled people cannot control their fingers and thus need to move their entire arm to write, while non-disabled people only need to move their fingers to write. The tension-maintenance structure developed for GRIPIT provides appropriate grasp force and moment balance on the user’s hand, but the other writing method only fixes the pen using friction force or requires the user’s arm to generate a grasp force.

Background

The hand is one of the most essential body parts for independent living because so many tasks of daily life, such as writing, eating, and grasping, require a functional hand. People who suffer from permanent paralysis of the hand owing to cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury (SCI), stroke, and other neurological disorders require assistive or rehabilitation devices in order to regain independence and return to work [1, 2].

A selection of commercialized hand assist devices is shown in Fig. 1. These devices are attached to the user’s arm or hand with Velcro® or elastic bands, and hand tools such as pens, forks, and paintbrushes are clamped into a hole in the devices. One drawback of these devices is that they can only grasp one type of tool because the receiving hole is a constant size. Users also must sometimes sustain an awkward posture to use a tool because it is mounted into the device in an unfamiliar position. Additionally, the Velcro or elastic band used to fix the device can apply high pressure to the skin if the strapping is too tight, and tools can be too shaky to use if the strapping becomes too loose. These problems reduce the usability of these devices and require users to put in a certain of amount of training time to become familiar with their use.

Fig. 1 Various types of hand assist devices for people with hand paralysis. a Writing aid. b Eating aid. c Grasping aid. d Cooking aid

Continue —> Development and assessment of a hand assist device: GRIPIT | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

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[ARTICLE] How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? – Full Text

Abstract:

Spastic paresis can arise from a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia. It is associated with muscle contracture, stiffness and pain, and can lead to segmental deformity. The positive, negative and biomechanical symptoms associated with spastic paresis can significantly affect patients’ quality of life, by affecting their ability to perform normal activities. This paper – based on the content of a global spasticity interdisciplinary masterclass presented by the authors for healthcare practitioners working in the field of spastic paresis – proposes a multidisciplinary approach to care involving not only healthcare practitioners, but also the patient and their family members/carers, and improvement of the transition between specialist care and community services. The suggested treatment pathway comprises assessment of the severity of spastic paresis, early access to neurorehabilitation and physiotherapy and treatment with botulinum toxin and new technologies, where appropriate. To address the challenge of maintaining patients’ motivation over the long term, tailored guided self-rehabilitation contracts can be used to set and monitor therapeutic goals. Current global consensus guidelines may have to be updated, to include a clinical care pathway related to the encompassing management of spastic paresis.

Spastic paresis may be caused by a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, retroviral and other infectious spinal cord disorders, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia.1 The exact prevalence of spastic paresis (in which spasticity is the most commonly recognised manifestation) is not known. However, it is estimated that around 30% of stroke survivors are affected by significant spasticity2 and 50% who present to hospital with stroke develop at least one severe contracture.3

Spastic paresis is a complex condition that may be associated with soft tissue contracture, pain and limitations of day-to-day activities, which have a substantial impact on patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life.4 Although treatment guidelines have been developed for (focal) spasticity,5 there remains a lack of consensus on key aspects of diagnosis, approaches to care and the care pathway that would help healthcare practitioners to more fully understand and manage this condition.

To address some of these limitations, a group of physicians and a physiotherapist with expertise in the management of spastic paresis developed a global spasticity masterclass for healthcare practitioners working in this field in order to share best practices and to discuss issues and current trends in the management of patients with spasticity. The outputs of this masterclass are presented here.

Continue —> How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? | Touch Neurology | Independent Insight for Medical Specialists

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[ARTICLE] How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? – Full Text HTML

Abstract:

Spastic paresis can arise from a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia. It is associated with muscle contracture, stiffness and pain, and can lead to segmental deformity. The positive, negative and biomechanical symptoms associated with spastic paresis can significantly affect patients’ quality of life, by affecting their ability to perform normal activities. This paper – based on the content of a global spasticity interdisciplinary masterclass presented by the authors for healthcare practitioners working in the field of spastic paresis – proposes a multidisciplinary approach to care involving not only healthcare practitioners, but also the patient and their family members/carers, and improvement of the transition between specialist care and community services. The suggested treatment pathway comprises assessment of the severity of spastic paresis, early access to neurorehabilitation and physiotherapy and treatment with botulinum toxin and new technologies, where appropriate. To address the challenge of maintaining patients’ motivation over the long term, tailored guided self-rehabilitation contracts can be used to set and monitor therapeutic goals. Current global consensus guidelines may have to be updated, to include a clinical care pathway related to the encompassing management of spastic paresis.

Spastic paresis may be caused by a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, retroviral and other infectious spinal cord disorders, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia.1 The exact prevalence of spastic paresis (in which spasticity is the most commonly recognised manifestation) is not known. However, it is estimated that around 30% of stroke survivors are affected by significant spasticity2 and 50% who present to hospital with stroke develop at least one severe contracture.3

Spastic paresis is a complex condition that may be associated with soft tissue contracture, pain and limitations of day-to-day activities, which have a substantial impact on patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life.4 Although treatment guidelines have been developed for (focal) spasticity,5 there remains a lack of consensus on key aspects of diagnosis, approaches to care and the care pathway that would help healthcare practitioners to more fully understand and manage this condition.

To address some of these limitations, a group of physicians and a physiotherapist with expertise in the management of spastic paresis developed a global spasticity masterclass for healthcare practitioners working in this field in order to share best practices and to discuss issues and current trends in the management of patients with spasticity. The outputs of this masterclass are presented here.

Pathophysiology and definitions
Spastic paresis
Spasticity is one of several components of spastic paresis, also known as the upper motor neuron (UMN) syndrome. Spastic paresis is primarily characterised by a quantitative lack of command directed to agonist muscles involved in performing movements.1,6,7 In addition, hyperactive spinal reflexes mediate some of the positive phenomena seen in spastic paresis, while other positive symptoms are related to disordered control of voluntary movement in terms of an abnormal efferent drive or are caused

Continue —> How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? | Touch Neurology | Independent Insight for Medical Specialists

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[WEB SITE] Overcome loss of Hand Function and Foot Drop. – Bioness FES – Inquiries

Regain Independence, Function, and Mobility.


Regain function with Bioness’ innovative solutions designed to help those living with Foot Drop or Hand Paralysis due to conditions such as Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, Cerebral Palsy, Traumatic Brain Injury, or Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury.
Visit Site —> Bioness FES | Inquiries

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[Abstract] Brain-computer interfaces for communication and rehabilitation : Nature Reviews Neurology

Abstract

Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) use brain activity to control external devices, thereby enabling severely disabled patients to interact with the environment. A variety of invasive and noninvasive techniques for controlling BCIs have been explored, most notably EEG, and more recently, near-infrared spectroscopy. Assistive BCIs are designed to enable paralyzed patients to communicate or control external robotic devices, such as prosthetics; rehabilitative BCIs are designed to facilitate recovery of neural function. In this Review, we provide an overview of the development of BCIs and the current technology available before discussing experimental and clinical studies of BCIs. We first consider the use of BCIs for communication in patients who are paralyzed, particularly those with locked-in syndrome or complete locked-in syndrome as a result of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We then discuss the use of BCIs for motor rehabilitation after severe stroke and spinal cord injury. We also describe the possible neurophysiological and learning mechanisms that underlie the clinical efficacy of BCIs.

Figures

  1. General framework of brain-computer interface (BCI) systems.
    Figure 1
  2. Use of a brain-computer interface in severe chronic stroke.
    Figure 2

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Source: Brain-computer interfaces for communication and rehabilitation : Nature Reviews Neurology : Nature Research

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[Review] How Can We Improve Current Practice in Spastic Paresis? – Full Text PDF/HTML

Abstract

Spastic paresis can arise from a variety of conditions, including stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and hereditary spastic paraplegia. It is associated with muscle contracture, stiffness and pain, and can lead to segmental deformity.

The positive, negative and biomechanical symptoms associated with spastic paresis can significantly affect patients’ quality of life, by affecting their ability to perform normal activities.

This paper – based on the content of a global spasticity interdisciplinary masterclass presented by the authors for healthcare practitioners working in the field of spastic paresis – proposes a multidisciplinary approach to care involving not only healthcare practitioners, but also the patient and their family members/carers, and improvement of the transition between specialist care and community services.

The suggested treatment pathway comprises assessment of the severity of spastic paresis, early access to neurorehabilitation and physiotherapy and treatment with botulinum toxin and new technologies, where appropriate. To address the challenge of maintaining patients’ motivation over the long term, tailored guided self-rehabilitation contracts can be used to set and monitor therapeutic goals. Current global consensus guidelines may have to be updated, to include a clinical care pathway related to the encompassing management of spastic paresis.

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